Photography styles – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 01:43:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Photography styles – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 The Tumblr Generation of the Rise of Fashion https://maxkol.org/the-tumblr-generation-of-the-rise-of-fashion/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 12:00:15 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-tumblr-generation-of-the-rise-of-fashion/ First row (left to right): Ethan James Green (photographer and director), Martine Gutierrez (artist), Peter Goldberg (archivist), Christopher Barnard (writer), Marcus Cuffie (stylist), Fernando Cerezo (artist), Stevie Triano (office worker) and Marcs Goldberg ( artistic director). Last row: Iris Diane Palma (artist), Chuy Medina (studio director and photographer), Dara Allen (fashion director and model), Devan […]]]>

First row (left to right): Ethan James Green (photographer and director), Martine Gutierrez (artist), Peter Goldberg (archivist), Christopher Barnard (writer), Marcus Cuffie (stylist), Fernando Cerezo (artist), Stevie Triano (office worker) and Marcs Goldberg ( artistic director). Last row: Iris Diane Palma (artist), Chuy Medina (studio director and photographer), Dara Allen (fashion director and model), Devan Díaz (writer), Sonny Molina (hairdresser) and Cruz Valdez (photographer).
Photo: Cruz Valdez

The Tumblr fashion kids came to New York, as fashion lovers often do, from the less fashionable provinces: San Jose and Grand Rapids and Baltimore and Orange County and Jersey Shore. Growing up far from industry enclaves, they were obsessed with Balenciaga advertisements and Vogue Italy scans online, following the zeal of strangers, and found their like-minded fanatics to befriend. A decade later, they’re all living in New York, and they’re still friends. They socialize together and party together, and now, after moving from outside digital to inside the industry, they work together too. “The first time I met all the dolls, it was clear, it was a tight bunch of ride-or-dies,” says artist Martine Gutierrez, who met her crew in the city following of one Candy magazine shoot in 2016 and quickly fell into it.

They’ve come a long way since they were on Tumblr, the image-centric blogging platform, in the 2010s as fashion-obsessed teenagers. Perfectly mastering technology, controlling their own means of producing, distributing and promoting images: the girls of the Factory without needing a Warhol, the Halstonettes if they dispensed with Halston, the children of unholy love of Cleveland (Pat, not Ohio) and Vreeland. They internalized Polly Mellen raving about “the weightlessness, the pompom, the puff” fake furs in Unzipped and Donatella Versace making marble-mouthed statements in a vogue video interview (“What are you reading right now?” “Magazines!”). They live to be behind the camera and in front of it.

Without fashion school – in some cases, without even completing high school, let alone college – they trained in the chapter and verse of the industry, its history and archives as well as its lingua franca. Their styles were cooked in Tumblr’s mix-and-match, an infinitely referential crucible, and the most dedicated could spend five or six hours a day on the platform, posting and commenting. “After midnight, it was time to be out there,” says Devan Díaz, a writer who moved to New York from Tennessee at 18 and started her Tumblr in 2009. “If you go to bed really late, you can see the European crowd waking up.”

“If I didn’t have Tumblr, I never would have gotten into fashion,” says Marcus Cuffie, a stylist whose Tumblr, Dustulator (the name of a favorite Rick Owens collection), launched in 2011, has become a reference for many other bloggers. . “I wouldn’t have known how to access it.”

“I think we wanted to know why we liked the things we liked,” says Hari Nef, who moved to New York from Massachusetts to attend Columbia and joined Tumblr in the summer of 2011, just before he arrived. “We wanted to draw a line through the past to understand where it came from. Together we were able to thread that needle and thread it. It was about information, and it was about discovery – discovery that you couldn’t achieve without the community. Reblogs and comments led to chats and calls, and gradually a circle coalesced.

All research has paid off. Nef has interned at fashion hotspots like VFiles, though now she’s better known as an actress; she spent this spring filming Barbie film. (She deleted her Tumblr before the release of her first film in 2018.) Cuffie now dresses for Harper’s Bazaar, Dizzy, and a bag of independent magazines. Cruz Valdez, who became Cuffie’s partner and now collaborator, is a photographer who shoots for Marc Jacobs, Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty, and Eckhaus Latta. “These children to know things,” says Mel Ottenberg, editor-in-chief of Interview, who hired one of them, Dara Allen, known professionally as Dara (Tumblr born 2011), to be the magazine’s fashion director in February. “They really need to study.”

For young millennials and all of Gen Z, making friends online is simply how you make friends. But eventually this crew realized, you have to meet in real life if you want to do anything. Their Tumblr buddies were their support system, and they flocked to the town in formation to live, work, and play together. “I always wanted to come to New York, but I don’t think I would have,” Allen says. But goaded by fellow Californians Valdez and entertainer Iris Diane Palma, she bought a ticket with them (in tears) and moved for a flop to Bushwick. (Stevie Triano, another Tumblr friend, and Cuffie picked up the keys and met them the day they arrived.) Valdez, who went to photography school, got her first shots in their shared apartment in Brooklyn with a transparent backdrop attached by a belt. to their futon with Allen, who appeared in two Marc Jacobs shows before finally signing with a modeling agency, as a subject.

In New York, they met other Tumblrites, including Nef and Cuffie. “I really felt like we were all meant to get together,” Nef told me. “Word manifest was very popular at that time. And that’s what we felt like we were doing. Obsession alone wasn’t enough for me, Dara, Cruz, Marcus, Devan or any of us. It would just have been a waste for us to do anything but use up all those hours we spent watching, listening, writing and sharing and not trying to do anything with them.

They found themselves friends with model-turned-photographer Ethan James Green, and the circle grew. Green was a more laid back Tumblr user whose track career was cataloged on Tumblr – most comprehensively by Allen on his blog. His photography career had stalled until, inspired by his mentor David Armstrong, he began photographing black and white portraits of friends and future friends, including all of the people pictured here, many of whom are presented in his first book, Young New York. “All these great fashion people I’d been hanging out with for years were suddenly like, ‘Oh!‘ – it sparked something,” Green says. “People started asking me to do my photos. And because I was able to really create my world, I didn’t have to compromise. These days he shoots for vogue and OLouis Vuitton campaigns, and has just closed his first personal exhibition at Fotografiska.

