Photography genres – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 05:52:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Photography genres – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 What is the Dutch angle and why is it actually German? https://maxkol.org/what-is-the-dutch-angle-and-why-is-it-actually-german/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 04:05:51 +0000 https://maxkol.org/what-is-the-dutch-angle-and-why-is-it-actually-german/ The word “Dutch” has been used a number of times in various expressions to describe several different actions. Whether you’re going “Dutch” after dining out with friends, or taking part in a bit of “Dutch courage” before a first date, the word is extremely versatile. What you might not know is that the “Dutch” label […]]]>

The word “Dutch” has been used a number of times in various expressions to describe several different actions. Whether you’re going “Dutch” after dining out with friends, or taking part in a bit of “Dutch courage” before a first date, the word is extremely versatile. What you might not know is that the “Dutch” label also has a place in contemporary Hollywood, with the technique commonly referred to as the Dutch angle.

But what is the Dutch angle, and is it even really Dutch? Let’s find out.

What is the Dutch angle?

Simply put, the Dutch angle – also known as the Dutch tilt – is a type of camera used in photography and film that places the subject at a (slight) angle. Examples of this technique can be found in modern film and television.

In technical terms, this visual is achieved by tilting the camera along the x-axis so that the horizon line of the shot is not parallel to the bottom line of the camera frame.

The angle is usually used to represent a feeling of tension or distress or to confuse the viewer. This means that the camera angle was originally particularly popular in the horror and thriller genres, but as film and television have evolved, so has the technique. These days, you can recognize the Dutch angle in nearly every type of visual media, from stock footage and selfies to award-winning films.

Where does the name Dutch angle come from?

Although the technique may be relatively simple, the history of the Dutch angle is certainly interesting. To understand where the term “Dutch angle” comes from, we have to go back to the 1910s, when Europe was on the brink of war. The German government was quick to take control of the domestic film industry, monitoring all content and production by mainstream German filmmakers and banning all foreign media.

This meant that the German film industry took a very different approach to cinema, as the medium developed a distinct voice and tone largely influenced by German and Austrian expressionist painters such as Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Max Beckmann. As a result, German cinema at the time was filled with haunting imagery and awkward angles, resulting in films such as The Office of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920) – a film widely credited with pioneering the Dutch angle – a very distinct tone and look.

You might be wondering what all of this has to do with the Netherlands, and the answer is: nothing. You might have guessed this already, but originally the Dutch angle was actually called the Deutsch angle (AKA the German angle). Over time, as the technique became more popular with international filmmakers such as Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock, the two words were interchanged, creating what is now known as the Dutch angle.

Examples of the Dutch angle in modern cinema

So how popular is it these days? Well, you can find examples and variations of the Dutch angle in almost every film genre – from thriller to comedy. Some directors in particular are known to have used the Dutch angle to good effect, while some films are known to be a little less successful.

Here is a list of some famous contemporary films that featured the Dutch angle:

  • Thor (Kevin Feige, 2011)
  • do the right thing (Spike Lee, 1989)
  • To tear out (Guy Ritchie, 2000)
  • inglorious bastards (Quentin Tarantino, 2009)
  • Batman (Leslie H. Martinson, 1966)
  • Corpse bride (Tim Burton, 2005)

VOX Video

Would you like to know more about this famous cinematographic technique? Watch the video below.

So the next time you decide to sit down in the bank with friends or family – whether at your local cinema or curled up on the couch at home with Netflix – keep an eye out for examples of the Dutch corner!

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Inside the whale’s belly with Sjón https://maxkol.org/inside-the-whales-belly-with-sjon/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 10:00:13 +0000 https://maxkol.org/inside-the-whales-belly-with-sjon/ When talking about his work, Sjón rejects the word “fantastic”. Fantastic, he says, implies unreality. Even the most improbable events in his books, he claims, are not unreal – they originate from the soil of Icelandic history and are real to his characters, even though they only occur in their minds, under form of erroneous […]]]>

When talking about his work, Sjón rejects the word “fantastic”. Fantastic, he says, implies unreality. Even the most improbable events in his books, he claims, are not unreal – they originate from the soil of Icelandic history and are real to his characters, even though they only occur in their minds, under form of erroneous perceptions or hallucinations. Instead, Sjón prefers the word “wonderful”. His work, and his country, are full of wonders: strange things that emerge and flow, all the time, on the basis of reality. The marvelous is all around us, he insists. We just need the vision to see it.

