Photography styles – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:54:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Photography styles – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 Julia Fox: Who is Kanye West’s new girlfriend, Uncut Gems actress age, did she have a baby, explains blood art https://maxkol.org/julia-fox-who-is-kanye-wests-new-girlfriend-uncut-gems-actress-age-did-she-have-a-baby-explains-blood-art/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 11:47:12 +0000 https://maxkol.org/julia-fox-who-is-kanye-wests-new-girlfriend-uncut-gems-actress-age-did-she-have-a-baby-explains-blood-art/ Julia Fox is friends with Madonna and regularly posts about her relationship with Ye on Instagram Julia Fox at the rag & bone Deli Pop-Up Party co-hosted in September 2021 in New York City (Photo: Craig Barritt/Getty Images for rag & bone) Kanye West has been named a suspect in an alleged battery charge, the […]]]>

Julia Fox is friends with Madonna and regularly posts about her relationship with Ye on Instagram

Julia Fox at the rag & bone Deli Pop-Up Party co-hosted in September 2021 in New York City (Photo: Craig Barritt/Getty Images for rag & bone)

Kanye West has been named a suspect in an alleged battery charge, the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) has said.

The rapper is being investigated after an incident was reported in the early hours of Thursday morning (January 13) in Los Angeles.

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It appears West was socializing with singer Madonna, boxer Floyd Mayweather and his actress girlfriend Julia Fox hours before the alleged offense.

But who is Julia Fox, and how long have the couple been together?

Here’s everything you need to know about her.

Who is Julia Fox?

The 31-year-old is an Italian-American actress, artist, model and filmmaker, best known for her debut performance in the 2019 film Uncut Gems alongside Adam Sandler.

Prior to her role in Uncut Gems, Fox was a clothing designer and launched a successful women’s knitwear line called Franziska Fox.

She has also worked as a painter and exhibiting photographer and self-published two photography books in 2015 and 2016.

In 2017, Fox held an art exhibition titled “RIP Julia Fox'”, which featured silk canvases painted with her own blood. She has also worked as a dominatrix and posed for the latest nude issue of Playboy magazine in 2015.

Fox is already married, having married private pilot Peter Artemiev in 2018.

The couple reportedly split in 2020, but in February 2021 it was announced that Fox had given birth to their son, Valentino, and they were pictured together at events through June 2021.

Fox and ex-husband Peter Artemiev with son Valentino at the premiere of No Sudden Move during the Tribeca Festival in New York in June 2021 (Photo: Santiago Felipe/Getty Images)

How long have West and Fox been dating?

In January 2022, Fox confirmed her romance with Kanye West and detailed their first dates in a blog post for Interview Magazine.

The pair met on New Years Eve in Miami and were later pictured together attending the Tony Award-nominated Slave Play on Broadway.

“After the play, we chose to dine at Le Carbone, which is one of my favorite restaurants,” she said.

“The whole restaurant loved it and cheered us on as it happened,” she added.

Fox, who is Italian-American, also shared a series of photos from their second date in which the couple were seen kissing passionately as she tried on clothes.

“You had an entire hotel suite full of clothes,” she revealed. “It was every girl’s dream come true. It felt like a real Cinderella moment.

Fox said she didn’t know where their relationship was going “but if it’s any indication of the future, I love the ride.”

What happened to Kim Kardashian?

The reality TV star filed for divorce from West in February 2021, citing irreconcilable differences that “continued to exist” between the two, following their extravagant 2014 wedding.

She is now dating comedian Pete Davidson.

Has West been arrested?

In a statement, the LAPD said, “This morning at 3 a.m. officers responded to Santa Fe Ave and Bay Street. A battery report has been completed with Kanye West as a named suspect.

“No arrests have been made and the incident is being investigated by our Newton Division.”

On the same day, it was announced that West would headline the 2022 Coachella Music Festival alongside Harry Styles and Billie Eilish.

The global megastar, 44, will fill the Sunday slots at the world-renowned event, which takes place in the Southern California desert.

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Iconic postmodern New York lobby doomed to destruction: can it be saved? https://maxkol.org/iconic-postmodern-new-york-lobby-doomed-to-destruction-can-it-be-saved/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 14:09:06 +0000 https://maxkol.org/iconic-postmodern-new-york-lobby-doomed-to-destruction-can-it-be-saved/ Deep in the narrow canyons of the financial epicenter of the West lies a misplaced but neglected courtyard that is as idyllic and awe-inspiring as the whimsical gardens of the East. Located on land between Pine Street and Wall Street in New York City is a postmodern corporate style juggernaut — 60 Wall Street, at […]]]>

Deep in the narrow canyons of the financial epicenter of the West lies a misplaced but neglected courtyard that is as idyllic and awe-inspiring as the whimsical gardens of the East. Located on land between Pine Street and Wall Street in New York City is a postmodern corporate style juggernaut — 60 Wall Street, at one time the tallest corporate building in the city’s financial district.