Now they are part of the next generation of fashion and landing big jobs. Green often works with Allen. Allen often works with Valdez. Valdez often works with Cuffie, who is also his partner. Their friends attend the shootings or style or build the sets. Their work adorns Soho billboards for Calvin Klein; they are booked by Bottega Veneta and Alexander McQueen. The line between work and life can be blurred. They don’t work exclusively together, but they understand each other better when they do. “We all see it for each other. Our Grindr profile would say, “Muse 4 Muse,” says Gutierrez. “I constantly bring friends on projects, especially when there’s a budget.”

“There is of course a common language,” says Marcs Goldberg, art director who designs sets for photo shoots. “It’s kind of like a sibling relationship, where it can be very intense and extreme, but in the end, it’s exactly how it should be.”

They flourished individually and collectively, making room for themselves and their tastes. Many of them have transitioned from their first encounters on Tumblr or have adopted non-binary identities. “It opened up so many possibilities,” Valdez told me. “We all had such an instinct for something,” Allen says. “I think I’ve realized that it really becomes easier to go with your instincts – and your friends.” This year, she worked with Green on an ad campaign for Walmart. “Think of someone in Central America seeing style from their perspective, it’s really crazy,” says Green proudly.

To hear them say it, their work is no longer so different from their fit photos on Tumblr. “I think it was all about building and refining,” says Valdez. “When I think about my older work, it’s not like it was that drastically different, it’s just more about how I was able to articulate what I wanted to say and how to say it.” “That was me on Tumblr,” Allen shouted as he struck a pose for the camera, twisting his wrists outward and clutching his hands to his waist, a tall little teapot. Now their Tumblrs have mostly fallen – although a few still post privately or occasionally – and the platform itself has lost its former glory. The next generation gathers elsewhere.

But if their support has diminished, the message has not diminished. What would they do on their last day on earth? Probably that, they said, posing for this portrait. There is no “cheese” here. “Everyone says ‘pussy,'” Valdez said before the shutter went off. “Cat!” they all bellowed happily.

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Erik Ellington, the professional skateboarder designer of luxury shoes https://maxkol.org/erik-ellington-the-professional-skateboarder-designer-of-luxury-shoes/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 15:22:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/erik-ellington-the-professional-skateboarder-designer-of-luxury-shoes/ Human Recreational Services, Erik Ellington’s LA-based footwear brand, draws inspiration from the people, places and experiences of his professional skateboarding career. him to June 22, 2022 Who is it? Human Recreational Services is the fashion label of professional skateboarder Erik Ellington Why do I want it? Handcrafted luxury shoes that combine utilitarian comfort with bold […]]]>

Human Recreational Services, Erik Ellington’s LA-based footwear brand, draws inspiration from the people, places and experiences of his professional skateboarding career. him to


  1. Who is it? Human Recreational Services is the fashion label of professional skateboarder Erik Ellington
  2. Why do I want it? Handcrafted luxury shoes that combine utilitarian comfort with bold elegance
  3. Where can I find it? To humanrecreationalservices.com and resellers including Ssense, Level Shoes, The Webster and more

Who is it? A professional skateboarding career took Erik Ellington travel in the world. With magpie curiosity, he collected memories and stories from the different cultures he encountered along the way. Now with its label Human recreational servicesEllington seeks to translate these lived experiences into something tangible and universal through the design of luxury footwear.

Skateboarding provided common ground for Ellington’s nomadic childhood, but as he moved from state to state across the United States, he integrated the influences of different communities into his own personal style. “I pulled music that I was interested in, from metal in Alaska to 90s hip hop that I started getting into in Arizona, as well as skateboarders who were icons of the time, like Mark Gonzales,” says Ellington, who has learned to quickly adapt to each new environment. The passing experience fueled “his desire to really fight and to want to do something with what your resources are.”

Even when his skateboarding career took off, Ellington always strived to maintain a close connection with the surrounding communities. “When I’m touring around the United States or another country, I like meeting the local kids, riding skateboards,” says the designer, “I like the process of learning about people and what’s going on. ‘they do where I go.”

In 2017, after 35 years of skateboarding, Ellington founded his Human Recreational Services label, beginning with a line of luxury footwear designed for “acts of recreation” that tell the stories of the people, places and experiences his career made him discover. It is however not a skate brand. “The brand itself has almost nothing to do with skateboarding, except it has everything to do with the community and the foundation of the brand.”

In 2019, Ellington partnered with Parisian designer Vaz Rajan, who helped him refine his experiments and ideas into functional designs. Although the two share the creative direction and design aspects of the label, Ellington is the “hunter and gatherer, bringing people in and bringing the vision”, while Rajan “deciphers and orchestrates how it all comes together”.

Why do I want it? Ellington has no formal education in shoe design, but he has an unparalleled talent for observing and learning from those around him. His almost unorthodox entry into the world of luxury shoe design allowed him to eschew convention and design styles that combine utilitarian comfort with bold elegance. From checkered slip-on loafers in black and white pony hair to buttery leather high-top sneakers, designs often combine classic shapes with plush materials. Unlike the skate shoes Ellington previously used to design, which were disposable in nature, with Human Recreational Services, he cares about creating shoes that outlast trends and seasons in style and quality.

The current collection, titled Future Primitive, is the last “chapter” of the label. While the previous collection midnight diamond explored the invigorated sense of glamor and adventure that came with emerging from the pandemic, Primeval Future is an ode to the 90s era that Ellington grew up idolizing. With this collection, the designer “started to be a bit more liberal with influences from skateboarding. There are many distressing treatments and different paint applications. However, the shoes are all made from fine Italian leathers and handcrafted in a small factory in Tuscany – a far cry from the Southern California skate parks where the designer spent his youth.