Sjon’s full name is Sigurjón Birgir Sigurdsson – a cascade of soft Gs and rolling Rs that sound, when he says it, like a liquid secret song, sung deep in his throat, to a shy baby horse. He was born in 1962, in a Reykjavík that was, in many ways, still a village: small, drab, remote, conservative, homogeneous. Iceland looked like the edge of the world and Sjón grew up on the edge of this edge. He was the only child of a single mother, and they moved, when he was 10, to a freshly sunk neighborhood on the outskirts of town called Breidholt. (By Reykjavík’s miniature standards, the outskirts mean about a 10-minute drive to the city center.) Breidholt was intended accommodation: a large complex of brutalist concrete apartment buildings isolated in a muddy wasteland. Every time it rained, the parking lot turned into a brown lake. And yet this wasteland was surrounded by ancient Icelandic beauty: moors, trees, birds, a river full of leaping salmon. Sjón often thinks of this juxtaposition: these two very different worlds, between which he switched at will. The fluidity of the landscape, he says, helped create a similar fluidity in his imagination.

As a child, Sjón was precocious, eager for world culture. He remembers watching “Mary Poppins” at the age of 4 and being shocked by a strange moment at the end when the handle of his umbrella, shaped like a parrot, suddenly opens its beak and speaks. (“I still haven’t recovered,” he says.) As a teenager, Sjón fell in love with David Bowie, and for years he studied Bowie’s interviews as programs, researching every artist he had. mentioned, learning about international books and music. Finally, he discovers surrealism. It was exactly what was needed: jarring realities stacked on top of each other without explanation, transition, or excuse. Sjón became obsessed – a surrealist evangelist. It was then that he adopted the pseudonym Sjón. It was a perfect literary branding: his first name, Sigurjón, with the middle extracted. In Icelandic, sjon means “vision”.

Iceland in the 1970s was a strange place to be a teenager, especially with artistic ambitions. Reykjavík, the only real city in the country, had two cafes and two hotels. Sjón told me that the most exciting event for young people was a ritual known as “Hallaerisplanid” – a word that roughly translates to “Hardship Square” or, more colorfully, “The Cringe Zone”. Every weekend, huge masses of teenagers swarmed the city’s seedy little central plaza, then roamed for hours in loud, rowdy packs, looping over and over the narrow downtown streets. Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, visiting Reykjavík, watched these thousands of kids from their hotel window with fascination. It would have been a perfectly existentialist spectacle – restless hordes, facing a vast nothingness, creating meaning by decree, through an absurd, provocative, repetitive, arbitrary ritual.

For Sjón, Reykjavík’s gloom was both impossible and ideal. He didn’t have much help, but he was free to become whatever he wanted. So he did. At 16, he published his first collection of poetry himself, then sold it to a captive audience on the bus. From his brutalist apartment building, he wrote awe-inspiring letters to surrealists around the world, declaring a new Icelandic front of the movement. His mailbox was filled with replies from Japan, Portugal, Brazil, France. Eventually, Sjón was invited to visit ancient surrealists in Europe. While staying with André Breton’s widow in France, he swam in a river and had a visionary experience with a dragonfly: it sat on his shoulder, vibrating its wings, then took off – and at that time he felt he had been baptized into a new existence.

Returning to Reykjavík, Sjón helped found a surrealist group called Medúsa, in which he recruited other ambitious teenagers. One of those recruits was a girl from her neighborhood – a singer who would become, at the end of the 20th century, possibly the most famous Icelandic woman in the world. Björk was a musical prodigy; she got her first recording contract at age 11, after a song she performed for a school recital was broadcast on Iceland’s only radio station. She met Sjón at the age of 17, when he walked into the French hot chocolate store where she worked in the city center. Björk told me in an email that she was a “super introvert” at the time. She and Sjón formed a strong, acrobatic two-person group called Rocka Rocka Drum – “a liberating alter ego” to each of them, she recalls.

