Photography genres – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:57:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Photography genres – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 8th Indian Photo Festival 2022 in Hyderabad Dates https://maxkol.org/8th-indian-photo-festival-2022-in-hyderabad-dates/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 04:23:43 +0000 https://maxkol.org/8th-indian-photo-festival-2022-in-hyderabad-dates/ The Indian Photo Festival (IPF) 2022, South Asia’s leading photography festival, is back with its eighth edition and opened its doors to the public with a gala opening ceremony. Held in Hyderabad from November 18th to December 19th for a month, the IPF once again brought in some of the world renowned names in the […]]]>

The Indian Photo Festival (IPF) 2022, South Asia’s leading photography festival, is back with its eighth edition and opened its doors to the public with a gala opening ceremony. Held in Hyderabad from November 18th to December 19th for a month, the IPF once again brought in some of the world renowned names in the photography industry.

Sri. Srinivas Goud (Minister of Prohibition and Excise of Telangana Overview), Shri Sandeep Kumar Sultania, IAS (Government Secretary for Youth Promotion, Department of Tourism and Culture, Government of Telangana) opened the festival by lighting the lamp in the morning. This was followed by a grand opening ceremony of the festival in the evening attended by guest of honor Dr. Lakshmi, IAS, (Director of the State Art Gallery), Mr. Aquin Mathews, Festival Director and founder of the Lightcraft Foundation, speakers Gulnara Samoilova ( Photographer and founder of Women Street Photographers, Smita Sharma Photojournalist and author, Julia Coddington Photographer and co-founder of Unxposed Collective, Selvaprakash Lakshmanan Freelance photographer, Tarun Bhartiya Photographer and filmmaker, Sabeena Gadihoke Academic, Curator and Filmmaker, Dominique Hildebrand National Geographic Photo Editor and Street Photographer Vineet Vohra.

The IPF is India’s oldest international photo festival and the 8th edition will be on display at the State Gallery of Art, Madhapur, Alliance Francaise, Salar Jung Museum and along the KBR Park Outdoor Walking Path. The festival will host a series of programs such as artist talks, print and digital photography exhibitions, screenings, workshops and portfolio reviews. Photographers from several countries including India, Canada, USA, Poland, Brazil, Switzerland, Australia, Japan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Iran, Romania, Germany , Ukraine and France take part in the photo festival.

Photography is the best visual medium to raise awareness and create awareness on various current social issues around the world. There is a considerable amount of storytelling each year at the festival that explores social issues. This year’s exhibition includes the work of Indian photographer Smita Sharma exploring the growing threat of human trafficking, the work of French photographer Ana Bloom on the refugee crisis, the work of Italian photographer Diego Fedele on the absurdity of war, Australian photographer Matthew Dunne’s work on biodiversity loss, Indian photographer Nishat Fatima’s work on the LGBTQia community, Iranian photographer Shaghayegh Moradiannejad’s work on self-immolation among Kurdish women, etc. .

The IPF creates an ecosystem for the photographic community through exhibition opportunities, photography grants, free mentorship programs, access to Indian and worldwide mentors. IPF is a great networking platform for photographers in India where they can meet publishers, collectors, curators, gallery owners from all over the world. The festival has facilitated photography grants directly and through its partners amounting to INR 10 million so far.

IPF – Hyderabad is a non-profit initiative of the Light Craft Foundation. It is organized in partnership with Telangana Tourism, Govt. of Telangana and State Art Gallery. The festival celebrates a range of Indian and international photography in all genres and exposes the festival to over 500,000 people every year across all venues.

The event is free and open to the public.

Festival Highlights 2022

Book launch, exhibition and discussion by acclaimed and award-winning photojournalist Smita Sharma. Smita’s book ‘We Cry in Silence’ will be launched at the festival followed by a conversation between Sarah Leen (cinematographer) and Smita (photojournalist) on 18 November Friday 5.30pm at the State Art Gallery, Hyderabad.
This is Smita’s first photobook documenting the cross-border trafficking of underage girls in South Asia.

Another highlight of this festival is a group photography exhibition of 50 women street photographers from around the world which will be on display at KBR Park from November 18 to December 19, 2022. This work is curated by Women Street Photography founder Gulnara Samilova. This collective exhibition presents the work of 50 photographers from 20 countries, including Roshani Shah, Sandra Cattaneo Adorno, Mina Noel, Dominique Misrahi, Regula Tschumi and Ximena Echague among many others.

In association with National Geographic, again this year, IPF is offering FREE portfolio reviews for Indian photographers. Critics are among National Geographic magazine’s most sought-after photo editors: Dominique Hildebrand (photo editor), Smita Sharma (photojournalist), Srinivas Kuruganti (photographer and editor), Sabeena Gadihoke (academic, curator and filmmaker), and Julia Coddington ( photographer and co-founder Unexposed Collective). IPF has been supported by National Geographic since 2019 in its efforts to promote photography in India.

Award-winning Indian photographer, Srinivas Kuruganti will host a two-day Masterclass on Visual Storytelling. And a three-day fashion and portrait masterclass by Manoj Jadhav.

Street photography workshop with Vineet Vohra and Gulnara Samoilova

A free editing workshop with National Geographic photo editor Dominique Hildebrand for emerging and professional photographers working on a long-term story or considering developing their own story.

Also this year, the IPF has lined up some of the world’s most famous and iconic photographers. The list of speakers: Dominique Hildebrand, Sarah Leen (virtual), Smita Sharma, David Y. Lee (virtual), Sabeena Gadihoke, Gulnara Samoilova, Selvaprakash, Tarun Bhartiya, Shweta Upadhyay, Hari Katragadda, Julia Coddington and Sana Ullah (virtual) .

IPF – Hyderabad is a non-profit initiative of the Light Craft Foundation. It is organized in partnership with Telangana Tourism, Govt. of Telangana and State Art Gallery. The festival celebrates a range of Indian and international photography in all genres and exposes the festival to over 500,000 people every year across all venues.