Ellington’s sensible observance of human connection is the foundation of human recreational services. As the brand grows, the designer hopes to continue leveraging his personal experiences to create products, beyond shoes, that connect and expand his community. “It’s largely me learning the process along the way, putting it into a distinguished product that can be an example of what I’ve learned,” says the designer. “In a way, to share some of the experiences I’ve had in life through this.”

Where can I find it? To humanrecreationalservices.com and retailers such as Ssense, Level Shoes, The Webster and more.

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Kim Kardashian Weight Loss Photos: Transformation Pictures https://maxkol.org/kim-kardashian-weight-loss-photos-transformation-pictures/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:34:21 +0000 https://maxkol.org/kim-kardashian-weight-loss-photos-transformation-pictures/ Kim Kardashian has changed a lot since his family’s reality show keeping up with the Kardashians began in 2007, its weight fluctuating throughout its time in the public eye. The SKIMS founder spoke in a June 21, 2022 interview on the TODAY show about her major weight loss before the Met Gala 2022when she lost […]]]>

Kim Kardashian has changed a lot since his family’s reality show keeping up with the Kardashians began in 2007, its weight fluctuating throughout its time in the public eye.

The SKIMS founder spoke in a June 21, 2022 interview on the TODAY show about her major weight loss before the Met Gala 2022when she lost 16 pounds in three weeks to fit into Marilyn Monroe’s iconic dress.

“I saw it as a role and I really wanted to wear that dress,” Kim said. TODAY co-anchors Savannah Guthrie and Hoda Kotb. “It was really important to me,” she added.

For the glamorous evening, Kim wore the very Jean Louis dress that the late Hollywood icon wore in 1962 when she sang “Happy Birthday” to then-President John F. Kennedy. Kim attended the event with her boyfriend pete davidsonwho wore a simple black tuxedo.

Later in the interview, the reality TV star explained that since the event she maintained her slim figure and lost even more weight.

“Since then, I’ve continued to eat very healthy,” the mum-of-four said. “I’ve lost 21 pounds now. I’m not trying to lose more weight, but I have more energy than ever. I cut out so much sugar – a lot of junk food I was eating I hadn’t realized, like a lot of fried food. And I completely changed my lifestyle. Kim credits the radical change with teaching her “a lot about [her] lifestyle and [her] Mental Health.”

Although the The Kardashians star is proud of her transformation, some of her fans weren’t so happy with the move. After news broke of her rapid weight loss, Kim received backlash for losing so much weight in such a short time.

Kim defended her actions in a June interview with The New York Timesarguing that she “did nothing wrong”.

“I haven’t done anything unhealthy,” she explained and admitted that if she hadn’t been able to lose weight, she “just wouldn’t have been able to go, which doesn’t wouldn’t have mattered. It was just important for me to achieve that goal.

In addition to the negative comments she received for her rapid weight loss, Kim was also criticized for allegedly damaging the historic dress, which belongs to Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Despite the claims, Ripley’s refuted the charges and denied any damage to the garment. “The dress was in the same condition it started with,” Ripley’s vice president of publishing and licensing, Amanda Joiner, said in a statement that month.

Scroll to see photos of Kim’s weight loss over the years.

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Release Date, Cast, Trailer, and Everything We Know So Far https://maxkol.org/release-date-cast-trailer-and-everything-we-know-so-far/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/release-date-cast-trailer-and-everything-we-know-so-far/ After the recent release of his new album and Olivia Wildethe upcoming thriller, don’t worry darling, Harry Styles is set to appear in the lead role of the new British romantic drama, my policeman. The plot follows Tom, a gay policeman in 1950s Brighton who marries a schoolteacher, Marion, while simultaneously being in a relationship […]]]>

After the recent release of his new album and Olivia Wildethe upcoming thriller, don’t worry darling, Harry Styles is set to appear in the lead role of the new British romantic drama, my policeman.

The plot follows Tom, a gay policeman in 1950s Brighton who marries a schoolteacher, Marion, while simultaneously being in a relationship with a museum curator, Patrick. Their secrets are menacing and can ruin the lives of everyone involved.

The period film is based on the eponymous novel by Bethan Robert published in 2012 and staged by the director, Michel Grandage. The screenplay comes from the Oscar-nominated American screenwriter Ron Nyswaner who wrote the 1993 film philadelphia creamwhile Greg Berlanti, Philip Herd, Cora Palfrey, Robbie Rogersand Sarah Schecher serve as producers.

COLLIDER VIDEO OF THE DAY

In addition to styles, my policeman also stars Ripper Streetit is David Dawson and Emma Corrin of The crown fame, in the other main roles.

Ahead of the film’s October release, find out everything we know so far about my policeman. From the plot to the cast and characters, including the trailer, you will find all the details in the following guide.

Related:’Elvis’: Baz Luhrmann Explains Why Harry Styles Wasn’t Cast As Music Icon In Biopic

What is the release date of my detective?

my policeman is an Amazon Original Movie, which is getting both a theatrical and digital release. The film premieres for a limited theatrical release on October 21, 2022, followed by a streaming release on Amazon Prime Video on November 4, 2022.

Amazon Studios released the official trailer for the romantic drama on June 15, 2022. From what the trailer reveals, it seems my policeman will be an emotional roller coaster for the three main protagonists.

The clip opens with Tom and Patrick in the museum looking at a painting of a stormy ocean and Tom being asked by the curator about his thoughts on the painting. What appears to be his answer also serves as a euphemism for love. The following explanation from Patrick is an analogy of their emotions for each other, forbidden love, and he encourages Tom to let himself be carried away by the waves of these emotions.

The minute-long clip jumps back and forth in time and scenes highlighting the intense moments between Styles’ Tom and Dawson’s Patrick, and how Corrin’s Marion fits into the men’s relationship.

All we can say about the trailer is that my policeman is going to be a heartwarming and perhaps a little heartbreaking story of three people in love in a difficult social landscape.

Who is in the cast of my police officer?

my policeman starring Harry Styles, Emma Corrin, David Dawson, Gina McKee, Linus Roacheand Rupert Everett in major roles. The cast also includes André Tiernan, Kadiff Kirwan, Jack Bandeira, maddie rice, Dora Davis, Tristan Sturrockand many others in various roles.

