OUR VIEWPOINT: Giving Servants a Break | Editorial

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Herald & Review Editorial Board

We now have evidence that is more than apocryphal. People in service industries are leaving their jobs in record numbers.

These help signs and unreal bonuses aren’t going anywhere anytime soon.

What kind of problems cause a restaurant worker or a retail worker to turn their back on the job? Take a close look the next time you go shopping or sit down in a restaurant.

Would you like to be treated the way you see these workers?

Workers who have their face immediately in front of the public are the most vulnerable and the most underestimated. Complaining to that employee about almost anything is like, to quote comedian Bobcat Goldthwait, like complaining to Ronald McDonald when you don’t like your cheeseburger.

This worker is the point where the pressure from all directions ends. We don’t know if this person replaces an absent worker, fights with a coworker, or is put in a position by a boss where they shouldn’t be.

But customers don’t always think about the hardships of workers. This is understandable. After months of sacrifice, if we go out to be served, we want to be served. It turns out that some of us are more demanding than others, and some of us are louder than others.

Some of us certainly have the ability to be so angry, so obnoxious, so sharp in our presence and our behavior that we can make someone who receives this anger want to go and hide in their room and never come out.

More than ever, we need to help each other. There are so many things that try, with varying degrees of success, to divide us. We do not need to integrate these attitudes into our daily transactions.

Fancy a project? Try, once a day or once a week, but at least try to say something nice to a service employee. It could offset a former rude customer, and it could make them work and serve.


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