The members of Medúsa made noise all over Reykjavík. They argued over literature and threw art exhibitions in a garage and threw themselves into some bohemian freaks. Once, all the surrealists got drunk on absinthe and started roaming Reykjavík entirely on the rooftops of parked cars – one night that ended at a popular club, where Sjón bit a bouncer in the thigh, then recited André Breton’s “Manifesto of Surrealism”. ”While lying face down in a police car. The Surrealists saw this as a great victory when they were denounced in the newspapers by the conservative Icelandic literary establishment. In one of the biggest thrills of his life, Sjón once heard himself attacked personally, over the radio, while riding the bus. Björk found it all exhilarating. “It was,” she told me, “like being absorbed into a magnificent DIY organic university: extreme fertility!

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Litchfield’s Tracy Walton Embraces Producer Role for Fellow Musicians | News https://maxkol.org/litchfields-tracy-walton-embraces-producer-role-for-fellow-musicians-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/litchfields-tracy-walton-embraces-producer-role-for-fellow-musicians-news/ LITCHFIELD – Tucked away in a quiet corner of Campville Road in the city’s Northfield neighborhood is On Deck Sound Studio, Tracy Walton’s creative space, where vocals and instruments come together to create incredible music. Walton, a singer and musician who has recorded solo and in collaboration with hundreds of performers, has found his latest […]]]>

LITCHFIELD – Tucked away in a quiet corner of Campville Road in the city’s Northfield neighborhood is On Deck Sound Studio, Tracy Walton’s creative space, where vocals and instruments come together to create incredible music.

Walton, a singer and musician who has recorded solo and in collaboration with hundreds of performers, has found his latest niche in the production world, helping new artists and longtime professionals record new albums and often a accompanying video. Singer-songwriter Kristy Flagg has just completed an album, and singer Riley Cotton is also recording an album with Walton’s band.

In 2020 and 2021, Walton’s concert schedule was cut short by the pandemic. He had a concert planned at the Warner Theater in 2021, but it still hasn’t been rescheduled. During this time, he is very busy with a variety of artists, all of whom want to share their music with the world.

“I was planning on (touring) 20 or 30 states after releasing my last album in 2019, and that never happened,” he said. “But I was already in this mode of production, and it’s my job now … I’m set up here to do this.”

On Deck is a sound studio complete with space for drums, guitar, and other stringed instruments – many of which hang on the wall in the same room – as well as keyboards and a piano. Outside the studio is the control room where he records the music and works with the artists.

For Flagg’s album, Walton plays guitar and vocals; he is joined by drummer Steve Peck, guitarist Jeff Howard and pianist Glenn Nelson. Taking the singer’s voice and adding those components is the process of creating songs for the album, he said.

“I’m doing whatever it takes to make this record,” he said. “Who inspires them? And who is the best musician to play that person’s music? It’s my job.

“When a person comes to me as a singer-songwriter, they have their song; it’s the only way they’ve ever heard it, ”he said. “I have to find out who are the best musicians to play this music and put them together with the singer. That’s my philosophy: to find the team that can make great records and count on them to come and create a community on the bridge.

Walton also works with the group “Growing Giants” which he says “is becoming a group”. The hard rock sound of the band is a combination of the vocals of vocalist Rob Zawista, drummer Matt Starr, who performs for Kiss’ Ace Frehly, and other longtime musicians.

“I’ve known Rob since middle school and we’ve played at clubs in the area together. We once said, ‘Let’s do something’ and this is what it looks like, ‘Walton said. “There’s an amazing group of guys doing this. “

Walton is from Torrington and a graduate of the Hartford Conservatory. He previously taught at the National Guitar Workshop and wrote three books on bass for Alfred Publishing. He also released three solo albums. In the mid-2000s, he and singer Julia Autumn-Ford formed the duo, Belle of the Fall, which performed locally and on tour. Autumn-Ford recently joined On Deck as an assistant engineer and videographer.