Who are the confirmed characters in My Policeman?

Find out which characters the cast members are playing in the upcoming romantic drama –

Harry Styles as Tom Burgess – Tom is a gay police officer from Brighton who is in love with a museum curator.

Linus Roache plays the role of older Tom, who probably appears in the latter part of the story.

Emma Corrin as Marion Taylor – Marion is in love with Tom and eventually marries him, despite knowing he is gay and in love with another man.

Gina McKee plays an older version of Marion.

David Dawson as Patrick Hazlewood – Patrick is the museum curator who is in love with Tom. They share a very strong, long-lasting relationship, it seems.

Rupert Everett plays an older version of Patrick.

When is my policeman filming?

Principal photography for my policeman began in April 2021 and filming was carried out in various locations in London, Brighton and Hove.

What is my police officer’s background?

As mentioned earlier, the romance drama of the upcoming period is adapted from an eponymous novel. While the novel and the plot of the film are the same, the original novel would have been inspired by real characters and their life events. The real characters are novelist EM Forster and policeman Robert Buckingham. As described in an article in The Guardian,

“For several decades, EM Forster was embroiled in a love triangle with a policeman and his wife – an unconventional arrangement in which the novelist found happiness.”

The characters of Forster and Buckingham are quite similar to those of Tom and Patrick. And like the novelist and his companion, Tom and Patrick also have a considerable age gap. Even the character of Marion is inspired by Buckingham’s wife, May, who cared for Forster in his later years.


Related: ‘Don’t Worry Darling’ Gets Disturbing Motion Poster With Weird Audio Track

When is my policeman settled?

The story of my policeman is set in the 1950s and continues for a few decades into the future as there are also mentions of older versions of Tom, Patrick, and Marion. It is possible that the future timeline of the story takes place in the 90s as in the original novel.

What is my policeman’s story?

my policeman is set in the 1950s, at the height of the evolution of social culture, history and politics. Caught in the midst of the changing tides of time, a young policeman, Tom Burgess, falls in love with artistically minded museum curator, Patrick Hazelwood. Enter Marion, a teacher who falls in love with Tom. Considering the times they live in, Tom and Patrick’s love seems impossible, so he marries Marion, but never stops loving Patrick. And so begins a complex and turbulent journey of three young people as each of them navigates social change, emotional turmoil and unfulfilled love.

Even as the story progresses and time passes, the longing and regret they have experienced all their lives continues to envelop the three protagonists.

There is neither mystery nor suspense in the story of my policeman but rather a long and exhausting journey of life to discover. While we know what it is, we have yet to find out how each of the characters lives through their social identities while dealing with their emotions and self-discoveries, and how this upheaval in their lives ultimately comes to fruition. .

From what we understand, my policeman is going to be a moving portrait of love, freedom and forgiveness.

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3D rendering is now so good – is product photography obsolete? https://maxkol.org/3d-rendering-is-now-so-good-is-product-photography-obsolete/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:40:13 +0000 https://maxkol.org/3d-rendering-is-now-so-good-is-product-photography-obsolete/ Photorealistic 3D rendering is becoming an increasingly popular way for brands to market their products. Ben & Jerry’s is one of many big brands embracing 3D rendering techniques over traditional product photography because it takes less time, less staff, and ultimately saves money. silver. But where does that leave product photographers and is there still […]]]>

Photorealistic 3D rendering is becoming an increasingly popular way for brands to market their products. Ben & Jerry’s is one of many big brands embracing 3D rendering techniques over traditional product photography because it takes less time, less staff, and ultimately saves money. silver. But where does that leave product photographers and is there still a place for them in visual marketing?

3D rendering is a term that describes hyper-realistic creation in 3D space. It’s often used in designs so you can visualize what a final product would look like without having to build it. While 3D rendering requires highly skilled artists and designers to create realistic images with natural-looking textures, reflections and features, software such as Adobe Aero, Sensei and Dimensions allow your average Joe to create 3D rendered images much more easily.

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A photography exhibit tells the stories of automotive culture in NM https://maxkol.org/a-photography-exhibit-tells-the-stories-of-automotive-culture-in-nm/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:02:11 +0000 https://maxkol.org/a-photography-exhibit-tells-the-stories-of-automotive-culture-in-nm/ “Con Confianza, Nathalia Florez” by Jessica Roybal. (Courtesy of Jessica Roybal) Jessica Roybal captures images of everyday life. She often travels around New Mexico to recount these moments. It is the lowrider culture that is close to his heart. It’s also why Roybal teamed up with fellow photographer Kevin Beltran for “Rollin Forever,” which is […]]]>
“Con Confianza, Nathalia Florez” by Jessica Roybal. (Courtesy of Jessica Roybal)

Jessica Roybal captures images of everyday life.

She often travels around New Mexico to recount these moments.

It is the lowrider culture that is close to his heart.

It’s also why Roybal teamed up with fellow photographer Kevin Beltran for “Rollin Forever,” which is on display at Lapis Room in Old Town until June 27. The Lapis Room will also be hosting a Father’s Day reception from 2-5 p.m. on Sunday, June 19. .

Roybal and Beltran have complementary styles and the gallery asked them to mount their own exhibition.

Roybal grew up in Llano Quemado, a small community south of Taos. Meanwhile, Beltran grew up in Zuni Pueblo.

“We thought, ‘Why not do some new content?’ ” she says. “For the past eight years, I’ve been chasing the lowrider scene. If I’m not on a cruise, I will photograph the events. People have started to recognize who I am and they will let me get vaccinated.

Roybal has earned a lot of trust helping to tell people’s stories within the lowrider culture.

“They’re so passionate about what they’re doing with their investments,” she says. “It’s a culturally rich scene that we have. It spans several generations and becomes a family affair. This is something that we wanted to highlight in the show. It is an art form that is passed down from generation to generation.

“Across the Dash” by Kevin Beltran. (Courtesy of Kevin Beltran)

Roybal says his father had a yard full of Volkswagens and often used them for parts.