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Don’t throw in Prospect Park!! Premiere on Sunday, November 20 https://maxkol.org/dont-throw-in-prospect-park-premiere-on-sunday-november-20/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/dont-throw-in-prospect-park-premiere-on-sunday-november-20/ An absurd horror short film with rockabilly accents A new B-horror short with rockabilly accents, Don’t Litter in Prospect Park!! uses satire to convey a message that we all agree on. Being creative and thinking outside the box is the best way to get your point across, otherwise people will move on and forget. – […]]]>

An absurd horror short film with rockabilly accents

A new B-horror short with rockabilly accents, Don’t Litter in Prospect Park!! uses satire to convey a message that we all agree on.

Being creative and thinking outside the box is the best way to get your point across, otherwise people will move on and forget.

– Christopher Wells

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, USA, November 18, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — A B-horror short film with rockabilly accents, Don’t Litter in Prospect Park!! premieres at the New York City Short Comedy Film Festival at 4 p.m. on Sunday, November 20.

Christopher was motivated to produce a satirical film after his beloved park was completely vandalized…. assholes! It was the worst the park had ever seen, every trash can was knocked over, litter was thrown everywhere including the dog pond. It was horrible and he wanted bloody revenge!

After participating in the cleanup, he was still pissed off, so he wrote a script in which the characters who play the bedbugs are idiots. Yes, those big-haired John Travolta greasers are wonderfully dumb and are being stalked by a deranged lunatic wearing a mask made from a recycled plastic milk jug. His heavy breathing fury results in exaggerated carnage.

“That’s so stupid, that’s awesome,” one person said when being tested.

Christopher is no stranger to producing films that have an underlying message. His website kpictures.com showcases a wide variety of his work including films of all genres. When he’s not making films for entertainment, he produces marketing videos and commercial photography for his clients, whether large or small businesses. “Being creative and thinking outside the box is the best way to get your point across, otherwise people will move on and forget.”

Logline: A trio of greasers attempt a sadistic takeover of Prospect Park to make it meaner. Little do they know it, an obsessive anti-trash madman is hiding in the woods and going after them.

Tagline: You throw, you die!

If you hate trash but love sweet revenge with a healthy dose of retro, you’ll go crazy watching Don’t Litter in Prospect Park!

*A private screener is available for the press to review.
Duration: 13 minutes 46 seconds

BTS, screenshots and poster here

Link to webpage with trailer

Christopher Wells grew up on Long Island, attended the School of Visual Arts as a film major, and lived in Brooklyn for over 15 years, often strolling through Prospect Park. He is the owner of Kpictures, a full-service video and photography production company specializing in unique store storytelling.

Sincerely

Christopher Wells

##

Christopher Wells
Independent filmmaker
516.270.5176 (cellular)
cwells@kpictures.com
@WellsChristopher
Kpictures.com

Christopher Wells
Kphotos
+1 516-270-5176
write to us here

Don’t throw in Prospect Park!! (Trailer)

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Art Around Town – Flagpole https://maxkol.org/art-around-town-flagpole/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:06:34 +0000 https://maxkol.org/art-around-town-flagpole/ ACE/FRANCISCO & OX FINE ART GALLERY (675 Pulaski St.) Franni Thrasher, aka “Heaven4theYoung,” presents a solo exhibition of oil and watercolor paintings, sculpture and film. To see by appointment until December 9th. ARTWALL@HOTEL INDIGO ATHENS (500 College Ave.) New York photographers Lucy Reback and Megan Reilly share a collection of intimate vignettes from their relationship […]]]>

ACE/FRANCISCO & OX FINE ART GALLERY (675 Pulaski St.) Franni Thrasher, aka “Heaven4theYoung,” presents a solo exhibition of oil and watercolor paintings, sculpture and film. To see by appointment until December 9th.

ARTWALL@HOTEL INDIGO ATHENS (500 College Ave.) New York photographers Lucy Reback and Megan Reilly share a collection of intimate vignettes from their relationship in addition to snapshots before they met.

THE ATHENEE (287 W. Broad St.) Brooklyn-based artist and educator Kameelah Janan Rasheed presents “SMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTH OPERATOR,” an exhibit examining the poetics and power of machine learning. Until December 1.

ATHENS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART: ATHICA (675 Pulaski St.) Juried by Liz Andrews of the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, “MOOD: 2022 Juried Exhibition” features works by 37 contemporary artists who explore or reference mood in all of its many forms. Until November 20.

ATHICA@CINE GALLERY (234 W. Hancock Ave.) Christy Bush’s photography exhibit, “Familiar,” looks back on 30 years of rock and roll, fashion and coming of age in the South. Until December 25.

CIRCLE GALLERY AT UGA COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (Jackson Street Building) Cameron Berglund’s exhibition “Design (Sketch) Process” focuses on the role of manual and digital sketching throughout the design process. Until December 6.

CLASSIC CENTER (300 N. Thomas St.) “Spotlight: Paintings by Amy Watts” features bold, colorful canvases full of cowgirls, farmers, miners, and Native people. • ‘Light Bright’ features artwork by Caitlin Gal, Allison McPheeters and Alivia Patton, all of whom use simple circles to create inspiring artwork.

DODD GALLERIES (270 River Rd.) “Twin Realms” combines the work of Dodd MFA candidates Katie Ford and Lindsey Kennedy. Until November 17. • Curated by Ciel Rodriguez, “Soft Architecture” is a group exhibition of works by Ashley Freeby, Jacob Goble and Hope Wang as part of an investigation into the relationship between architectural spaces and grief. Until November 17. • ‘Pretty in Pink’ features works by Catie Cook and Sarah Landmesser, and explores the contradictions inherent in femininity and feminism. Until November 17. • On display in the CUBE gallery, “Design for a Museum: Tangible & Functional Objects III” is a student exhibition in graphic design. Mondays and Wednesdays until November 30.

E-VORTEX CREATIONS (560 Caldwell Circle) Jen Graff, Yoon Hwang and other local ceramicists sell sculptural and functional pottery. Every Wednesday and Sunday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

THE DONDEROS KITCHEN (590 N. Milledge Ave.) Susan Pelham’s collages are inspired by magic realism, surrealism, nursery rhymes and folk tales. Until December.

FLICKER THEATER AND BAR (263 W. Washington St.) Artwork by Mark Dalling. Until November.