On his website for On Deck, Walton tells readers about his studio, “The studio is located in the woods of northwestern CT, so if you’re looking for a bustling town for your record, this isn’t it. However, if you want to get away from it all to relax and make a good record this would be the place for you … Every day you will find Glen Nelson here following an organ part, Julia Autumn Ford posing backing vocals killer, Steve Peck crushing a drum track, Ben Dean, Pete Adams, Jeff Chen, etc. I am fortunate to have extremely talented friends.

These friends are able to play a variety of genres, from folk and Americana to jazz, rock, reggae and funk.

“I’m also working on a gospel album right now,” he said. “Anything with live instruments, I can do. “

Joanne Cash, sister of Johnny Cash, sings on a number of songs on this particular album.

“I think she’s 80 years old now,” he said. “She looks pretty amazing. The idea of ​​any recording is to find the center of a circle of musicians and add those pieces to the sound. People come up with a song and we have to turn it into a (performance) with a band. “

On Deck can also do album art, photography, CD setups, and video.

“We’re all-inclusive from start to finish,” Walton said.

His next step as a producer is to take a specific group of artists and do a project together, “to do something brilliant,” he said.

“Twenty years ago I was writing books and teaching, and I loved it; but I was looking for something else, ”he said.

Learn more about On Deck Sound Studio at ondecksound.com, and about Tracy Walton at tracywalton.com.

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In the air! How to capture great airplane photos https://maxkol.org/in-the-air-how-to-capture-great-airplane-photos/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 08:30:43 +0000 https://maxkol.org/in-the-air-how-to-capture-great-airplane-photos/ From a young age, I have always been fascinated by military planes. Also, my dad and grandpa were both passionate about photography, and it seems their enthusiasm has become part of me. At air shows I find it best to use Auto ISO, just so you don’t have to worry about selecting the right sensitivity […]]]>

From a young age, I have always been fascinated by military planes. Also, my dad and grandpa were both passionate about photography, and it seems their enthusiasm has become part of me.

At air shows I find it best to use Auto ISO, just so you don’t have to worry about selecting the right sensitivity – especially with all the action going on! I always set my maximum to ISO 32,000, but I rarely get close unless the weather is terrible. Using a variety of software, I will fine-tune my photos while editing and find these programs incredibly helpful in correcting any issues with high ISO images.



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Matthews Opera House opens 2022 with jazz concert and art exhibition https://maxkol.org/matthews-opera-house-opens-2022-with-jazz-concert-and-art-exhibition/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/matthews-opera-house-opens-2022-with-jazz-concert-and-art-exhibition/ RAPID CITY, SD (KEVN) – The Matthews Opera House and Arts Center offers the community of Black Hills and beyond a space for creativity and entertainment. After a busy holiday season, the start of 2022 also has a lot to offer the community. “We are resuming our popular Bellman Brown Bag lecture series this month,” […]]]>

RAPID CITY, SD (KEVN) – The Matthews Opera House and Arts Center offers the community of Black Hills and beyond a space for creativity and entertainment.

After a busy holiday season, the start of 2022 also has a lot to offer the community.

“We are resuming our popular Bellman Brown Bag lecture series this month,” said Darren Granaas, executive director of opera. “On Wednesday January 12 at noon in our theater, Professor BHSU Desy Schoenewies will brief our residents on the ongoing programs at the Black Hills State University Art Club. She will also talk about the upcoming opportunities for community members to be part of another city mural that will be erected next to the Old Town Hall. It’s free to the public, and we’ve got amazing hot coffee to warm everyone up, provided by our sponsor Common Grounds. We’ll also feature South Dakota legends Jami Lynn (our very own Spearfish icon) and the JAS Quintet from Sioux Falls. Jami is of course a prolific singer / songwriter who explores and mixes bluegrass, folk, pop and jazz genres in interesting ways. JAS has been the preeminent jazz combo in the upper Midwest for quite some time now, and their partnership with Jami goes back several years. When they play together it’s really something to see. We last hosted them in fall 2019, so we’re delighted to see them back. I was lucky enough to see them perform more recent and reworked material. I hope they play their version of Billie Holiday’s “Trav’lin Light”. All of this will take place on January 14 at 7:30 p.m. Cabaret style tables and top notch wines will be available for this performance. Tickets are $ 30 for table seats and $ 20 for balcony seats.