“Now that I’m older, I enjoy this work more,” she says. “That’s also what led me to chase these cars.”

For the project, Roybal and Beltran interviewed 16 families.

The series was documented and assembled over a period of three months as the couple traveled to Taos, Chimayó, Santa Fe, Bernalillo and Albuquerque. The approach to this project has evolved with the meeting of new faces and a range of vehicle collections.

“Families invited us into their homes, shared their stories, and gave this series an unprecedented inside look rather than the common perspective exterior look of a photographer,” says Roybal. “This corpus contains thousands of images. We both had to cut it down to produce the show. There are seven images per piece of the two of us.

Roybal hopes the show will be a traveling exhibit in the future.

“There’s a sense of pride in every lowrider,” she says. “These are snapshots of the bigger picture that represents the culture.”

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Sotheby’s partner Diageo auctions off ultra-rare whiskey casks https://maxkol.org/sothebys-partner-diageo-auctions-off-ultra-rare-whiskey-casks/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:04:25 +0000 https://maxkol.org/sothebys-partner-diageo-auctions-off-ultra-rare-whiskey-casks/ Diageo and Sotheby’s recently teamed up to release two of the world’s rarest Scottish single malt casks. The whiskey is sourced directly from dwindling original ‘ghost’ stocks at the iconic Brora and Port Ellen distilleries. Each cask offers the opportunity to collaborate on an order with an internationally renowned artist, creating unique pieces that reflect […]]]>

Diageo and Sotheby’s recently teamed up to release two of the world’s rarest Scottish single malt casks.

The whiskey is sourced directly from dwindling original ‘ghost’ stocks at the iconic Brora and Port Ellen distilleries.

Each cask offers the opportunity to collaborate on an order with an internationally renowned artist, creating unique pieces that reflect the distilleries and their whisky.

Diageo Casks of Distinction from Brora and Port Ellen (image via Diageo)

The auction, which runs until June 14, would be part of the Platinum Jubilee season celebrations of British craftsmanship and heritage with Sotheby’s. The casks have been handpicked as part of Diageo’s VIP program, the Casks of Distinction.

Jonny Fowle, Head of Whiskey at Sotheby’s, said: “This partnership between Sotheby’s and Diageo brings an unparalleled supply of rare whiskey casks to auction. Trying the 1982 Brora, I was amazed at its quality – the rich flavors of cooked fruit elevating its lightly peaty character. The Port Ellen is a masterclass in 1970s Islay smoke with significant cask influence, which, especially when sourced from a closed distillery, is precisely the style sought after by the world’s top whiskey collectors. .

Located at the western tip of the Isle of Islay, Port Ellen is considered a jewel in Diageo’s crown with thousands of miles of ocean and sunshine stretching out before it.

A company statement said Port Ellen whiskey is gaining more and more status over its years of closure, and this cask is one of the most valuable to exist among Port Ellen’s dwindling stocks of ghost casks. With its doors closed in 1983, the current plan is for the distillery to start making whiskey again in 2023.

The Port Ellen 1979 will be auctioned together with a unique artifact, made after the sale, in collaboration with designer and artist Ini Archibong.

Archibong will create a unique work of art capturing the light of Port Ellen and its spirit in colored glass. The unique sculpture will be a so-called physical expression of the “Dram and the Water” – representing both the precious nature of the liquid inside the cask and the distillery’s most valuable resource.

Crafted from Murano glass and finished in Islay colours, the sculptural piece will be presented to the cask owner in Port Ellen once the distillery reopens. Archibong will also develop and create a bespoke color gradient that will be used to design a set of labels for the bottles pulled from the cask.

Archibong said this artwork will represent the precious nature of the liquid inside the cask.

“Unified and juxtaposed with our most precious resource, water, they represent the heart and soul of Islay and its people. Like a precious magical gem precariously holding a finite resource that offers endless memories; this piece reminds its owner of the moment they captured Islay in a barrel and its spirit reflected on the surface of the colored glass. This artifact is a unique piece. There is only one,” he said.

Nestled in the Highlands on the northeast coast of Scotland, Brora is said to have become renowned for the quality and character of whiskey aging in its closed warehouses. Now 202 years old, the Brora Distillery was reawakened in May 2021 after a three-year restoration.

Although the distillery has reopened, there remains a finite amount of whiskey from before it closed, this being Brora’s oldest existing cask for sale.

The Brora 1982 cask will be offered alongside a print by New Zealand photographer Trey Ratcliff. Known for what is described as his mesmerizing photography capturing the beauty of distant landscapes, the master photographer will travel to Scotland for the very first time, accompanied by the cask’s new owner.

Together they will capture images that bring to life the landscape that helped shape this whisky. The photograph selected by the keg owner will become a large format edition print, in addition to being used to create a set of bespoke labels for bottles to be pulled from the keg.

Ratcliff said his photographs capture moments in time and give viewers the opportunity to reflect and transport themselves to another place in the world.

“I have dedicated my life to capturing the beauty that exists at the end of the world, where the sky meets the sea, Brora is one of those places. I wanted to travel to Scotland and take in its beautiful scenery and to do it for the first time, accompanied by someone who appreciates exceptional whiskey like this, will be an epic adventure,” he said. .

The winner of the auction of these rare casks will have the opportunity to work with Diageo experts to age their Scotch for up to five years.

The barrels are auctioned in partnership with Sotheby’s as part of their ‘Jubilee Season’ on June 14 in London. Diageo will donate 5% of the hammer price of the two barrels to Care International to support their work in Ukraine.

For more information on the sale, you can consult www.sothebys.com/PortEllenBroraCasks.