GEORGIA ART MUSEUM (90 Carlton St.) “Infinity on the Horizon” highlights modern and contemporary works that expand common understanding of landscapes. Until December 31. • “Reckonings and Reconstructions: Southern Photography from The Do Good Fund”. Until January 8. • “Allison Janae Hamilton: between life and landscape”. Until February 5. • “Kristin Leachman: Longleaf Lines” focuses on close-up views of the patterns and biology of longleaf pine and its ecosystem. Until February 5. • Exhibited in the Jane and Harry Willson Sculpture Garden, “Jane Manus: Undaunted” includes five large abstract works. Until February 12. • “In dialogue: Henry Ossawa Tanner, mentor and muse”. Until June 18. • “Decade of Tradition: Highlights from the Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Collection”. Until July 3.

GLASSCUBE@INDIGO (500 College Ave.) Zane Cochran presents “Aurora,” a sculptural interpretation of the Northern Lights using 3D geometric figures and lights.

HERITAGE COFFEE (815 N. Chase St.) Local artist Jack Burk shares a collection of nature-inspired works in pastel, collage, pen and colored pencil. Reception on November 22, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Currently visible until December 13.

HENDERSHOTS (237 Prince Ave.) The Nirvinyl Album Art Museum presents “Nirvinyl 1 Revisited & Halloween Selections”. Until mid-November.

LYNDON HOUSE ARTS CENTER (211 Hoyt St.) Cedric Smith presents a series of portraits for “Window Works,” a site-specific series that uses the building’s main entrance windows for outdoor viewing of artwork. Reconfiguring the card games of kings and queens, his portraits question the absence of black figures in the graphic history of the country. Until December 21. • “The Ties That Bind: The Paradox of Cultural Survival in the Face of Climate Events” features sculptures by Anina Major and photographs by Tamika Galanis. Until November 30. • The biennial Clarke County School District “RE-” Student Art Exhibition features work by K-12 students in all media. Until January 14. • “Resilient Civic and Musical Life: Stories of Slaves and Ware-Lyndon House Descendants” includes a film; reading room for books relevant to the African American experience in art, music and heritage; and a visual timeline telling a fuller and more truthful story of the property and its people. To be seen from Thursday to Saturday. • Bess Carter, recipient of the 2022 Art Center Choice Award from the 47th Juried Exhibition, presents a solo exhibition of landscapes, bedroom interiors and still lifes. Artist conference on February 16. Currently visible until March 4. • “A Pattern of Moments” features works by Kate Burke, Rebecca Kreisler and Sylvia Schaefer. November 17 workshop at 6 p.m. Currently visible until March 4. • In preparation for “The Same, Yet Separate Artworks,” blacksmith and interdisciplinary artist J Taran Diamond visited the historic Ware-Lyndon House Museum and created new objects in response. . Third Thursday Gallery Talk January 19, 6 p.m. Currently on view through March 4.

MADISON-MORGAN CULTURAL CENTER (434 S. Main St., Madison) Joni Mabe, creator of Everything Elvis in Cornelia, GA, presents “Calvacade of Stars,” a group of sparkling mosaics featuring Elvis Presley, Otis Redding, Ty Cobb, Steve McQueen, PT Barnum and other entertainment luminaries. Until January 28.

JSP ART PHOTOGRAPHY Austin Eddy presents “Passers-by” to Tif Sigfrids until November 22. A book release and closing reception will be held on November 19 from 4 to 6 p.m.

MASON-SCHARFENSTEIN ART MUSEUM (567 Georgia St., Demorest) “I’m Not a Habersham Firecracker” features multimedia paintings and assemblage sculptures by Joni Mabe, owner of the Everything Elvis Museum in Cornelia, GA. Until November 29.

ODUM SCHOOL OF ECOLOGY GALLERY (140 E. Green St.) Natural science illustrator C Olivia Carlisle shares illustrations of insects, botany, and ecosystems using graphite, carbon pencil, watercolor, acrylic, ink, colored pencils and Adobe Photoshop. Until May.

GEORGIA STATE BOTANICAL GARDEN (2450 S. Milledge Ave) Vicky Tavernier and Jenifer Borg’s collaborative exhibition, “Words About Birds, Insights About Insects,” is comprised of playful collages of found and altered objects accompanied by poems. Until November 20.

TIF SIGFRIDS (393 N. Finley St.) Brooklyn-based artist Austin Eddy presents “Passers-by,” a collection of new paintings and works on paper. Book launch and closing reception November 19, 4-6 p.m. Currently on view until November 22.

SMALL ATH GALLERY (174 Cleveland Ave.) Dedicated to the late Art Rosenbaum, Peter Loose’s solo exhibition “Places of Peace” revolves around paintings of birds he created the night he learned of Rosenbaum’s death, as well than other new paints. Open third Thursday, November 17, 6-9 p.m. Open by appointment weekdays after 5 p.m. through November by emailing tinyathgallery@gmail.com.

UGA SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARIES (300 S. Hull St.) “Georgia on my Mind: Finding Belonging in Music History” explores the genres, spaces and performers that have helped define music in the state over time. Until December 9. • “Unequal by Design: Housing in Georgia and America” ​​draws on historical government records, photographs, historical journals, and other materials to trace the evolution of housing policy, tackling issues such as zoning, gentrification and suburbanization. Until May 26. • “A Chance to Play: Title IX and Women’s Athletics at UGA” celebrates 50 years of women’s sports at UGA.

NORTH GEORGIA UNIVERSITY OCONEE CAMPUS (1201 Bishop Farms Pkwy., Watkinsville) Lisa Freeman’s exhibition of mixed media assemblages and works on paper, “Dark Cotton Revisited”, shines a light on the lives affected by a racially prejudiced world. Until December 9.

LONG LIVE ARGENTINA (247 Prince Ave.) A retrospective exhibition of paintings by the late Chatham Murray to celebrate what would have been his 80th birthday. Until November.

WINTERVILLE LIBRARY (115 Marigold Lane, Winterville) Oil paintings by Dortha Jacobson. Until November.