The skyscraper, including its distinctive lobby, was designed by the late Irish-born architect and protégé of Eero Saarinen Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo of Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates, also known for the Ford Foundation and the expansion in 1967 of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. , both notable for their impressive interior gardens. 60 Wall Street is a mix of architectural styles that changes shape; As the architects of the Art Deco movement did at the turn of the 20th century, Roche embellished his work with ancient motifs filtered through the prism of modern engineering: the exterior is a fusion of Greek Revival elements, neoclassical and postmodern, with their intricate structural ornamentation details modulated as simpler forms.

60 The current private public space of Wall Street, designed by Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo in 1989. Photograph courtesy of KRJDA.

Pillar rooms of twin 70-foot-tall stone columns anchor the base of the 51-story tower, creating the illusion of a granite curtain framing the entrances to the north and south. Within this facade, an architectural colonnade transfers passage to a monumental atrium designated by the city as “private public space,” a type of zoning regulatory incentive that grants additional airspace and floor space in exchange. of a usable open space dedicated to the enjoyment of the public. The styling of this interior alludes to Mughal design: it is a winter garden with ornate octagonal columns supporting mirrored ceilings framed in white trellis, inducing a reflective kaleidoscopic effect that Roche is known to use.

Photograph courtesy of KRJDA.

The atrium offers an escape from the claustrophobia of the financial district. In the morning, a crowd of rush hour workers rush there to get to their offices and for the rest of the day a mix of people from all walks of life congregates under the seasonal plantings and ornamental white stones of 20 feet tall that adorn its interior walls.

As all architectural styles have done at some point, postmodernism goes through its own personal phase of rejection by the status quo. A glove of renovations disguised as “updates” by real estate developers who view the style as outdated, undesirable for modern business rental and therefore, in theory, bad for the bottom line, have occurred in such spaces. across the United States in recent years, including the destruction of the AT&T building atrium at 550 Madison and the Hall of Gems and Minerals at the American Museum of Natural History, both in New York City.

60 Wall Street, completed 1989. Photograph courtesy of KRJDA.

60 Wall Street faces a similar fate. Its current occupant, Deutsche Bank, will move to the Time Warner Center in Columbus Circle in the coming months. Recent lease changes have left 60 Wall Street vulnerable to sweeping renovations: part of the ownership group, the Paramount Group, has already redeveloped another KRJDA lobby in the old Deutsche Bank building on West 52nd Street, Stripping it off of any unique quality in favor of something more sterile and considerably bland. It was, in my opinion, a tragic loss of one of New York’s most beautiful spaces, one that should never happen again.

However, the Paramount Group has construction plans, slated to begin in the summer of 2022, to demolish the 60 Wall Street atrium inside and out in favor of a narrow skylight and a 100-foot-high green wall designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox. Additionally, the exterior stone colonnade will be targeted for an intense update to the point of being totally unrecognizable, despite its overt charm and attention to detail. To hail these cliché design decisions as “new” and “alive” comes at the cost of yet another huge blow to Roche’s historic genius legacy.

The KRJDA design of the 60 Wall Street atrium is loved by many fans of the postmodern movement who, time and time again, are faced with the need to justify its continued architectural existence, as iconic examples of the era are systematically misunderstood. and destroyed. In 2018, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building became New York’s youngest landmark; However, his designation was purely external and couldn’t stop the fate of his beloved PoMo lobby. Without better preservation of these works of art, we face a bleak future: one without style and deprived of unique architectural experiences.

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Photographer takes a serious look at child’s play – KION546 https://maxkol.org/photographer-takes-a-serious-look-at-childs-play-kion546/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 05:06:03 +0000 https://maxkol.org/photographer-takes-a-serious-look-at-childs-play-kion546/ Oscar Holland, CNN For over a decade, Nancy Richards Farese has captured heartwarming images of children around the world, from Burkina Faso to Honduras, Ethiopia to Spain. Throughout her travels, the American photographer has observed a common trait that seems to transcend cultures: “They play,” she said on a video call from Boston, “despite what’s […]]]>

Oscar Holland, CNN

For over a decade, Nancy Richards Farese has captured heartwarming images of children around the world, from Burkina Faso to Honduras, Ethiopia to Spain. Throughout her travels, the American photographer has observed a common trait that seems to transcend cultures: “They play,” she said on a video call from Boston, “despite what’s going on”.

There is perhaps no better illustration of this than Farese’s photos of the sprawling Cox’s Bazar refugee camp in Bangladesh, home to hundreds of thousands of people displaced by Myanmar Rohingya crisis. Amid the trials, she documented children blowing windmills and pulling a water jug ​​as a makeshift toy with wheels and an old rope.

