Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 01:54:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 Uvalde journalists are blocked, harassed, threatened by the police https://maxkol.org/uvalde-journalists-are-blocked-harassed-threatened-by-the-police/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/uvalde-journalists-are-blocked-harassed-threatened-by-the-police/ Placeholder while loading article actions UVALDE, Texas — Reporters had been threatened with arrest for getting too close to mourners, so Houston Chronicle reporter Julian Gill stayed in the designated media area when reporting on the funeral the week after the massacre at Robb Elementary School. Nonetheless, a phalanx of uniformed bikers confronted Gill outside […]]]>
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UVALDE, Texas — Reporters had been threatened with arrest for getting too close to mourners, so Houston Chronicle reporter Julian Gill stayed in the designated media area when reporting on the funeral the week after the massacre at Robb Elementary School.

Nonetheless, a phalanx of uniformed bikers confronted Gill outside the cemetery gates. They called themselves the “guardians of the children” and claimed to work with police who stood guard.

“I’m not trying to bother anybody, guys,” Gill told the bikers, in a video he uploaded. “I’m not trying to ask anyone questions. I just wanted to watch. That’s all we can do, right? »

But the bikers still followed and harassed the reporters, writes Gill in the Chronicle. When he accidentally hit a guard who claimed to be a paramedic, the bikers accused him of assault and battery. “As a civil servant, it’s a kind of crime,” the motorcyclist-paramedic said in the video.

A month after the deaths of 19 children and two educators at Robb Elementary School, a picture emerges of a disastrous police response, during which officers from multiple law enforcement agencies waited an hour outside a classroom unlocked where children were trapped with the abuser. But the journalists who flocked to Uvalde, Texas, from across the country to tell this story faced near-constant interference, intimidation and blockages from some of the same authorities — not just bikers claiming to have police punishment.

Journalists have been threatened with arrest for “trespassing” outside public buildings. They were banned from public meetings and refused basic information about what the police did during the May 24 attack. After several initial error-filled press conferences, officials routinely declined interview requests and refused to hold press briefings. The situation has been made even more difficult by the web of local and state agencies involved in the response to and investigation of the shooting, some of which now blame each other for the chaos.

“Our journalists covered [the 2017 massacre in] Sutherland Springs, the Fort Hood shooting, and some are very experienced, having been embedded in the military in Afghanistan, having covered revolutions in Latin America, and none of them remembered an experience like this” said Marc Duvoisin, editor of the San Antonio Express-News. “The interference was so intense and with no identifiable public safety purpose.”

Duvoisin complained to Uvalde town leaders and some police chiefs — one of whom apologized, he said. Some of its journalists nevertheless asked not to be sent back to Uvalde, or confessed to feeling guilty about their work there. The harassment became so severe that the newspaper’s photo editor asked photographers to document their treatment by the police.

A photographer, William Luther, reported that police repeatedly pushed reporters away from a motorcade to the cemetery on May 31: first on the street, then on a sidewalk where a taqueria owner had previously given them permission to stand up. He said an officer falsely told him the owner had demanded he leave and threatened him when he offered to apologize: “If you enter this taqueria, I will arrest you.

Police were documented repeatedly obstructing photographers in public spaces over the following days, sometimes standing or parking vehicles directly in front of their cameras. Officials with the Texas Department of Public Safety and Uvalde Police did not respond to requests for comment.

“The police wouldn’t let us work,” said Antonio Guillen, a photographer at the Univision station in San Antonio. “We were seen as enemies.”

Meanwhile, law enforcement has resisted releasing information that could shed light on how police responded to the attack. Duvoisin said the “information crisis” in Uvalde began when school officials posted a notice on Facebook that Robb Elementary School had been closed.

Reporters and editors could not reach any Uvalde authority able to provide background information for the next few hours, he said. There was no briefing by local police, no reporting of the facts of the events and few, if any, returned calls. The first public address came not from local authorities, as is often the case after mass shootings, but from the governor of Texas, several hours after the carnage ended.

It is not uncommon for public information to be lacking in the aftermath of a disaster, or for residents to become irritated when hordes of journalists converge on a small town. But the pattern of miscommunication, obstruction and intimidation at Uvalde surprised even journalists with decades of experience and led some to suspect it was intentional.