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Friday, November 11, 2022 – La Minute Monocle https://maxkol.org/friday-november-11-2022-la-minute-monocle/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 06:03:31 +0000 https://maxkol.org/friday-november-11-2022-la-minute-monocle/ Opinion / Amy Van Denberg Under the influence? Welcome to the Canadian club. This week, a report by broadcaster Global News claimed that the North American nation could, like the United States, be subject to foreign political interference. China allegedly interfered in the 2019 general election – in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won his […]]]>

Opinion / Amy Van Denberg

Under the influence?

Welcome to the Canadian club. This week, a report by broadcaster Global News claimed that the North American nation could, like the United States, be subject to foreign political interference. China allegedly interfered in the 2019 general election – in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau won his second term – by placing operatives in the offices of sitting MPs and funding a secret network of candidates . Beijing denies the information.

If the claims turn out to be true, it would hardly be surprising. China has become an increasingly aggressive global power, and exerting its influence on the Canadian democratic process covertly would allow it to target the United States by proxy. It is also concerning that, according to the report, Trudeau and several members of his party were informed of the interference in January by Canadian intelligence officials.

The Prime Minister may have decided to prioritize the long-awaited Indo-Pacific Strategy, which will be unveiled next month, but many MPs want more. “Trudeau has failed to protect our democracy,” Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre said on Wednesday, calling for an investigation by a parliamentary committee. Others are calling for the creation of a register of foreign agents similar to those in Australia and the United States – something that has been on the table for years.

That’s the last thing Trudeau needs. His party has already been investigating for four weeks his use of extreme powers to disband the February Freedom Convoy protests in Ottawa. Besides the serious implications of the allegations for Canadian security and sovereignty, the alleged interference by China makes the position of the Prime Minister’s Liberal Party even more fragile than it already is. Trust in Trudeau is waning and one more embarrassment could push him over the edge.

Amy van den Berg is associate editor for Monocle’s books division.

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Think Piece: Why Immersive Art Feels Bad | Arts https://maxkol.org/think-piece-why-immersive-art-feels-bad-arts/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/think-piece-why-immersive-art-feels-bad-arts/ As children, many wish they could step into a painting like Mary Poppins in the world of street chalk, or follow the scribbles of Harold’s Purple Crayon. Since there is no portal to these worlds yet, the next best thing has begun: immersive art exhibits. Upon entering these exhibitions – probably housed in a former […]]]>

As children, many wish they could step into a painting like Mary Poppins in the world of street chalk, or follow the scribbles of Harold’s Purple Crayon. Since there is no portal to these worlds yet, the next best thing has begun: immersive art exhibits.

Upon entering these exhibitions – probably housed in a former warehouse – the ceiling lights go out and the surrounding walls are illuminated with famous works of art like Vincent van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” or the Sixtine Chapel. Why not transform van Gogh, Monet and Kahlo into a sort of Walt Disney world with interactive play areas made from their art? Maybe even with a Zuckerbergian Metaverse spin? These multi-sensory immersive experiences based on a given artist’s original work are larger than life.

Immersive van Gogh’s premier, in particular, has been spreading like wildfire, much like any “cool find” on TikTok. In 2020, Netflix released an episode of the hit show “Emily in Paris,” featuring a bright-eyed Emily wandering through the original Immersive van Gogh Paris exhibit. It was a perfect idea for the (somewhat) post-pandemic and impatient lifestyle: exciting, fast-paced and with lots and lots of screens.

After Immersive van Gogh made its successful debut in Paris, the medium turned to exhibiting in American metropolises. The grandeur and perpetual stimulation seem appropriately American, especially to American children (a generation of “iPad kids”) or adults who find the art world inaccessible due to its ties to American wealth and education. ‘elite. Immersive art exhibitions succeed in bringing the infamous and the inaccessible closer to the public who should board a plane to experience art. But this point is cautioned, however, by the exclusive location of exhibitions in major cities.

A major appeal of these shows becomes clear after watching “Emily in Paris” or scrolling through social media. These immersive shows are aesthetically stunning. On Instagram, they convey the image of a person who is not only fun and artistic, but also cultured. Undeniably, a big part of Immersive van Gogh’s success has been the appeal to teens and young adults who love a colorful and flashy post on their feed.

This trend of immersive art is not limited to contemporary generations either. A Shakespeare play at the Globe Theater or a choir singing in a medieval Gothic church have historically had a similar, if analogous, immersive effect to these exhibits. After recent examples include the works of contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama or those presented at the Venice Biennale that force viewers to walk through a physical space to experience their art on a multidimensional level.

Of course, seeing an original Kusama installation is totally different from seeing a Frida Kahlo recreation, but when you attend Immersive Frida Kahlo, it’s the original work of Massimiliano Siccardi, who was also the artist behind Immersive van Gogh , Klimt and Monet & The Impressionists. Siccardi is well established in the art world, having studied dance and winning awards for his photography and stage design over the past thirty years. As the mastermind behind these installations, Siccardi asserted himself in a monopoly of the awe-inspiring world of digital art, his reach spanning continents and genres.

These artists at the heart of immersive exhibitions, many of whom are long dead, could never have imagined this twist of the digital age on their works. What they did with oil paints, brush and canvas can now be revitalized by Siccardi and other digital artists. To use this art, they certainly had to jump through hoops with copyright laws, but artists like Warhol did too. In 1984, Warhol altered Lynn Goldsmith’s portrayal of Prince for a Vanity Fair piece, after which a series of debates over his right to do so ensued. Warhol argued that his interpretation changed the meaning of the picture, giving it new life, as the lively renditions of these Impressionists claim. Siccardi and Warhol may recycle other people’s art to an extreme extent, but most artists create with consideration for their time and the art that preceded them.

Impressionism grew out of Romanticism, which was inspired by works from Ancient Greece. A totally new and contemporary genre that is in fact within a canon of Western art. Artists in immersive exhibits are now harnessing what they learned from art before them with digital tools, perhaps in much the same way the Romans copied exact Greek sculptures using more modern tools. Do these Roman sculptures have to face the same challenge as the immersive exhibitions?

Perhaps then, the crux of the matter lies not just in satisfying a social media-centric generation, but in the fact that by using this famous art, digital artists are stripping the original art of his “aura”. In one of his most influential essays, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” 20th-century aesthetic and social philosopher Walter Benjamin defines the aura as “that which fades in the ‘age of mechanical reproduction’. Ancient Roman art, copied or original, therefore has an aura that the “mechanical reproductions” of Siccardi’s Impressionist works do not have. The original art he shows does not retain his “aura”, while for Kusama to walk on his mirrored floors is to experience his art in its most fruitful, not withered form.