“You go there to photograph all of this trauma and hardship, and yet you realize, ‘Oh, the kids are sliding down a hill of mud; they created these amazing and elaborate games with bottle caps and shoes; or they made kites or trucks from found bottles and old cassettes, ”she said. “The other adults and I had a sense of how serious this (situation) was, and yet the children were actually doing something, quite naturally, to help them heal themselves.”

Farese new book brings together nearly 100 photos she took examining children’s games in 14 countries. His young subjects play chess in Jordan and monopoly in Cuba; they jump, turn around and run with abandon; they kick and throw balls, climb and jump ropes. Dolls and kites are recurring features, while jacks and throwing games are seemingly global – albeit with different names and props.

“One of the most ubiquitous games is what in Haiti they called ‘circle’,” she said. “This is where they roll a tire and then use a cable to control it. You see it ubiquitous in Ethiopia and Bangladesh. I tried to do it, just pick it up and run along the road with the kids. It’s super tough, but it’s also a lot of fun. Immediately you have to really focus, you are laughing and there is competitiveness.

Perhaps the universality and familiarity of these games is why her photos resonate with so many people, she said, adding, “We see it (and) we understand the joy of the moment.”

A right to play

The title of the book, “Potential Space”, was inspired by the famous pediatrician and psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott, who used the term to describe a space between person and experience – between imagination and reality – which promotes creativity and culture. The caption of her book, “A Serious Look at Child’s Play,” alludes to the photographer’s constant interest in developmental science.

After studying the importance of play as a companion at Harvard Kennedy School, Farese also works with the charity CARE International and the National Institute of Play, which said playing encourages innovation, creativity, flexibility, adaptability and problem solving later in life. University research in the field has shown benefits for children ranging from improved coping skills to bigger empathy.

“We kind of dismiss (the importance of playing), but when you talk to scientists or theorists they understand it as one of the most basic things we’ve ever done in our life,” said the photograph. “It completely shapes our emotional, social, physical and internal landscapes. It’s just fascinating to realize that our abilities to collaborate, to cooperate, to understand tolerance and inclusion are just simple aspects of development that we practice in a tag game. And they are vitally important.

Playing is not only beneficial for the intellectual and emotional development of children: it is a human right consecrated in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Acts of cooperation and compromise can also help build values ​​essential to the functioning of democracies, Farese suggested.

“The basic premise of the game is that the goal is just to keep the game going,” she said. “And (the kids) are learning to do it. So, is there a threat to the way we see ourselves in a democracy if we don’t learn and practice the basic skills to level the playing field and include others? “

There are many insidious threats to play, in developing countries as well as in developed countries. Although Farese largely eschews technology in her uplifting imagery, she is a fierce criticism of how phones and tablets encroach on traditional forms of entertainment. And in the West, she added, fears about safety and parental pressure to be “productive” have resulted in “the diminishing role of people allowing their children to play aimlessly – to just go out and play. “

The photographer also argues that consumerism encourages children to think of play as synonymous with toys, to the point that “it doesn’t occur to them to play without a toy,” she said.

His photos suggest that material things aren’t a prerequisite for fun, whether it’s kids playing in a Massachusetts water fountain or a boy inspecting his own shadow in Haiti.

“They don’t have a lot of toys there,” she said of a remote school where she took this last photo. “And it was amazing how much joy they drew from the shadows.”

Not just for kids

Working with children can pose unique challenges, especially for photographers who hope to capture candid, unattended moments.

“The interesting thing about going out on the court with a camera in these situations is that the kids immediately flock to you – and they want to see your toy, if you want to,” Farese said, adding, “You want that. they don’t see you., and do whatever they’re going to do. I think the trick is to make yourself as boring as possible… You start writing or looking at something on your camera and you shoot with it. The attention span of children is not that long, so they are not going to spend a lot of time with you.

Photography is, however, an “inherently fun activity,” she said. And as her attempts to push the tires reveal, Farese often finds herself inadvertently involved in her subjects’ games. Indeed, his advocacy for the benefits of play is not limited to children.

“Humans are neurologically developed to be able to play for their entire lives,” she said. “And yet, socially, we have these ideas that it’s a cinch, and we shouldn’t be doing it – that it’s a waste of time and it’s not productive.”

“We travel the world every day with this treasure trove of deep memories both visual and emotional,” she added. “What if we allowed ourselves to play like a regular practice – to be creative, inclusive, to set aside even five minutes each day as a time when we are in nature, or… where the goal is to give up your sense of identity? “

Potential space: a serious look at child’s play», Published by MW Editions, is available now.

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™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

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Xposure 2022 exhibitions celebrate culture, adventure, beauty and more https://maxkol.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-celebrate-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 09:02:06 +0000 https://maxkol.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-celebrate-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a leading global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that transcend genres and formats, and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity. First held over seven days February 9-15 at […]]]>

Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a leading global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that transcend genres and formats, and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity.