State officials held a disastrous press conference two days after the attack, in which Texas Department of Public Safety spokesman Victor Escalon ignored calls to provide information in Spanish (Uvalde County’s population is mostly Hispanic) and lacked basic information such as how long it took from police. arrive after the first call to 911. “Could someone have arrived sooner?” he told reporters. “You have to understand, little town.”

In the weeks that followed, officials declined to release information that could explain why officers missed opportunity after opportunity to confront the attacker earlier and potentially save lives.

The Texas Tribune and ProPublica jointly submitted 70 public information requests to state, local and federal agencies, seeking documents such as ballistics reports and death certificates. They received two “partial” releases, according to Sewell Chan, editor of the Texas Tribune, which has done some of the most comprehensive reporting on the Uvalde tragedy. He said several agencies either didn’t respond or asked the state’s attorney general to review the request — a process that typically takes months.

Uvalde Mayor Don McLaughlin last week accused state authorities of selectively releasing information to local law enforcement officials, rather than DPS officers who also responded to the shooting. “I actually wonder who’s in charge of this investigation, because you can’t get a straight answer,” McLaughlin said.

But transparency watchdogs suspect bureaucratic confusion is an excuse for the delay. “It’s a handy accessory,” said Kelley Shannon, executive director of the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas. “It’s an excuse. They can divulge all the information they want.

Senator Roland Gutierrez, a Democrat representing Uvalde, filed a lawsuit Last week against DPS to compel him to disclose his records. A coalition of news organizations that includes parent companies CNN, CBS News, ABC News and TelevisaUnivision are discussing a similar lawsuit.

Meanwhile, journalists continue to face obstacles as they attempt to gather information from the field.

During a committee hearing in Uvalde last week of Texas House lawmakers investigating law enforcement response at the massacre, a fire marshal announced that all reporters should leave the building and wait outside in triple-digit heat.

Journalists were “intimidating” people, the marshal explained, as a CNN correspondent put it. video recording of the eviction.

More than headlines or public fascination is at stake. Definitive answers about the shooting could lead to criminal charges, guide future law enforcement responses to mass shootings, and could reassure the families of the victims.

But at the moment it is often difficult to take a picture.

“I would in no way compare this to reporting under an authoritarian regime,” said Chan, editor of the Texas Tribune. But the roadblocks to information erected by city and state officials, he said, “should trouble anyone who cares about the role of the free press in our democracy.”

Silvia Foster-Frau contributed to this report.

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The Guardian’s view on diversity in the arts: Continuity matters | Editorial https://maxkol.org/the-guardians-view-on-diversity-in-the-arts-continuity-matters-editorial/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 16:38:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-guardians-view-on-diversity-in-the-arts-continuity-matters-editorial/ Jhe reopening of London’s historic Africa Center in new premises south of the Thames is welcome news for those who remember its glory days in Covent Garden, when it became a home for political dissidents such as Desmond Tutu and Thabo Mbeki. But times change and generations pass. The design and decoration of the new […]]]>

Jhe reopening of London’s historic Africa Center in new premises south of the Thames is welcome news for those who remember its glory days in Covent Garden, when it became a home for political dissidents such as Desmond Tutu and Thabo Mbeki. But times change and generations pass. The design and decoration of the new center rightly challenges the idea of ​​a monolithic Africa, with nods to Tanzania, Ghana and the Eritrean Italianate culture of its architect, Jonathan Hagos.

Whether it will thrive in its new location, only time will tell. The part of Southwark it’s in isn’t central, like Covent Garden, or a community center, like Brixton or Tottenham, both of which have their own, less flashy, black-run cultural centers. Brixton’s 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning – which is on Railton Road, the front line of the 1981 riots, and currently features the art of a hero of that era, Pearl Alcock – was founded in 1988. The center Tottenham’s artistic Bernie Grant was purpose-built. in 2007 as a multidisciplinary home for black arts.

For these established venues, struggling to make up for the losses of the pandemic, this is an anxiety-provoking time, coming at the time of the Canada Council’s funding cycle when the sector is waiting to hear which organizations have been accepted as National Portfolio Organizations (NPO s), providing them with financial security for the next three years. The Bernie Grant Center has not yet obtained NPO status, while 198CAL will reapply as part of a consortium with local photography center Photofusion.