Port Ellen 1979 Cask of Distinction:

  • Distillery: Port Ellen
  • Cask number: 1145
  • Completed on: February 15, 1979
  • East. ABV: 52.9%
  • East bottles: 102
  • Estimated value: £700,000 to £1,200,000

Brora 1982 Cask of Distinction:

  • Distillery: Brora
  • Cask number: 480
  • Completed on: March 25, 1982
  • East. ABV: 52.8%
  • East. Bottles: 145
  • Estimated value: £700,000 to £1,200,000
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10 years of evolution of Temraza: Egypt’s first fashion documentary – Style – Life & Style https://maxkol.org/10-years-of-evolution-of-temraza-egypts-first-fashion-documentary-style-life-style/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:10:20 +0000 https://maxkol.org/10-years-of-evolution-of-temraza-egypts-first-fashion-documentary-style-life-style/ Caption: Egyptian fashion designer Farida Temraz (Photos courtesy of Temraz) The documentary is the first of its kind in Egypt and the Arab region. It tells the story of Egyptian fashion brand Temraza’s rise from its beginnings to international fame in a very short time. “I wanted to show the world the enormous effort of […]]]>

Caption: Egyptian fashion designer Farida Temraz (Photos courtesy of Temraz)

The documentary is the first of its kind in Egypt and the Arab region. It tells the story of Egyptian fashion brand Temraza’s rise from its beginnings to international fame in a very short time.

“I wanted to show the world the enormous effort of diligence, creativity and professionalism of the Temraza team. Temraza is supported by a highly qualified team of which I am so proud to be a part,” Farida Temraza told Ahram Online, the founder and lead designer of Temraza.

The fashion brand was established in 2012 with a mission to bring Egypt to the forefront of global fashion.

“Temraza’s style and identity appeals to all women of different ages and interests. It’s not just for super megastars and celebrities walking red carpets,” she added.

The 30-minute short film was directed and filmed by Mahmoud Hussein with photography by Mahmoud Abdel-Salam. Hussein, who has worked as a director for seven years, spoke to Ahram Online about preparing for the project.

“Preparing the film took almost a year to choose the idea, do the structure, write a good script and do a lot of research. Production and post-production took about six months,” he said. .

“I worked with photographer Abdel-Salam for nine years to photograph my fashion shows. We have a common language and we understand each other so easily,” Temraza added.

The film is narrated by 25 prominent celebrities and public figures, including singers, actors, actresses, stylists, photographers, media and television presenters, professors and leading public figures in their industries. .

“The film is designed to be an inspirational story that empowers women to gain glamor and confidence. That’s the real real hit,” Temraza says.

Narrators included diva Samira Said, Lebanese singer Carol Samaha, TV presenters Lamis El-Hadidi, Jasmine Taha Zaki and Sally Shahine.

Contributors also included other prominent names like actor Asser Yassin and his wife, Reham Abdel-Ghafour, Salma Abu Deif, Mona Abdel-Ghani, Hagar Ahmed and Naglaa Badr.

Also editor-in-chief of Enigma magazine Yasmine Shihata, celebrity stylist Marwa Abdel Samie, media expert and AUC journalism and mass communication professor Mervat Abou Oaf, and others took part in paying tribute to the designer in the film.

“I tried to create distinctive and interesting images by using optical illusions to create an effect that shows the photos as if they were taken underwater at the bottom of the sea,” Hussein added.

After the screening of the film, Temraza released her new collection called “Revolution of the I”.

The new collection includes 60 different styles, 16 of which she presented.

The models used the narrow spaces between the rows of chairs as a catwalk track. At the end of the show, all the models as well as Temraza filled the stage to applause and cheers from the audience.

“The new collection features a monogram featuring four pyramids. The three great pyramids of Egypt and the fourth pyramid of evolution signify the empowerment of women,” Temraza explained.

“I aim to continue my journey and with passion and a sense of empowerment. The previous period of my personal life has been very difficult, especially after the birth of my son Adel just four weeks ago. But I am excited to continue to create and relive the magic,” she concluded.

Short link:

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Give this AI a few words of description and it produces a stunning image – but is it art? https://maxkol.org/give-this-ai-a-few-words-of-description-and-it-produces-a-stunning-image-but-is-it-art/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 13:16:12 +0000 https://maxkol.org/give-this-ai-a-few-words-of-description-and-it-produces-a-stunning-image-but-is-it-art/ (The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.) (THE CONVERSATION) A picture might be worth a thousand words, but thanks to an artificial intelligence program called DALL-E 2, you can have a professional-looking picture with a lot less. DALL-E 2 is a new neural network algorithm that creates […]]]>

(The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.)

(THE CONVERSATION) A picture might be worth a thousand words, but thanks to an artificial intelligence program called DALL-E 2, you can have a professional-looking picture with a lot less.

DALL-E 2 is a new neural network algorithm that creates an image from a short phrase or phrase that you provide. The program, which was announced by artificial intelligence research lab OpenAI in April 2022, has not been made public. But a small and growing number of people – myself included – have had access to experimentation.


As a researcher studying the connection between technology and art, I was eager to see how well the program worked. After hours of experimentation, it’s clear that DALL-E – while not without its flaws – is a step ahead of existing imaging technology. This raises immediate questions about how these technologies will change the way art is made and consumed. It also raises questions about what it means to be creative when DALL-E 2 seems to automate much of the creative process itself.

A Staggering Range of Styles and Subjects

OpenAI researchers built DALL-E 2 from a huge collection of images with captions. They collected some of the images online and licensed others.

Using DALL-E 2 is a lot like searching the web for an image: you type a short phrase into a text box and it returns six images.

But instead of being pulled from the web, the program creates six new images, each reflecting a version of the entered phrase. (Until recently, the program produced 10 images per prompt.) For example, when friends and I gave DALL-E 2 the text prompt “cats in devo hats”, it produced 10 images of different styles.

Almost all of them could plausibly pass for professional photographs or drawings. While the algorithm didn’t quite grasp the “Devo hat” – the strange helmets worn by the New Wave Devo group – the headgear in the images it produced came close.

In recent years, a small community of artists have used neural network algorithms to produce art. Many of these works of art have distinctive qualities that almost look like real pictures, but with strange distortions of space – a kind of cyberpunk cubism. Newer text-to-image systems often produce dreamlike, fantastical images that may be delightful but rarely seem real.