First held over seven days February 9-15 at Expo Center Sharjah, the annual Sharjah Photography Celebration will host solo and group exhibitions showcasing a diverse range of photographic talent, including emerging contemporary photographers. and established all over the world.

Group exhibitions

Emirates Falcons Photography Society speaks to the souls of viewers through “Desert” which showcases the natural environment and beauty of the Arabian Desert, while “PSA Omnibus” features works primarily by members of the local chapter of the Photographic Society of America (PSA).

Photographers from around the world whose photos best express the idea that our future lies in peaceful coexistence will be featured in the “Global Peace Photo Award” exhibition, while the images under “Siena International Photography Awards” feature works by professional and amateur photographers from all over the world.

“Into The Wild” is an exhibition by PhotoWalk Connect that explores wildlife photography through images of the rugged and rugged landscapes of Kenya’s Masai Mara and an exciting array of creatures large and small. In “Revolution” the visual evolution of the evolution of the pop style is summarized through the defining images of the 1960s by three photographers – Terry O’Neill, Gered Mankowitz and Ed Caraeff.

The fascinating collection of images under “Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY)” describes different styles of photography including reportage, editorial, advertising, documentary and offers insight into the stories behind these award-winning photographs.

Personal exhibitions

Steve McCurry’s most memorable collection of works showcasing the perfect combination of light, composition and tone and which conveys the essence of humanity is part of a retrospective titled “Iconic”. These images, shot over four decades, tell stories that transcend the boundaries of language and culture.

Famous photojournalist James Nachtwey’s “Unvanquished” gives a human face to the social and political narratives of our time and documents the history being drawn through four decades of capturing conflict, disaster and disease across the world, while destruction and the humanitarian tragedy of war and its impact on human lives is eloquently portrayed in “Life and War” by Muhammed Muheisen and “Inside the war on ISIS” by Jana Andert.

Michel Rawicki offers an in-depth look at a region of the planet at the heart of climate change in “Call of the Cold”; Omar Havana talks about the struggles and resilience of the Nepalese people following a devastating earthquake in “Endurance”; Lurie Belegurschi captures the retreating Icelandic glaciers in “Iceland: the land of fire and ice”; and Jordan Hammond shows the diversity of life found on the islands of Bali, Java and Sumbawa in “Indonesia”.

Ibrahim Iqbal, based in Bangladesh, raises issues of universal health care, disease prevention and unmet needs of lower socio-economic strata of “Aamar Hospital”; Garcia de Marina’s “Innocents” are a symbolic representation of prejudices and injustices in society; while in ‘Argish. Long way home ‘, Daniel Kordan captures the annual migration of people from the Yamal region of Russia.

George Georgiou has toured 24 US cities spanning 26 parades to bring people, families, movement and a sea of ​​sound to life in “Americans Parade”; Frank Fournier portrays the fiery charm of New York City in the mid-1970s in ‘Red Eye’; while Tariq Zaidi reveals the fashion culture of the capitals of Congo Kinshasa and Congo Brazzaville in “Sapeurs: Mesdames et Messieurs du Congo”.

Chris Rainier observes the deep spiritual significance and powerful relationship of cultures around the world with ‘Mask’ and Biljana Jurukovski shares the beauty of body painting and extravagant decorations of the Omo Valley tribes in Africa in ‘Tribal Muses – The Vanguard of the Tribal World ‘.

Kiran Ridley documents the human face of a social movement in “Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests: The Revolution of Our Time”; Images by Gonçalo Fonseca covering a period of 5 years show “How Portugal won the war on drugs”; Diego Ibarra Sánchez’s “The Phoenician Collapse” is an intimate examination of the complex Lebanese social mosaic at the time of an ongoing national economic crisis; and “Welcome to Camp America: Inside Guantánamo Bay” by Debi Cornwall is a compelling exhibit marked by empathy and dark humor that investigates the human experience of prisoners and detention center guards.

The empty streets of Moscow – once a metropolis that never slept – become a visual metaphor for the changes brought about by the 2020 pandemic in Sergey Ponomarev’s “Moscow: The Great Void”; while Alan Schaller focuses on the moments of positivity during COVID-19 in ‘Life Must Go On’.

Mogens Trolle zooms in on the faces and eyes of primates to capture their unique personalities in “Eye Contact”; Alain Schroeder launches a call to “Save the orangutans”; Aaron Gekoski emphasizes human-animal conflict to portray “Wildlife in Crisis”; Jasper Doest focuses on a Caribbean flamingo to highlight the importance of protecting wildlife in “Meet Bob”; and through ‘The Photo Ark’, Joel Sartore documents the amazing diversity of the world to inspire people to help save endangered species before it’s too late.