The problem these places face is two-fold: while ticking all the boxes of growing diversity and working with young people, the unemployed and people with disabilities, they now find themselves competing with newer, more high-profile initiatives. Simultaneously, the Arts Council’s upgrade program, which aims to spread the money more widely beyond the capital, has redefined the nature of diversity, putting them one-on-one with places in other parts of the country.

While few would argue that it is wrong in principle to try to spread the money beyond the capital, in the realm of ethnic minority culture the equation is complicated. Diverse communities tend to cluster in big cities, and there is little point in pouring money into initiatives in areas where there is no population to support them.

The scarcity of strong, empowered Black and Asian leadership is another issue, with an Arts Council report last week revealing that across all nonprofit-funded organizations in 2020-21, 9% of managers were ethnic. black, Asian and ethnically diverse (compared to 21% of artists). Without this leadership, there is a danger of blitzkrieg initiatives, which never have a chance to take root and establish new visions of what a truly representative culture should look like in the 21st century.

The recent awarding of City of Culture status to Coventry and Bradford – two cities with strong personalities and well-established diverse populations – is a positive step, but one year of supercharged culture is not enough. The now-running eight-year-old Bradford Asian Literature Festival is among organizations waiting with fingers crossed to see if it will win its second NPO bid. Like so many others, she has emerged beaten but rebellious from the pandemic and needs support.

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Return of the photo contest Take your acorn on vacation https://maxkol.org/return-of-the-photo-contest-take-your-acorn-on-vacation/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:12:46 +0000 https://maxkol.org/return-of-the-photo-contest-take-your-acorn-on-vacation/ Undaunted in the face of a 50% increase in airfares due to soaring fuel prices and personnel issues, courageous Glans travelers speak volumes and still hit the tarmac for the promise of a great summer getaway in the US and abroad. RV drivers seem unfazed. Even with the cost of gasoline at an all-time high, […]]]>

Undaunted in the face of a 50% increase in airfares due to soaring fuel prices and personnel issues, courageous Glans travelers speak volumes and still hit the tarmac for the promise of a great summer getaway in the US and abroad.

RV drivers seem unfazed. Even with the cost of gasoline at an all-time high, parking spots at Emma Wood, Point Mugu, Faria, Thornhill Broome and other southern Ventura County beaches are filling up with vacationing RV families, even as we speak. The gas bill won’t be pretty, but the views certainly are.

With COVID testing and travel restrictions eased for the first time since 2019, residents are ready to hit the road, and who can blame them?

Pandemic cabin fever has given way to wanderlust.

In 2020 and 2021, Acorn Newspapers were keen to acknowledge that people simply couldn’t travel because of the pandemic. But our popular Take Your Acorn On Vacation photo contest hasn’t been completely abandoned. We repurposed it as a Take Your Acorn on Staycation contest, though the submissions were admittedly light. The holiday mood had, after all, turned gloomy.

Do you remember all those walks around the neighborhood or the time spent in the garden? Unable to hit the beaches of Maui or the cafes of Paris, our intrepid vacationers found solace at home instead. But this year is different, and families are once again traveling to beaches, parks, mountains and other popular summer destinations with children.

And with those ridiculously high-tech cameras in our pockets, who doesn’t take a million photos and shoot hours of video to capture those moments of joy, wonder, and good old family fun?

Acorn Diaries, following a tradition of over 40 years, invites you once again to share your vacation photos with readers in the community. The top 10 photos selected by our staff are posted online for public voting. Cash prizes will be awarded to first, second and third place finishers, as determined in a final reader poll.

Competition in the vacation photo contest is fierce. We’re looking for spectacular locations, creative settings and, most importantly, the smiling faces of readers holding their Glans high log.

Remember we need high resolution photos and be sure to include your name, phone number and address. Also include a few lines about who the people in the photo are, where exactly they are, and what they are doing.

Holidays are an exciting time and even more fun when you can share the experience. There is a world to explore and this summer is the perfect time to capture the moment.