Going to Immersive van Gogh, you’re not going to see a collection of van Gogh’s greatest works, you’re going to see a digital interpretation of van Gogh, which may or may not matter to audiences who prefer to spend $40 to see van Gogh Gogh animated in a $25 Tribeca warehouse to see the real thing at the MET.

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Monterey Bay photographers take center stage at a photo conference. | Monterey County NOW Intro https://maxkol.org/monterey-bay-photographers-take-center-stage-at-a-photo-conference-monterey-county-now-intro/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/monterey-bay-photographers-take-center-stage-at-a-photo-conference-monterey-county-now-intro/ Agata Popęda here, with something to consider this weekend. We realize at Weekly that fall 2022 seems more eventful than alreadybut one world class photo conference open to the public and free still sounds like an absolute bargain. This year, the two-day B&H OPTIC conference traveled from New York to Monterey to OPTIC West Edition. […]]]>

Agata Popęda here, with something to consider this weekend. We realize at Weekly that fall 2022 seems more eventful than alreadybut one world class photo conference open to the public and free still sounds like an absolute bargain. This year, the two-day B&H OPTIC conference traveled from New York to Monterey to OPTIC West Edition. The event starts on Sunday and continues through Monday; even though it’s free, registration is mandatory.

Highlights include two local presentations: One of Kim and Zach Weston, from one of the most recognized families in modern photography, and one by world renowned photographer Frans Lanting. The Westons and Lanting will all share how their work has been shaped by the Monterey County region. They could assist you (at no cost) in your own efforts to capture the beauty of “one of the world’s premier photo destinations: Monterey, California”, with your smartphone, and teach you about the region’s glorious natural and photographic history. .

Zach Weston is a fourth generation member of the artist family which includes his great-grandfather Edward Weston, great-uncle Brett Weston, grandfather Cole Weston and father, Kim Weston. The latter will join him in a presentation called “Generations of Westons – Beyond Legacy” at 4 p.m. on Sunday, November 6.

“It’s always fun working with my dad” Zach Weston says, “It doesn’t matter if it’s doing this presentation or in the darkroom. I am honored to be part of this conference. It’s a big deal and a lot of fun.

The Westons will share the secrets of craftsmanship documented by four generations of photographers, reviewing how each of them developed their unique style and ending with the mission of the Weston Collective, a non-profit family organization that encourages photography in the community through workshops and more. Kim Weston will also talk about her upcoming book.

OPTIC West is particularly aimed at lovers of animal, travel and landscape genres. To that end, keynote speaker Frans Lanting, photographer, author and National Geographic lecturer, will open the conference at 10 a.m. on Sunday, November 6. presenting his latest book and project: Bay of life, of the wind to the whales, which he co-created with his wife Chris Eckstrom.

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“This project, bay of lifeis a tribute to all the wonderful people who have lived and worked here,says Lanting. “And we have this unique history in Monterey Bay of artists and activists working together for the greater good. Ansel Adams was an activist in his day.

The book and project explore the wonders of one of Earth’s natural crown jewels: Monterey Bay, a biodiversity hotspot in North America. “We are now collaborating with other activists, scientists and community organizations, who are taking action to heal Monterey Bay, as trouble looms on the horizon,” Lanting said. “There is climate change, there is population growth, there are fires. It’s going to take a concerted effort for all of us to work to preserve the quality of life here. »

It’s a vision that goes far beyond capturing images in photos. B&H is a photo and video equipment retailer founded in 1973 in New York. B&H OPTIC started in 2015 as a symposium for great photographers, the tools they use, and the people who create those tools. The conference typically includes presentations by guest speakers, portfolio reviews, and attracts equipment manufacturers. OPTIC West will feature two days of presentations, a trade show, photo reviews and contests, and a mini whale watching photo expedition. (For those unable to join the Monterey Conference Center, live streaming options will be available.)

Nature photography can be action photography or a study of patience. Both skills are needed to deal with living environments, and switching gears is inevitable. This talk invites you to learn the techniques that make this change possible, and all the technical tricks that make local photographers excel at both.

Read the full newsletter here.

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UHD Review – Army of Darkness (Scream Factory Steelbook) https://maxkol.org/uhd-review-army-of-darkness-scream-factory-steelbook/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 20:28:24 +0000 https://maxkol.org/uhd-review-army-of-darkness-scream-factory-steelbook/ Director – Sam Raimi (The Evil Dead, Drag Me to Hell)Starring – Bruce Campbell (Bubba Ho-Tep, Evil Dead II), Embeth Davidtz (Matilda, Thir13en Ghosts), Marcus Gilbert (Doctor Who, Rambo III)Release date – 1992Rating – 4/5UHD version – 4.5/5 Most of my close friends have heard these stories, but my childhood was an unusual time for […]]]>

Director – Sam Raimi (The Evil Dead, Drag Me to Hell)
Starring – Bruce Campbell (Bubba Ho-Tep, Evil Dead II), Embeth Davidtz (Matilda, Thir13en Ghosts), Marcus Gilbert (Doctor Who, Rambo III)
Release date – 1992
Rating – 4/5
UHD version – 4.5/5

Most of my close friends have heard these stories, but my childhood was an unusual time for me. The woman who gave birth to me has serious mental issues and used religion to deal with them. However, her mental issues made her fanatical about religion and when I was only a few months old, she abandoned me. My father was able to find me safe and sound. Fast forward a few years and she was back in our lives for a short time. I was maybe 4 or 5 at the time and she made me sit down and watch several movies over and over because she believed they contained hidden messages from God or bullshit. Honestly, I liked a few of the movies she made me watch, so I didn’t mind.