“Andrew Prokos: New Abstraction” features award-winning images of the art photographer’s large-scale architectural abstract prints; “Steven Brooke: Views of Rome & Miami” is the architectural photographer’s unique take on historic architecture and neighborhoods in two magnificent cities; Majid Al Bastaki captures the beauty of the UAE in “Now and then – Celebrating 50 Golden Years”; while in ‘Uncluttered Sobriety II’, Sajin Sasidharan uses strong contrast in minimalist scenes to reveal incredible architectural details.

The beauty of macro photography comes to life in “The Hidden Beauty of Seeds and Fruits” by visual artist Levon Biss; Vineet Vohra transforms familiar scenes into something poetic and mystical in “Serendipity”; and “UAE Female Falconers: Breaking Stereotypes” by Vidhyaa Chandramohan evocatively captures the minds of Emirati women entering a historically male-dominated hobby.

Four ocean explorers, researchers and storytellers will showcase the beauty and devastation that occurs in all ocean ecosystems through a series of exhibits titled “Ocean Mysteries”, “Our Water Planet”, “Secrets of the Whales” and “Two Worlds” – Above and Below the Sea ‘. Underwater photographers drawing attention to marine conservation include Brian Skerry, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes and Laurent Ballesta

-Ends-

© Press release 2022

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The mystery of the Luristan bronzes still intrigues archaeologists https://maxkol.org/the-mystery-of-the-luristan-bronzes-still-intrigues-archaeologists/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 11:39:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-mystery-of-the-luristan-bronzes-still-intrigues-archaeologists/ When exquisite bronze figurines began to flood the antique market in the late 1920s, no one knew much about them. Artworks depicting figures and animals, embossed bronze cups and delicate pins delighted merchants, who were impressed with their beauty. Inquiries have been made as to their origins, but the answers were somewhat vague. Rather than […]]]>

When exquisite bronze figurines began to flood the antique market in the late 1920s, no one knew much about them. Artworks depicting figures and animals, embossed bronze cups and delicate pins delighted merchants, who were impressed with their beauty. Inquiries have been made as to their origins, but the answers were somewhat vague. Rather than naming a particular colony or civilization, traders would only point to one region of the Zagros Mountains: Luristan (located in western Iran and known today as Lorestan).

The Luristan Bronzes Flood began in the fall of 1928 in the sleepy town of Harsin, about 20 miles east of Kermanshah. A local farmer discovered several beautiful bronze objects in his fields and sold them. Word of his finds spread and soon the city filled with merchants who bought these works of art and then resold them to museums and private collections. It was a profitable arrangement that suited many parties, and very little was done to stop it.

Great interest in the excavation of these bronzes arose among academics and locals. André Godard, the director of the Iranian Archaeological Service in 1928, described the method used by the inhabitants to detect a site to be excavated. They first found a source. Once this was located there was a high probability of finding a nearby settlement with a cemetery. The formula was simple and effective: look for a source of water, and an ancient necropolis will not be far away.

(The first superpower in history arose out of ancient Iran.)

Archaeologists in the air

The first Western archaeologist to investigate the bronzes was German-born archaeologist Erich Schmidt, who began exploring Luristan in 1935. His work at the site was innovative thanks to his wife, Mary Helen. The two shared a passion for archeology: they first met while visiting the Tepe Hissar site in Iran.

Mary Helen advocated the use of airplanes to explore sites from above, and she purchased one for missions. Name it Friend of Iran, the plane surveyed Luristan and other Iranian sites, including Persepolis (the former capital of the Persian Empire), which Schmidt would study. After obtaining clearance from Iran, reconnaissance flights flew in 1935-36 and again in 1937. Schmidt’s aerial photography would prove invaluable not only for documenting sites but also for methodically planning them. excavations.

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22nd Annual NH Society of Photographic Artists Exhibition https://maxkol.org/22nd-annual-nh-society-of-photographic-artists-exhibition/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 16:22:30 +0000 https://maxkol.org/22nd-annual-nh-society-of-photographic-artists-exhibition/ EXETER – The 22nd Annual Membership Exhibition of the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists (NHSPA) will take place January 9-30 at the Exeter Town Hall Gallery (Saturdays and Sundays 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. h). The opening reception will take place on Sunday January 9 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Many photographers will […]]]>

EXETER – The 22nd Annual Membership Exhibition of the New Hampshire Society of Photographic Artists (NHSPA) will take place January 9-30 at the Exeter Town Hall Gallery (Saturdays and Sundays 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. h).

The opening reception will take place on Sunday January 9 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Many photographers will be present and available to answer questions about their work.

This year’s featured image is a handmade platinum / palladium print titled “Harbor Beach Stone # 45” by fine art photographer Jay Goldsmith. “The print is one of a larger series of fascinating and beautiful formations found in the rocks of Harbor Beach in York, Maine,” Goldsmith said.