“The Matthews will be presenting an art exhibit by art teachers and BHSU students,” Granaas continued. “It will present paintings, drawings, 3D works, photographs and digital works based on the theme ‘out of the box’. The show opens next Monday (January 10) and there will be an opening reception on Friday January 14 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Matthews will also be hosting a free mural painting event co-sponsored by the BHSU Art Club. This event will take place in our theater on Saturday, January 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. From 5 years old, no painting skills required! the painful sections will be reconstructed as a mural later this spring in downtown Spearfish. “

Copyright 2022 KEVN. All rights reserved.


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Banat Collective’s latest exhibition is a bold representation of femininity https://maxkol.org/banat-collectives-latest-exhibition-is-a-bold-representation-of-femininity/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:20:27 +0000 https://maxkol.org/banat-collectives-latest-exhibition-is-a-bold-representation-of-femininity/ Palestinian artist Samia Halaby talks about her latest exhibition, “Flurrying” DUBAI: Palestinian artist Samia Halaby, who just turned 85, has been painting for over 60 years, and she continues to learn and discover. “Absolutely, you keep learning,” she told Arab News from her New York studio. “If you stop learning, you repeat yourself; it becomes […]]]>

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby talks about her latest exhibition, “Flurrying”

DUBAI: Palestinian artist Samia Halaby, who just turned 85, has been painting for over 60 years, and she continues to learn and discover.

“Absolutely, you keep learning,” she told Arab News from her New York studio. “If you stop learning, you repeat yourself; it becomes a performance, and at what point does it get boring?

Halaby’s latest exhibition, “Flurrying,” which ran through Jan. 5 at the Ayyam Gallery in Dubai, features a series of personal memories and scattered shapes intertwined on abstract canvases, some of which were painted during the locking. She experiments with hand movements, creating geometric and gestural compositions bursting with color and movement.

“Evening in the Desert”, 2019. (Provided)

A 2021 coin shares the show’s name. The canvas is full of vibrant lines, almost attacking each other, representing a spectacle observed by Halaby on a winter’s day. “It was snowing between two buildings and the wind was blowing the snow in all kinds of directions,” she recalls. “I took a video of it and thought, ‘Aha! This is the answer to all the questions I ask myself.

For Halaby, her art is trying to capture small moments that catch her eye and stay in her mind. “We’ve all seen dandelions fly, snow flurries or rain fall,” she explains. “Our brain registers them, our eye registers them. We may not have the verbal language to express them, but I have given you visual language to express them.

In “Evening in the Desert”, painted in 2019, a kaleidoscope of squares and cubes roams in shades of purple, blue and yellow. “It’s a very special moment,” she says. “A good friend invited my sister and I to dinner in Jordan. We drove to Ghor (in the Jordan Valley) and had a great day. On the way back, the sun was setting and I couldn’t believe what I was looking at: the beauty of the color; the subtlety, the fine differences.

“Surprising Trails”, 2019. (Provided)

Another piece on display was inspired by a conversation between Halaby and a fellow Palestinian painter, who creates works based on calligraphy. “She said, ‘I think of my parents and write them letters to tell them about what we are going through in Palestine,” said Halaby. “She was crying as she wrote these letters. It was so touching. So, I was kind of influenced by her.

“Written in White Air for Palestine” is rendered in a flurry of brush marks, in which you can almost spot an Arabic letter or two, as part of what she calls the “calligraphic movement”. It strikes near us in several ways.

“Flurrying”, 2021. (Provided)

Born in Jerusalem, Halaby left her homeland 70 years ago. She started painting during her childhood. “I remember my paternal aunt once found me making paintbrushes out of chicken feathers,” she says. “My sister and her friend would ask me to draw for them. The idea of ​​becoming a professional painter was thanks to my mother, who encouraged me.