DALL-E 2 offers a significant leap in image quality and realism. He can also imitate specific styles with remarkable precision. If you want images that look like real photographs, this will produce six realistic images. If you want prehistoric cave paintings of Shrek, this will generate six images of Shrek as if drawn by a prehistoric artist.

It’s amazing that an algorithm can do this. Each set of images takes less than a minute to generate. Not all images will be pleasing to the eye or necessarily reflect what you had in mind. But, even with having to sift through lots of outputs or try different text prompts, there’s no other way to get so many results so quickly, not even by hiring an artist. And, sometimes, unexpected results are the best.

In principle, anyone with enough resources and expertise can create a system like this. Google Research recently announced an impressive text-to-image conversion system, and a startup, HuggingFace, is publicly developing its own version that anyone can try right now on the web, although it’s still not as good as it is. DALL-E or Google’s system. .

It’s easy to imagine these tools transforming the way people create images and communicate, whether through memes, greeting cards, advertising – and, yes, art.

Where’s the art in that?

I had a moment in the beginning, while using DALL-E to generate different types of paintings, in all different styles – like “Odilon Redon painting from Seattle” – when I realized it was better than any paint algorithm I’ve ever developed. Then I realized that he is, in a way, a better painter than me.

In fact, no human can do what DALL-E does: create such a wide range of high-quality images in just seconds. If someone told you that a person created all these images, of course you would say that they were creative.

But that does not make DALL-E an artist. Even though it sometimes looks like magic, under the hood it is still a computer algorithm, which strictly follows the instructions of the algorithm authors at OpenAI.

If these images succeed as art, they are a product of how the algorithm was designed, the images it was trained on, and most importantly, how the artists use it.

You might be inclined to say that there is little artistic value in an image produced by a few keystrokes. But in my opinion, this line of thinking echoes the classic idea that photography can’t be art because a machine has done all the work. Today, the human authorship and craftsmanship involved in fine art photography is recognized, and critics understand that the best photography involves more than just pushing a button.

Even so, we often discuss artworks as if they came directly from the artist’s intent. The artist intended to show something, or express an emotion, and so he created this image. DALL-E seems to shorten this process entirely: you have an idea, you grab it, and you’re done.

But when I paint the old-fashioned way, I found that my paintings came from the exploratory process, not just from executing my initial goals. And this is true for many artists.

Take Paul McCartney, who coined the track “Get Back” during a jam session. He didn’t start with a plan for the song; he just started playing the violin and experimenting and the band developed it from there.

Picasso describes his process in the same way: “I don’t know in advance what I’m going to put on the canvas, nor do I decide in advance what colors I’m going to use… Each time I undertake paint a picture, I have the feeling of jumping. in the space.”

In my own explorations with DALL-E, one idea led to another which led to another, and eventually I found myself in a completely unexpected and magical new land, very far from where I had started.

Incitement as art

I would say that the art, using a system like DALL-E, comes not just from the final text prompt, but from the whole creative process leading up to that prompt. Different artists will follow different processes and achieve different results that reflect their own approaches, skills and obsessions.

I started to see my experiments as a set of series, each a cohesive dive into a single theme, rather than a set of stand-alone wacky images.

The ideas for these images and series came from everywhere, often linked by a set of stepping stones. At one point, while making images based on the work of contemporary artists, I wanted to generate a site-specific installation art image in the style of contemporary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. After trying a few unsatisfactory places, I came up with the idea of ​​placing it in La Mezquita, an old mosque and church in Cordoba, Spain. I sent the photo to a fellow architect, Manuel Ladron de Guevara, who is from Córdoba, and we started thinking about other architectural ideas together.

This became a series about imaginary new buildings in different styles of architects.

So I started to think of what I was doing with DALL-E as both a form of exploration and an art form, even though it’s often amateur art like the drawings I do on my iPad.

Indeed, some artists, like Ryan Murdoch, have argued for prompt-based image-making to be recognized as art. He cites experienced artificial intelligence artist Helena Sarin as an example.

“When I look at most stuff from Midjourney” – another popular text-to-image conversion system – “a lot of it will be interesting or funny,” Murdoch told me in an interview. “But with [Sarin’s] work, there is a direct line. It’s easy to see that she put a lot of thought into it and worked on the craft, as the result is more visually appealing and interesting, and follows her style continuously.

Working with DALL-E, or one of the newer text-to-image systems, means learning its quirks and developing strategies to avoid common pitfalls. It’s also important to be aware of its potential harms, such as its reliance on stereotyping and potential uses for misinformation. By using DALL-E 2 you will also discover surprising correlations, like how everything becomes old when you use the style of an old painter, filmmaker or photographer.

When I want to do something very specific, DALL-E often can’t do it. The results would require a lot of difficult manual editing afterwards. It’s when my goals are vague that the process is most enjoyable, providing surprises that lead to new ideas which in turn lead to more ideas and so on.

Shaping new realities

These text-to-image conversion systems can also help users imagine new possibilities.

Artist-activist Danielle Baskin told me that she is always working “to show alternate realities through ‘real’ examples: either setting up scenarios in the physical world or doing detailed work in Photoshop.” . DALL-E, however, “is an incredible shorthand because it’s so good at realism. And it’s key to helping others bring possible futures to life, whether it’s satire, dreams, or beauty. .

She used it to imagine an alternative transportation system and plumbing that carries noodles instead of water, both of which reflect her provocative artistic sensibility.

Similarly, artist Mario Klingemann’s architectural renderings of the tents of the homeless could be seen as a cue to my architectural renderings of whimsical dream houses.

It is too early to judge the importance of this art form. I keep thinking of a line from the excellent book “Art in the After-Culture” – “The dominant aesthetic of AI is novelty”.

This would surely be true, to some extent, for any new technology used for art. The Lumière brothers’ early films in the 1890s were novelties, not cinematic masterpieces; it amazed people to see images moving at all.

AI art software is developing so rapidly that there is continuous technical and artistic novelty. It’s as if, every year, there’s an opportunity to explore an exciting new technology – each one more powerful than the last, and each one seemingly poised to transform art and society.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/give-this-ai-a-few-words-of-description-and-it-produces-a-stunning-image-but-is-it-art-184363.