One of the films was Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead II. I watched this tape so much in my youth that it stopped working after it got snowy in some places. I love this movie and it was a stepping stone to the other Evil Dead movies. In fact, the original Evil Dead trilogy was the first movie I bought on DVD when Anchor Bay was still a thing. One of my favorite DVDs in my collection was Bruce Campbell’s Anchor Bay release against the Army of Darkness. It was a great release and I loved the artwork. I’ve watched it countless times in my life and I’m always looking for an excuse to watch it again. A few days ago, Scream Factory sent me the UHD Steelbook release of the movie for me to check out and I was happy to do so. Thank you Scream Factory!

**Spoiler Alert** The film follows Ash who finds himself in medieval times after using the Necronomicon to stop the evil that was unleashed in Evil Dead II. Now the king’s sage suspects he is the chosen one predicted in the book to stop the dead. He is sent on a journey to retrieve the book and place the incantation to stop them. However, he forgets the words and accidentally unleashes the hordes of dead on the castle and the innocent lives inside. Instead of fleeing, he stays behind to train the people and fight the dead in hopes of returning to his time. **Spoiler alert**

Army of Darkness is one of the craziest entries in the Evil Dead series, but it’s not as clunky as it sounds. It’s a fun mix of horror and fantasy that other movies would never bet on. Director Sam Raimi took a big risk on this movie and it paid off. In fact, it might not be the most beloved entry in the Evil Dead series, but it’s easily the most popular with many non-genre fans hailing this film for blending different genres.

The acting in this one is top-notch. Bruce Campbell never disappoints, and it was the beginning of the personality Ash is now known for. In the first Evil Dead movie, it’s more or less a last girl. He wears his heart on his sleeve and is a bit of a baby. In Evil Dead II, he starts to be a bit smarter, but he’s still a sweetheart who can carry slapstick humor. However, Army of Darkness shows him as the evil one we know and love. It has catchy dialogue and always carries the scene it’s in. Embeth Davidtz and Marcus Gilbert are great, as well as Sheila and Lord Arthur. In fact, the whole film is well acted. We have Patricia Tallman from Tom Savini’s Night of the Living Dead, horror legend Bill Moseley and the iconic Evil Ash, and even a cameo from Bridget Fonda to name a few.

This one’s story is unlike any other Evil Dead movie, but would be a major focus in the comic book series that would soon follow. The Evil Dead reboot would be somewhat of a homecoming, but this story will always stand out among fans due to how different it is from the other movies. The Necronomicon’s backstory is explored in more detail here with more lore and deadites added to the fold. We have warrior clans, knights, castles, dungeons, deadites, love and slapstick. The movie has perfect pacing and really works.

Finally, the film is full of practical effects. It’s not a gory movie, but we do get blood, drawings of fantastical creatures, and plenty of skeletons with rotting flesh. The practical effects are phenomenal and still look great to this day. All in all, Army of Darkness is a radical sequel to the classic Evil Dead II that fucking works. Fans of the genre don’t get much fantasy horror, but this one is fun for the whole family. The release of the Scream Factory Steelbook is a beauty and a must for fans of the franchise.

Special Features:
DISC ONE (THEATRICAL CUT – 4K UHD):
NEW 2022 4K scan of original camera negative approved by director Sam Raimi, cinematographer Bill Pope and editor Bob Murawski
In Dolby Vision (HDR 10 Compatible)
DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, 2.0

DISC TWO (THEATER CUT – BLU-RAY):
NEW 4K 2022 scan of original camera negative approved by director Sam Raimi, cinematographer Bill Pope and editor Bob Murawski
DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, 2.0
Medieval Times: The Making of “Army Of Darkness” – A feature length documentary with over 20 people interviewed, including star and co-producer Bruce Campbell, actors Ted Raimi, Bill Moseley and Patricia Tallman, and many more…
Original ending
Alternate opening with optional commentary by Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell
Deleted Scenes with Optional Commentary by Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell
Theatrical trailer
TV spots
American Video Promotion

DISC THREE – (DIRECTOR’S CUT – BLU-RAY):
DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, 2.0
Audio commentary with director Sam Raimi, actor Bruce Campbell and co-writer Ivan Raimi
Additional behind-the-scenes footage of KNB effects
Create the Deadites – Vintage Featurette
Vintage “Making Of” Featurette
Excerpts from extended interviews with Sam Raimi, Bruce Campbell and Robert Tapert

DISC FOUR – (INTERNATIONAL CUT – BLU-RAY):
DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, 2.0 (international cut)
TV version with additional footage (standard definition)
International theatrical trailer
Stills galleries with rare behind-the-scenes photos of production designer Anthony Tremblay, visual effects supervisor William Mesa, and special effects makeup artists Tony Gardner and KNB EFX, Inc. (over 200 stills)
Gallery of rare props and photos from the collection of super fan Dennis Carter Jr.
Storyboards for deleted or alternate scenes
The Men Behind the Army – Vintage Featurette

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Nostalgic photos of black British music scenes through the ages https://maxkol.org/nostalgic-photos-of-black-british-music-scenes-through-the-ages/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/nostalgic-photos-of-black-british-music-scenes-through-the-ages/ A club night run by jungle label Metalheadz. All photos: Eddie Otchere In the endless lyrics of Birdman, when you talk about Eddie Ochere you better put some respect on his name. The Brixton-born photographer has a catalog that spans the dawn of jungle music scene which was grown in 90s Britain and is embellished […]]]>
People at a nightclub run by jungle label Metalheadz.

A club night run by jungle label Metalheadz. All photos: Eddie Otchere

In the endless lyrics of Birdman, when you talk about Eddie Ochere you better put some respect on his name. The Brixton-born photographer has a catalog that spans the dawn of jungle music scene which was grown in 90s Britain and is embellished with portraits of some of hip hop’s most iconic MCs. He’s the man behind the lenses who captured the likes of the Wu-Tang Clan, Nas, Jay Z and Biggie Smalls. On British soil, he photographed pioneers like So Solid Crew, Tricky and Goldie.

He talks about his work and culture with passion and determination, unwavering in his vision to capture life’s sweetest moments as they are. “I knew why I was here. I knew I had to document my life, my scene, my people. And that’s it. Nobody else was going to do it for me,” he said. “Behind everything I do there is negativity, but I’m only trying to show you the opposite.”

For Black History Month, he worked alongside Holly Marie Catopassing on his know-how to novice photographers during an analog street and darkroom photography workshop in Leica Gallery London. He spoke to VICE about a career spent documenting the history of black music.