Since the age of 14, Halaby has lived in the United States, but the memory of his true homeland still influences his art. “My commitment to Palestine is permanent. It’s part of me, ”she says. “I experienced the heartbreak of my father and my mother and their generation. “

Halaby is now a member of a respected group of Arab modernists of the second half of the 20th century; she is friends with the Jordanian sculptor Mona Saudi and has exchanged letters with the late poet and painter Etel Adnan. An admirer of nature and Islamic geometry, abstraction is and has been her profession, which she describes as “the language of the future for painting”.

“Written with a Brush”, 2019. (Provided)

Even with all of her years of experience, she says it can still be difficult to know when a painting is finished. “It’s one of the hardest things. I don’t think I have a (complete) answer, ”she said. “It’s easy to ruin a painting, but it’s also important to recognize that you have ruined it as well. “

There is something warm and reassuring about Halaby – she encourages viewers to stick to their own interpretation and understanding of a work of art, even if it is not the one its producer intended.

“I think viewers should trust their own feelings. When you look at a painting and see clues, you have to trust it, ”she says. “The fact that you come to the board and see something there – whatever you see – makes me feel better.”


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Bryan Adams | Bryan Adams wants to direct a movie https://maxkol.org/bryan-adams-bryan-adams-wants-to-direct-a-movie/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 11:27:18 +0000 https://maxkol.org/bryan-adams-bryan-adams-wants-to-direct-a-movie/ Bryan Adams wants to direct a movie. The 62-year-old singer has also carved out a successful career as a photographer and he believes his skills would be transferable to film as well. He said: “I would indeed be interested [in making a film]. I can easily see myself as a director of photography, maybe even […]]]>

Bryan Adams wants to direct a movie.

The 62-year-old singer has also carved out a successful career as a photographer and he believes his skills would be transferable to film as well.

He said: “I would indeed be interested [in making a film]. I can easily see myself as a director of photography, maybe even a director.

“I remember working with Laszlo Kovacs, who did ‘Easy Rider’, on one of my first videos.

“He had a drink around his neck and was constantly watching the cloud formations waiting for the right light. Pure genius!

Bryan believes technological developments have completely changed the landscape of photography.

He told Ramp Style magazine, “With smartphone cameras that can capture every moment, anyone can become a photographer.

“The future will be more interactive and intense, and there will be more cameras documenting everything all the time.

“Police body cameras have infrared capabilities to check your body temperature, there will be more drones… these are just a few examples.

“That doesn’t mean it’s a bad thing, because we now see the world like never before.

“One of the most important things is that people use their cameras to document atrocities. Everyone is a photojournalist.

“From eco-terrorism to George Floyd, photos and videos have completely changed our world overnight.”

Although he has photographed a range of people and places over the years, it is his portraits of his family that matter most to the “Heaven” hitmaker.

When asked which of his photos said the most about him, he replied, “Photos of my family. I cherish them more than anything.

“I sat down with my grandfather and photographed him when he was 89 years old. We talked about his time as a Royal Engineer during the World Wars. He was so humble. I miss my grandparents terribly.


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Adopt a hobby, like this one for busy people https://maxkol.org/adopt-a-hobby-like-this-one-for-busy-people/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:20:50 +0000 https://maxkol.org/adopt-a-hobby-like-this-one-for-busy-people/ Village news / Courtesy photo Discover new music or find old favorites and create digital playlists for activities of daily living, such as backyard barbecues or commuting. FALLBROOK – Devoting time to personal activities can provide a sense of accomplishment and a break from the daily grind. Hobbies can also improve physical and mental health […]]]>

Village news / Courtesy photo

Discover new music or find old favorites and create digital playlists for activities of daily living, such as backyard barbecues or commuting.

FALLBROOK – Devoting time to personal activities can provide a sense of accomplishment and a break from the daily grind. Hobbies can also improve physical and mental health in a number of ways.

People with tight schedules may find themselves too busy to indulge in leisure activities. In such cases, individuals should look for activities that do not require too much time commitment.

Photography

Photos can be taken just about anywhere at any time, making photography ideal for busy people. With advancements in cell phone cameras, individuals don’t even need a high-tech or expensive camera to take great photos.