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Anthony Vaccarello, creative director of Saint Laurent, uses unorthodox photographers for new pop-up exhibitions around the world https://maxkol.org/anthony-vaccarello-creative-director-of-saint-laurent-uses-unorthodox-photographers-for-new-pop-up-exhibitions-around-the-world/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 19:06:31 +0000 https://maxkol.org/anthony-vaccarello-creative-director-of-saint-laurent-uses-unorthodox-photographers-for-new-pop-up-exhibitions-around-the-world/ Launched in 2018, Self is Saint Laurentof the collaborative artistic initiative organized by its creative director, Anthony Vaccarello. For the seventh iteration of the series, which makes its world debut this week, Vaccarello tapped six different photographers, none of whom work in mainstream fashion, and asked them to place his summer 2022 collection in the […]]]>

Launched in 2018, Self is Saint Laurentof the collaborative artistic initiative organized by its creative director, Anthony Vaccarello. For the seventh iteration of the series, which makes its world debut this week, Vaccarello tapped six different photographers, none of whom work in mainstream fashion, and asked them to place his summer 2022 collection in the context of their individual artistic vision.

It takes both confidence and a high-caliber collaborator for a creative director to successfully let go of the reins, and Vaccarello’s top-notch talent pool certainly delivered. Assembled image makers include Alex WebbHarry Gruyaert and Olivia Arthur, all members of the famous Magnum Photos collective, as well as Takashi Homma, Daesung Lee and the duo Birdhead, all of whom generally work in the field of fine art.

From June 9-12, each artist will have their own temporary outdoor exhibition in one of six cities – New York, Paris, London, Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai, respectively – where they will show a mix of their new commissions with a selection of their vintage work. (A very limited quantity of each edition will be available for pre-order for purchase, on-site only.) The result is decidedly not an advertising campaign, but it definitely blurs the lines between fine art and fashion. Time, context and setting are further obscured by displaying new and old images side by side in a city that has nothing to do with the photos. These overlapping juxtapositions, designed to provide pause, are what make this such a complex and touching hybrid. On a much simpler level, pop-ups will provide an evocative backdrop to discerning passers-by.

Since its creation, Self was an ambitious project, mainly focused on film and photography. Previous collaborators include Vanessa Beecroft, Bret Easton Ellis and Gaspar Noé. A Self 07 standout is Magnum photographer Alex Webb.

Known for his singular sense of color and graphic style, Webb captures frozen moments that are both grand and intimate. Seventeen new images will be on display alongside some of his earlier work in New York’s Madison Square Park. Before the opening of the exhibition on June 9, we spoke with him about his approach to the project.

Say it with balloons: Alex Webb’s vision of LA, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

How did this project start?

I was in Los Angeles a few months ago and was very intrigued by the neighborhoods on the southern outskirts of downtown. The flower district and the piñata district seemed particularly intriguing. In many ways they reminded me of parts of Mexico; they look quite Hispanic, with bright colors. Much of my photographic life has taken place in the Caribbean and Latin America, particularly Mexico. So I thought it would be an interesting place to do it. I also thought of Venice Beach, but found that area to be more evocative and intriguing. Venice has been extensively photographed.

I’ve never heard of the piñata district!

Most people don’t know this, but it’s quite surprising that you come down to this area and it’s all Mexican decorations.

Basically what I decided to do is create a kind of visual conversation between some of my Latin American and Caribbean photography and these new Saint Laurent images. These photos are certainly stylish – they’re wearing Saint Laurent clothes – but I tried to channel some of the spirit of what I did for many years in Latin America, sort of dealing with similar moments, similar lights.

How did you go about casting the models?

I worked with a stylist, Avena Gallagher, and we looked at a bunch of casting sheets and so on, and between us we kind of decided which people we thought were interesting.

I’ve worked with her before about four years ago, and I actually asked her for this particular shoot when I was asked to do it. We are getting along very well.

Are you a fan of fashion photography?

I am not actively into fashion photography. When I was asked to do a fashion shoot, it’s because they want something that resembles what I do on the street, they want the vibe of the street. They want the same sense of moment and the same sense of light that I tend to work in.

Alex Webb's unique perspective on LA.  Courtesy of Saint-Laurent.

A view of LA by Alex Webb, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

There’s a real textural play in the environment, for example, the glowing glow of a car against rough brickwork.

I am truly an environmental photographer. I am intrigued by how people exist in their environment. I went out and looked for places that seemed evocative where I could take the models and try to do something. Often it had to do with a sense of color. Sometimes there is a shiny yellow wall. Other times there’s a place where you see people in deep space, it’s quite interesting. But you know, basically, it was very important for me to find places to put these models.

I think there is also an element of mystery in these images. There is a story, but the viewer does not know what it is and it is up to them to decide. Did you have a story in mind?

No, it’s really more the feel of each individual situation. I tried to channel the spirit of my street work, which often has a somewhat enigmatic note.

Cotton candy, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1990 by Alex Webb.  Courtesy of Magnum.

Alex Webb, Cotton candy, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1990. Courtesy of Magnum Photos.

What was it like working with other people? Fashion is a multi-cog machine. Your job looks like you are on a single player mission.

In countries where I don’t speak the language, maybe I work with a fixer or something, but most of the time I work alone. I wander and let the rhythms of the streets and my experiences lead me where I will go. So clearly, doing a fashion shoot is a totally different kind of thing.

But in the context of the fashion shoot, I try to put things in place so that there is a possibility of surprise. Not everything is scripted. I will make models come and go, but I don’t direct them. I will wait for what will appear as a moment in the street. It is not a rigid situation.

Webb stumbled upon this butterfly decoration while on a reconnaissance.  Courtesy of Saint-Laurent.

Webb stumbled upon this butterfly decoration while scouting and incorporated it into this photo, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

It really shows. It’s very un-lay-y. Fashion seems to be an organic component of a slice of life.

I think that’s what they wanted from me and what they were looking for. It’s quite fluid. There’s a fair amount of serendipity to the process, even in the context of a fashion shoot.

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