So grab those bucks, pack that suitcase, and tuck in a Moopark Acorn on the inside. Send your photo to vacation@theacorn.com.

Maybe we’ll even see you on the road.

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Burnley’s Nick Pope seals move to Newcastle United https://maxkol.org/burnleys-nick-pope-seals-move-to-newcastle-united/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:22:45 +0000 https://maxkol.org/burnleys-nick-pope-seals-move-to-newcastle-united/ The 30-year-old is leaving for an undisclosed fee, believed to be £12million. Pope was expected to remain in the Premier League in a World Cup year, following relegation from the Clarets in May, and had been linked with a series of clubs over the summer including West Ham and promoted duo Fulham and NottinghamForest. A […]]]>

The 30-year-old is leaving for an undisclosed fee, believed to be £12million.

Pope was expected to remain in the Premier League in a World Cup year, following relegation from the Clarets in May, and had been linked with a series of clubs over the summer including West Ham and promoted duo Fulham and NottinghamForest.

A club statement said: “The club would like to thank Nick for all his hard work during his time at Turf Moor and wish him all the best for the future.”

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Burnley’s England goalkeeper Nick Pope applauds at the end of the English Premier League soccer match between Aston Villa and Burnley at Villa Park in Birmingham, central England on May 19, 2022. – RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or “live” services. Online use in match limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No video emulation. Social media in-match use limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No use in betting publications, games or single club/league/player publications. (Photo by Geoff Caddick / AFP) / EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or “live” services. Online use in match limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No video emulation. Social media in-match use limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No use in betting publications, games or single club/league/player publications. / EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or “live” services. Online use in match limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No video emulation. Social media in-match use limited to 120 images. 40 additional images can be used in overtime. No use in betting publications, games or single club/league/player publications. (Photo by GEOFF CADDICK/AFP via Getty Images)

Pope joined Burnley six years ago as the Clarets prepared to return to the Premier League after winning the Championship, ironically sealing the title with a 3-0 win at the Valley with Pope in opposition.

After spending his first season developing under Tom Heaton and then Paul Robinson, he replaced injured Heaton in September 2017 and played the rest of that season as Burnley finished seventh and qualified for the Europa League.

He also earned his first England cap against Costa Rica at Leeds and went to Russia 2018 in Gareth Southgate’s side.

Like Heaton, Pope then dislocated his shoulder early in the first leg of the Europa League qualifiers in Aberdeen, returning to the FA Cup in January but not making a Premier League appearance that season.

Heaton was sold to Aston Villa in August 2019, after Pope signed a new contract until 2023, and Pope missed just eight Premier League games in the following three seasons with a knee problem preventing him to participate in Euro 2020 last summer.

Pope made 155 appearances for the club.

Vincent Kompany is said to still be at his disposal Wayne Hennessey and Bailey Peacock-Farrell, number ones for Wales and Northern Ireland, while he has also been linked to Manchester City’s 23-year-old Kosovar goalkeeper Arijanet Muric, who spent last season on loan. in Turkey at Adana Demirspor.

And Kompany is believed to want his new team to strengthen from the back, requiring centre-backs and a goalkeeper with good feet – Pope’s distribution being his only real weak point.

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Action needed to curb sexploitation https://maxkol.org/action-needed-to-curb-sexploitation/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/action-needed-to-curb-sexploitation/ The growing need to govern the content provided by social media companies has hit a Pilot Mound family devastatingly. Daniel Lints, 17, committed suicide after being blackmailed. Global sextortion targets teens Derek Lints wipes away tears as he talks about his 17-year-old son Daniel at his home in Pilot Mound, Man., on Wednesday. Daniel Lints […]]]>



The growing need to govern the content provided by social media companies has hit a Pilot Mound family devastatingly. Daniel Lints, 17, committed suicide after being blackmailed.

Global sextortion targets teens

Derek Lints wipes away tears as he talks about his 17-year-old son Daniel at his home in Pilot Mound, Man., on Wednesday. Daniel Lints was sexually exploited online in February and committed suicide as a result. “/>
JOHN WOODS/THE CANADIAN PRESS Derek Lints wipes away tears as he talks about his son Daniel, 17, at his home in Pilot Mound, Man., on Wednesday. Daniel Lints was sexually exploited online in February and committed suicide as a result.