The method he used to make his print is a historic “handmade” photographic process called “platinum / palladium”. Prints are created by sandwiching a large format negative and a piece of fine art paper. This paper, having been coated with a mixture of salts and platinum (and / or palladium), is exposed under very bright ultraviolet light and developed in a bath to remove the salts. This leaves only the platinum metal embedded between the fibers of the paper. The image does not rest on the surface of the paper, as with inkjet printing.

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students participate in the launch of our community foundation | News https://maxkol.org/students-participate-in-the-launch-of-our-community-foundation-news/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:23:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/students-participate-in-the-launch-of-our-community-foundation-news/ The work of Washington High School students to develop an identity and web presence for our community foundation is a big boost in the development of a new stand-alone community foundation in Daviess County. In November, local leaders announced a plan to bring control of the Daviess County Community Foundation, an affiliate of the Community […]]]>

The work of Washington High School students to develop an identity and web presence for our community foundation is a big boost in the development of a new stand-alone community foundation in Daviess County.

In November, local leaders announced a plan to bring control of the Daviess County Community Foundation, an affiliate of the Community Foundation Alliance, Inc. based in Evansville, Daviess County. The plan requires several elements to be separated from the affiliate agreement. One of them is to form a new community foundation in Daviess County.

“Because we are a new community foundation, we create everything,” says Joe Singleton, president of the new stand-alone community foundation called Our Community Foundation. “In addition to policies and procedures, we needed everything from a logo to a website. “

The Washington High School students and their teachers were ready to take on the task of creating a logo and website for the new foundation.

“The students at Washington High School have worked with the Foundation to develop a long list of tools that we can use to develop our identity and our website,” said Mary Smith, Executive Director of Our Community Foundation. “We are very grateful for their efforts. “

Smith says Evan Stoll’s marketing class, Jenilee Counsil’s art class, and DeWayne Shake’s broadcasting students worked together to develop a website for our community foundation. The development of the website includes a long list of projects.

“These include communication tools like colors, organization and web design, logos, photos, videos, and font styles,” says Smith. “We are impressed with all of their work and what they have developed so far. It’s very clear to us that they researched what community foundations do and then came up with ideas on how best to tell our story to our community and beyond.

Several Foundation Board members reviewed their work and provided input along the way.

“It’s been very exciting,” says Paula Jones, who previously worked in graphic design and marketing and is now secretary of the board of directors of Our Community Foundation. “Working in partnership with these students to build the Foundation from scratch has been very helpful. We are grateful to be part of the Washington High School Project-Based Learning Program.

Evan Stoll, WHS marketing professor agreed with Jones and said the experience was a great way for students to use their skills. “The creation of the website has been a great way for the students to gain hands-on, hands-on experience in the world of marketing, especially in the area of ​​promotion. They did a great job and we will be able to reflect on this project as we move forward in our studies. “

Jenilee Counsil, WHS art teacher also agreed, “Working with our community foundation has been an incredible experience. Students were able to use their digital art skills and collaborate to create art that will have an important cause. “

For WHS Senior Kenli Barber, the experience not only helped her use her skills, but also broadened her understanding of Daviess County and the work of a community foundation. “I had the opportunity to combine my marketing and photography skills that I learned in each of these courses and put them into practice in the ‘real world! Their nonprofit is a great organization, and this was especially brought to my attention during this project. They serve our community in more ways than we ever imagined. Working with Our Community Foundation has been an honor this semester.

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Explore the symbolism behind Picasso’s painting “Guernica” https://maxkol.org/explore-the-symbolism-behind-picassos-painting-guernica/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:03:45 +0000 https://maxkol.org/explore-the-symbolism-behind-picassos-painting-guernica/ As one of the most famous artists in the history of Western art, Pablo Picasso is known for his remarkably prolific career which spanned 79 years and included several disciplines. In particular, his paintings have undergone several stylistic evolutions such as cubism and surrealism, reflecting the artist’s permanent need to push the limits. And while […]]]>

As one of the most famous artists in the history of Western art, Pablo Picasso is known for his remarkably prolific career which spanned 79 years and included several disciplines. In particular, his paintings have undergone several stylistic evolutions such as cubism and surrealism, reflecting the artist’s permanent need to push the limits. And while many of Picasso’s paintings are known for their pioneering appearances, only one is known for its powerful anti-war message: the 1937 painting, Guernica.

Measuring approximately 11 feet tall and 25 feet wide, this massive piece of work is visually striking in its scale, composition, and unusual grayscale palette. Its dark subject was fueled by the Nazi bombing of the Basque town of Guernica in northern Spain during the Spanish Civil War. The work was then used by the Spanish government to help raise awareness about the war and raise the necessary funds.