VICE: You were very active in the days of jungle music, but what about the genres that followed in black British music?
Eddie Ochere:
I need to shout out to the grime kids because they’ve grown up now, they’re real men now. They do the right thing, and respect that. I really like what they do and I like the way they do it. I’m a junglist kid so the grime kids always felt like the younger ones coming to our raves but they were even younger. When they found their own thing, it was like garage grime. Their sound evolved into their own thing, they created their own subculture. So when I saw D Double E and this group going crazy in a hotel i was in, respect for these kids man, they fucking hold it back. I was there to document the jungle scene but I wasn’t there to document the grime scene. I had then started having children, I was just busy. So that was the only time I was raving about these grime kids who are much older now – these photos were taken this year.

Rapper Grime at the microphone, photographed by Eddie Otchere

Can you tell us about some of the work you’ve done with Such a strong crew?
It was like a turn of the century. I was there for So Solid, I was there for the Battersea crowd and I was there to create their first iconography. And yes again, I’m proud of them. Proud of these guys, proud of what they’ve done, proud of how they’ve crossed the mainstream in their own way.

I remember very well that they had a number one with “21 Seconds” and they invited me to top pops come join them. And when I walked into the BBC, all I could smell was weed, and I was so proud of them because they were smoking the fucking place. It was a first, certainly for this generation. It was good to feel that the Battersea boys were doing well.

So Solid Crew in white outfits, photographed by Eddie Otchere

So Solid Crew. Photo: Eddie Otchere

What is the difference between photographing rappers versus DJs or producers?
Rappers are quite interesting because they come as ready-made, explosive creatures that are ready to jump on you. They have nothing but pure energy. But when I photographed junglist producers, they just didn’t want to be seen. As Shy FX is literally Shy FX – he is shy. He’s important but he just didn’t want to be seen so it’s very difficult. drum and bass the producers never wanted to do anything because they were really withdrawn people, which is great, actually, for me. It just meant that I had to approach it very differently. I also knew I had to document who they were because they are pioneers and leaders in the field.

Goldie was very supportive of me allowing me to come and shoot in his clubs and that meant I could meet them in the clubs, in context, so when we hooked up to do shoots it wasn’t like we we were strangers. It meant I had to put them at ease because they never wanted the limelight like a rapper wants the limelight.

Person at a club party run by jungle label Metalheadz, photographed by Eddie Otchere

A club night run by jungle label Metalheadz. Photo: Eddie Otchere

How important is Notting Hill Carnival to British culture and the work you do?
It made us [photographers] what we are. Come on, it’s not been a year since we went to the Carnival. It’s not been a year since we’ve gone there to take a picture. Even if it’s about you and your mother.

No city on Earth has two million delirious people on its streets and nothing is wrong. This year’s carnival was lit up, that’s undeniable. That’s what we’re here for. Like we brought this to you, you racist assholes. And we only did this because you were racist assholes. Because you came and tried to screw up our community. So we came back and fucked you and said you know what, we weren’t going to respond to your racism with violence. We will respond to your racism with love. And we go build something better than you. And that’s the carnival. It’s a group of not just Caribbeans, but also Africans – everyone coming together to make Notting Hill work.

Men installing a PA system at Notting Hill Carnival, photographed by Eddie Otchere

Installation of a public address system at the Notting Hill Carnival. Photo: Eddie Otchere

PA systems are an integral part of the carnival. What importance do you think they had for black British culture?
What’s good about black history and the future is that we’ve brought PA systems to this country. Sound systems then created jungle, club culture, bass culture, drum and bass, dubstep, hip hop. You can’t have hip hop without a PA system, so I really wanted to highlight PA systems as the best in Black history and the best in Black’s future. Because our history is oral. Our history is not written. Our history is spoken and we discuss. Public address systems are an extension of our history and therefore an extension of our future.

A Rasta raises his hand during the Notting Hill Carnival, photographed by Eddie Otchere
Pa Salieu and D Double E, photographed by Eddie Otchère

Pa Salieu and D Double E. Photo: Eddie Otchere

Little Simz in a black beanie raising his fingers to a gun at a party, photographed by Eddie Otchere

Little Simz. Photo: Eddie Otchere

Three black teenagers in 1990s UK, photographed by Eddie Otchere

Street photography of Otchere from the 90s. Photo: Eddie Otchere

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8 Best John Carpenter Movies That Aren’t ‘Halloween’ or ‘The Thing’ https://maxkol.org/8-best-john-carpenter-movies-that-arent-halloween-or-the-thing/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/8-best-john-carpenter-movies-that-arent-halloween-or-the-thing/ What makes a great filmmaker? Is it a singularity of vision, characterized by bold camera movements, stylized writing and the intersection of similar themes across decades of work? Maybe it’s the mastery of genre — one genre, two genres, maybe several? John Charpentier is definitely a master of horror. But dive a little deeper into […]]]>

What makes a great filmmaker? Is it a singularity of vision, characterized by bold camera movements, stylized writing and the intersection of similar themes across decades of work? Maybe it’s the mastery of genre — one genre, two genres, maybe several? John Charpentier is definitely a master of horror. But dive a little deeper into his filmography and you’ll find he even rises up about this lofty title.


RELATED: 10 Underrated Horror Movies From The 90s (And Where To Stream Them)His work is funny, incisive, sometimes more interested in ideas than in characters and sometimes the reverse. His camera is subtle, thanks in large part to his longtime cinematographer Dean Cundy. The color is not overly manipulated, the writing is simple and effective, and his scores, though often composed by him, rarely overshadow the on-screen action. Yet despite his restraint, he made all-time classics, and not just Halloween and The thing. John Carpenter is a master filmmaker because he can do anything and everything looks easy.

COLLIDER VIDEO OF THE DAY

“Assault on Compound 13” (1976)

For readers looking for something to wow them: Carpenter has published his second feature film, Assault on compound 13, when he was only 28 years old. Shot over 20 fast-paced days, Carpenter worked on a shoestring budget of $100,000 and created a bedroom action piece with all the nastiness of 1970s grindhouse cinema.