Cooking

Everyone has a need to eat, making cooking a very useful pastime. Many people who cook for fun also find how relaxing it can be to prepare a meal.

Organize music playlists

Music enthusiasts can take advantage of the many music streaming services to keep their own records. Discover new music or find old favorites and create digital playlists for activities of daily living, such as backyard barbecues or commuting. Various streaming sites allow users to make playlists public so that they can be shared with others who enjoy the same musical genres.

Reading

The benefits of reading are numerous. Reading builds readers’ vocabulary, can teach them about current events, provides escape, and also serves as a brain exercise, potentially delaying age-related cognitive decline. Reading can be a solitary endeavor carried out during short or long periods of free time. It can also be shared with others through book clubs and other book groups.

Scrapbooking

Photographs are now routinely relegated to digital cloud storage, where they linger in a kind of digital limbo. Scrapbooking inspires people not only to print their photos, but to get creative by associating them with designs, sayings and other keepsakes.

Busy people don’t have to put aside their hobbies because they feel like they are running out of time. Many activities do not require a lot of time but still offer a multitude of benefits.


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Trends 2022: what’s next for your favorite outdoor technology? https://maxkol.org/trends-2022-whats-next-for-your-favorite-outdoor-technology/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 08:03:25 +0000 https://maxkol.org/trends-2022-whats-next-for-your-favorite-outdoor-technology/ The main issue in the outdoor tech world this year has not only been the excitement of the products themselves, but maintaining sufficient stock in the supply chain, as well as ensuring have all the components in the right place at the right time. to build the devices in the first place. Even the world’s […]]]>

The main issue in the outdoor tech world this year has not only been the excitement of the products themselves, but maintaining sufficient stock in the supply chain, as well as ensuring have all the components in the right place at the right time. to build the devices in the first place. Even the world’s largest e-trader often displayed the message “stock expected soon”.

While the confident push for innovation may have temporarily slowed down, it hasn’t completely stopped, and products have come out of the pipeline and continue to do so.


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54% of Indian Singles More Concerned About Dating Now: Bumble https://maxkol.org/54-of-indian-singles-more-concerned-about-dating-now-bumble/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 04:53:50 +0000 https://maxkol.org/54-of-indian-singles-more-concerned-about-dating-now-bumble/ New Delhi: With singles in India keen to form more meaningful relationships than ever before, 2021 saw young people look for similar dating intentions in potential partners before striking up a conversation, according to the dating app Bumble. A majority of singles (54%) in India are more aware of how and when to date, he […]]]>

New Delhi: With singles in India keen to form more meaningful relationships than ever before, 2021 saw young people look for similar dating intentions in potential partners before striking up a conversation, according to the dating app Bumble. A majority of singles (54%) in India are more aware of how and when to date, he says.

These are based on internal Bumble information between January and November 2021.

Additionally, since the launch of Bumble Interest Badges in March, the top three categories of interest for Gen Z and Millennial Indian users were ‘Movie & TV’, ‘Food & Drink’, and ‘ sports ”. Action, adventure and comedy were the two main genres of choice for Indians who adopted the “Film and TV” badge of interest on their Bumble profiles. While Bollywood was another top choice for millennials, anime was the most popular genre among millennials. In 2021, Bumble users in India selected filters such as “Photography”, “Coffee”, “Dogs”, “Pubs” and “Kitchen” most often on the application to prioritize the search for a partner with common values ​​and intentions.

While cooking, video games, and gardening were some of the most popular ‘staying indoors’ activities, pubs and clubs, cafes, and standing out were the top ‘hanging out’ activities for the Bumble community. in India. Based on those who selected “Values ​​and Alliance” as their interest, “Environmentalism,” “Feminism” and “The LGBTQIA + Ally” were the top picks for Indians on Bumble profiles.

Additionally, beaches were the first choice for Indians on Bumble, followed by road trips and hiking as top travel activities in 2021.

Zodiac signs continue to be a hot topic within the Bumble community. The Lions on Bumble were the luckiest lovers in the world. They had the most matches of any astrological sign, followed by Scorpio and Libra in India.

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