Here we will learn more about the historical context in which Guernica was made before analyzing the anti-war symbolism within the painting.

Who was Picasso?

Photo by Pablo Picasso

Photograph by Pablo Picasso, 1962 (Photo: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons)

Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish child prodigy who began his creative career at the age of thirteen. As he continued to make art, his realistic and academic approach to painting waned, while other, more imaginative styles became increasingly important. His work can be traced through eight different periods: realist, blue period, pink period, African, cubism, surrealism, neoclassicism, and later works. Picasso used each of these distinct approaches to explore aesthetics, figurative subjects, emotions, and reality. He is considered one of the most influential figures in modern art.

Commissioning Guernica and its historical context

Ruins of Guernica

Photograph of the ruins of Guernica, 1937 (Photo via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0 de)

In 1937, Picasso, who lived and worked in France, was commissioned by the Spanish republican government to create a work of art for the Spanish pavilion at the upcoming Universal Exhibition in Paris.

Meanwhile, Spain was in the midst of a civil war between Republicans and Nationalists. The Basque town of Guernica was one of the bases of the republican movement, as well as a center of Basque culture. For this reason, the city was targeted by nationalists assisted by the Nazis and bombed on April 26, 1937, for two hours.

dora-maar-picasso-working-on-guernica-1937-a

Shortly after the tragedy, Picasso was encouraged by a close friend to make the attack the purpose of the commission. Picasso immersed himself in reports of the atrocities and, horrified by the state of his home country, began working on a large-scale painting based on the event.

The piece was completed in just 35 days.

Analyse of Guernica

Guernica - Picasso

Composition

Since the commission was originally intended to be a mural for the World’s Fair, Guernica was designed as a very large canvas (approximately 11 feet by 25 feet). Picasso opted for a matte house paint so the room had little to no gloss, and he chose a limited palette of black, gray, and white to mimic the effect of black and white photography.

Guernica represents the after the bombardment in a contained space. From left to right: a distraught mother mourns her dead child; a bull rises above his shoulder with a blank or shocked expression; wounded horse screams in pain as dead soldier is trapped under his body; two women watch the scene in amazement; and another woman is trapped in a fire and screams.

Style

Guernica (Picasso)

As part of Picasso’s later work, Guernica exhibits qualities from different stylistic periods, but more particularly, cubist and surrealist characteristics. The range of different human and animal subjects is spread across the entire canvas, their shapes distorted into dreamlike versions of themselves. Most the numbers overlap, creating more shapes and narratives in these additional spaces.

Symbolism

Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973) - 1937 Guernica (Prado, Madrid)

While the anti-war message of Guernica is clear, the specifics of the painting’s symbolism are still debated among art historians. The bull and the horse, for example, are both important subjects in Picasso’s work, but have also been theorized as important figures who perhaps embody people or ideals.

Others have pointed out that using grayscale gives the impression of desolation and torment and the crowded and chaotic composition means oppression. Likewise, the torsion shapes of bodies have been interpreted as a expression in the face of adversity, fire is seen as the destructive power of war, and the dismembered arm holding the broken sword is representative of the people defeat.

Picasso said of the symbolism of the painting: “It is not for the painter to define the symbols. Otherwise, it would be better if he wrote them in so many words! The audience viewing the image should interpret the symbols as they understand them.

Legacy of Guernica

led mural

After Guernica, it was used during the World’s Fair to raise awareness of the Spanish Civil War. The painting was later sent to the United States to help raise funds for the Spanish refugees. Picasso said that Guernica was not to be returned to Spain until she had reestablished a republic. Finally, in 1981, the monumental piece was transferred to its country of origin.

Today it can be seen at the Reina Sofía Museum in Madrid.

Related Articles:

10 surprising facts about Pablo Picasso

The evolution of Picasso’s painting style and what each artistic choice represents

9 facts about Picasso’s revolutionary painting ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’

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Give them a chance to shoot https://maxkol.org/give-them-a-chance-to-shoot/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:37:42 +0000 https://maxkol.org/give-them-a-chance-to-shoot/ Photography may be one of the most talked about hobbies around the world, but it’s mostly reserved for people who can afford to travel and buy the latest gear. Most of us are hobbyists finding different topics to click on from interesting angles on our cell phones. Of course, mobile photography has helped advance the […]]]>

Photography may be one of the most talked about hobbies around the world, but it’s mostly reserved for people who can afford to travel and buy the latest gear. Most of us are hobbyists finding different topics to click on from interesting angles on our cell phones. Of course, mobile photography has helped advance the spirit of photography to a great extent, but you wouldn’t expect kids in everyday bets to click photos on their iPhones and post on social media the hashtag #ShotOniPhone.

In order to bridge this gap and bring the less fortunate into the world of photography, the Museo Camera Center for the Photographic Arts recently organized a “Mobile Photography Workshop” on the theme of “The Art of Storytelling”.