A group of people are trapped in a police station by a sadistic street gang. They have a choice: fight them or die. Initially, Ward 13 received mixed reviews due to its brutality, but over the years it has become a cult classic and an early sign of Carpenter’s prowess as a director. It has also, no doubt, inspired countless other films like this, including 2021’s little-seen, but well-reviewed Policeman.

“The Fog” (1980)

Fog is exactly what it sounds like. A deadly fog sweeps across a small coastal town in Northern California. Residents must find out what’s causing it before it’s too late…

When Carpenter saw the rough rough cut of Fog, he thought he had disaster on his hands. So he came out and shot a campfire prologue with John Houseman and doubled the amount of gore. The result was sublime horror. Fog, As Assault on compound 13, uses the sparseness of its setting and photography to convey a sense of secluded dread. Even though viewers can’t see the monsters, that doesn’t make them any less scary.

“Escape from New York” (1981)

It’s 1997. All of New York City is a prison. Without exaggeration, this might be the coolest movie premise of all time. John Carpenter Escape from New York stars Kurt Russell as Snake Plissken, a former super-soldier turned convict who must travel to New York to rescue… the President of the United States.

RELATED: Ranking of Carpenter/Russell collaborationsRussell does his best Clint Eastwood like the surly, bony Plissken, and the performance (as well as his role two years earlier in Carpenter’s Elvis) helped propel him to stardom. This is the first collaboration between the actor and the director, but fortunately not the last. They would team up two years later to The thing and six years later for the next pick on the list.

“Big Trouble in Little China” (1986)The cast of Big Trouble in Little China

Known as the master of horror, Carpenter is also one of the funniest directors around, and Big problem in little China may be his best comedy. How to explain the plot? Kurt Russell’s truck is stolen by an ancient Chinese group hoping to revive the evil wizard Lo Pan (James Hong). Now, Burton is on a quest to get his truck back…and defeat evil, too.

Throughout his career, Carpenter loved poking fun at the American leader’s bravado (see: They live, In the mouth of madness). This satire is sharpest here, where Russell’s Jack Burton doesn’t realize he is the sidekick of his own story. He’s a fool! Once, he gets so excited to fight that he shoots at the ceiling and knocks himself out with the rocks from the ceiling. Years before Marvel Superheroes, Carpenter separated the unnecessary narcissism of white American male leads, drawing a bold italic underline beneath their arrogance. In Little China, he asks: who are really the heroes of our stories?

“Prince of Darkness” (1987)

One of Carpenter’s most overlooked films may be one of his best: Prince of Darkness. A team of graduate physics students are brought in to search for a mysterious glowing green cylinder in the basement of a church. Soon however, they discover the infernal evil lurking within.

RELATED: “Prince of Darkness” is John Carpenter at his most apocalypticAlthough underestimated in its time, Prince of Darkness garnered a cult following, with some even calling it Carpenter’s scariest film. (Yes, he was the man who made Halloween and The thing). The second half is not for the faint of heart, especially for people of deep Catholic backgrounds who may or may not fear the rise of Satan.

“They Live” (1988)pjimage - 2022-03-02T113539.521

They live talks about many things: the police state, capitalist oppression, systematic tranquillization, etc. Moreover, it also features a professional wrestler Rowdy Roddy Piper so that’s okay for that, which is good. Piper’s character, John Nada, puts on a pair of sunglasses that show her the world as it really is.

Computer billboards actually say “OBEY”. Another with a woman in a bathing suit says: “GET MARRIED AND REPRODUCE”. Oh, and the ruling class of the planet are all actually hideous aliens controlling the world in secret. Jhi live is perhaps Carpenter’s most outspoken political film, but it never loses its sense of humor, not when Piper and keith david fight for six uninterrupted minutesand certainly not when Piper walks into a bank with a shotgun and says, “I came here to chew gum and kick ass…and I’m out of gum.”

“In the Mouth of Madness” (1994)in the mouth of madness john carpenter

When the world’s most famous horror writer (think Stephen King) vanishes into thin air, a brilliant insurance investigator (played by Sam Neil) is hired to find him. The investigator is skeptical that this isn’t just one big publicity stunt from the publishing house…until he visits the mysterious Hobb’s End.

Although billed as a horror movie, In the mouth of madness may secretly be one of Carpenter’s best comedies, in large part due to a performance by Neill reminiscent of Cary Grant in From North to Northwest. It is also undoubtedly Carpenter’s most meta movie. Spoiler: At the end, the character of Neill will see the film version of In the mouth of madness, and the poster says “Directed by John Carpenter”. In a film that begins with its end, In the mouth of madness somehow keeps viewers guessing from minute to minute.

“Escape Los Angeles” (1996)escape-from-la-kurt-russell-social-star

Carpenter’s only sequel doesn’t have the precise focus of the original or the same commitment to its premise. It does not present the horrors of Prince of Darkness or the precise satire of They live Where big problem soon China. But he has one thing: Snake Plissken surfs with Pierre Fonda.

Roger Ebert gave Escape Los Angeles three and a half stars and wrote that the public could also enjoy it as a satire of the sequel genre or as the authentic article. Viewers can make up their own minds, but for what it’s worth: there’s a scene where Snake Plissken has to save his own life by hitting a half court. Four out of four stars.

NEXT: Movies like “Big Trouble in Little China” for more thrills

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Get a FREE £10 Just Eat voucher when you subscribe to Digital Camera mag! https://maxkol.org/get-a-free-10-just-eat-voucher-when-you-subscribe-to-digital-camera-mag/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/get-a-free-10-just-eat-voucher-when-you-subscribe-to-digital-camera-mag/ The world’s first digital photography magazine, Digital Camera was launched in 2002 and has been helping photographers of all skill levels improve their images for two decades. Each issue contains tech tips, tutorials, inspiring images and expert buying advice, plus the latest gear news and reviews, plus a selection of fabulous freebies – these include […]]]>

The world’s first digital photography magazine, Digital Camera was launched in 2002 and has been helping photographers of all skill levels improve their images for two decades.

Each issue contains tech tips, tutorials, inspiring images and expert buying advice, plus the latest gear news and reviews, plus a selection of fabulous freebies – these include cards of photo tips, how-to videos and an e-book camera buying guide.

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