“This exhibit was all about how they tell the world the everyday stories they see in their lives.”

Workshops were organized in collaboration with Saksham Bal Vikas Sanstha and Shiksha Education Center, charities committed to providing education – academic and vocational – to disadvantaged children.

Thanks to these programs, 22 children from disadvantaged backgrounds from neighboring villages of Gurugram, Chakkarpur, Jharsa, Wazirabad, Nathupur and from a village in Rajasthan to Mandwa, were chosen and equipped with iPhone 12 to create photo reports. They were given a mix of theoretical and practical classes in mobile photography and encouraged to develop their own unique photographic styles.

Aditya Arya, photographer, founder of Museo.

“You will be surprised to know the backgrounds of these children. They belong to the economically backward sectors of our society. We provided them with an iPhone 12 with the right training and were amazed at the kind of stories they told through their photographs. This exhibit was all about how they tell the world the everyday stories they see in their lives, ”said Aditya Arya, photographer and founder of Museo.

It gives us great pleasure to bridge the economic gap in photography through this workshop. These kids now have the confidence to pick up a camera, film and create their own stories, ”he added.

Museo Camera in Gurugram has over 18,000 square feet of space dedicated to the art and history of photography and is claimed to be India’s premier center for the photographic arts.

“At the start of the class, Sir and Mam always say control the exposure but I don’t even know what the exposure is, but now I have learned and still try to control it… Sir will also say his points of sight and I like it very much, ”shared Himani Narang of Saksham Bal Vikas Sanstha, Gurugram, who participated in this workshop.

Museo Camera in Gurugram has over 18,000 square feet of space dedicated to the art and history of photography and is claimed to be India’s premier center for the photographic arts. They feature a collection of over 2,500 cameras and other photographic equipment dating back to the 1850s. Museo Camera is the largest non-profit photography museum in Southeast Asia.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and news on the coronavirus here.

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The North Face x Gucci Launches New Styles, Plans Pop-Up Shops – WWD https://maxkol.org/the-north-face-x-gucci-launches-new-styles-plans-pop-up-shops-wwd/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 12:01:16 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-north-face-x-gucci-launches-new-styles-plans-pop-up-shops-wwd/ COLD SHOULDER: For the second installment of its partnership and collaborative collection with The North Face, Gucci is playing on exploration and avant-garde design in a new campaign. This sense of adventure and preparation for all weather elements was exemplified in a new campaign which debuts today. Gucci Creative Director Alessandro Michele designed the campaign […]]]>

COLD SHOULDER: For the second installment of its partnership and collaborative collection with The North Face, Gucci is playing on exploration and avant-garde design in a new campaign.

This sense of adventure and preparation for all weather elements was exemplified in a new campaign which debuts today. Gucci Creative Director Alessandro Michele designed the campaign which was photographed and directed by twins Jalan and Jibril Durimel. Christopher Simmons was artistic director, Thomas De Kluyver took care of make-up and Andrea Martinelli did hairstyling.

A look from The North Face x Gucci campaign shot in Iceland.
Jalan and Jibril Durimel / Courtesy of Gucci

The photos and video were shot in Iceland, a country known for its majestic nature. There, models were photographed across a variety of terrains, including white snow-covered backdrops, black volcanic sand, and more pastoral green hills. Durimels imagery is used for all marketing channels including social media, online, and e-commerce. The big brands are continuing their outdoor photography – the first campaign was carried out by Daniel Shea in the Alps.

The latest assortment from The North Face x Gucci includes insulated jackets, ready-to-wear, backpacks, bombers, vests, hiking boots, luggage and shoes for women and men. Some styles sport the classic GG monogram throughout, and there are new interpretations of some of The North Face’s iconic ’90s looks, which have been reimagined in colorful prints inspired by the Gucci archives.

Next month, shoppers in select winter cities will find the collection, designed to withstand the elements, in pop-up stores. From January 11 to 25, there will be outposts in Aspen, Chicago and Toronto. Aspen is a popular destination this season. Gabriela Hearst unveiled a pop-up in the ski resort, where new label AspenX, Citizens of Humanity and Loro Piana Interiors have shops.

A nod to both brands’ environmental efforts, the new line uses Econyl, a branded nylon fabric made from regenerated materials like fishing nets. Additionally, all down insulation used in the second round is certified to the Responsible Down Standard by Control Union.

Buyers won’t miss the line’s bright pink packaging, featuring the The North Face x Gucci logo. All the paper and cardboard used come from sustainably managed forest sources. Uncoated paper has been used to make it fully recyclable. Another indicator of the eco-responsible approach is the fact that the boxes are designed with handles to avoid the need for shopping bags.

It is not yet clear when the final season is due and if an extension of the collaboration is envisaged.

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