Job : 10:23 am 19 June 2022

PILOT MOUND, Man. – Daniel Lints was kind and responsible with a witty sense of humor. The rural Manitoba teenager had a bright future and a loving family. He played hockey and constantly visited the nearby community pool.

He was a normal, happy 17-year-old until one cold February day he accepted a message request from what appeared to be an attractive young woman on Snapchat.

Read the full story

The Lints family is sharing Daniel’s story to alert the public to a burgeoning global program targeting teens. The exploitation began when Daniel accepted a message request on Snapchat from what appeared to be a young woman who then asked him to send an explicit image of himself. This set the trap, and within minutes Daniel was told that his private image would be shared with his family and friends unless he paid more money than he had.

The whole situation – from first contact to Daniel’s decision that he couldn’t live with the imagined shame that his intimate image was widely seen – happened in just three hours.

Tragically, this dastardly ploy has been attempted more than ever in the past two years as pandemic restrictions on in-person activities have forced more people to resort to online relationships. The RCMP Child Exploitation Center recorded 52,306 complaints for the 2020-2021 year, a 510% increase from seven years earlier.

The misuse of explicit images for criminal purposes is nothing new, but this sordid new twist appears to be targeting young men. The bait is a convincing image of a young woman to initiate a fake relationship online and request an intimate photo of the victim, taking advantage of the immature impulsiveness that is a developmental stage for some teenagers.




<p>JOHN WOODS / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES</p>
<p>Jill and Derek Lints hold a photo of their son Daniel.</p>
<p>” width=”1412″ height=”2048″ srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP511933_web_JGW124_2022061915-CPT637912337570838268.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600 *600/NEP511933_web_JGW124_2022061915-CPT637912337570838268.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP511933_web_JGW124_2022061915-CPT63791233767083>70w”70w”<figcaption>
<p>JOHN WOODS / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES</p>
<p>Jill and Derek Lints hold a photo of their son Daniel.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>Sextortion’s legacy of ruined reputations, and even lost young lives in some cases, has prompted governments to frequently ask governments to force Big Tech companies to monitor online content more diligently, but that’s not not a simple question.  Countries developing regulations, including Australia and New Zealand, are concerned about the government’s suppression of citizens’ freedom of expression and right to privacy.			</p>
<p>The European Union recently launched a legal initiative to force social media companies to remove the dark side of their online content, which would include sextortion, hate speech and misinformation.  A law passed in April gives regulators the power to hit companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon with billions in fines.			</p>
<p>A problem with such an application is that the online technology operates on a global basis.  While 27 countries have signed up to the EU’s digital rules, predatory online operators can easily operate in countries with little or no moderation and, on the other side of the planet, exploit naïve youngsters in places as farther than Pilot Mound.			</p>
<p>Issues related to online content surveillance were discussed recently in an online forum at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights moderated by Taylor Owen, an associate professor at McGill University in Montreal and an expert in digital media ethics.			</p>
<blockquote class=

While 27 countries have joined the EU’s digital rules, predatory online operators can easily operate in countries with little or no restraint.

He urged Canadians to demand, through our laws, much more transparency in the operation of big tech companies, in the same way that pharmaceutical companies must show their data when developing drugs.

Mr Owen is one of 12 members of an online safety advisory council recently formed by the Canadian government to create a regulatory framework to tackle harmful content online.

To underscore the urgent need for such regulation, council members should be reminded that, even if they deliberate, Canadian teens will continue to receive misleading invitations attached to what appear to be photos of attractive peers, but who are actually the bait used by fraudsters for the sole purpose of exploitation. There must be a required urgency in the council’s efforts.

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HCMC Chief Sends Greetings to News Agencies | National https://maxkol.org/hcmc-chief-sends-greetings-to-news-agencies-national/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:57:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/hcmc-chief-sends-greetings-to-news-agencies-national/ HCMC People’s Committee Chairman Phan Van Mai (2nd, L) visits the Vietnam News Agency (VNA) editorial office in HCMC on the occasion of the 97th anniversary of Vietnam Revolutionary Press Day. (Photo: SGGP) During his visit to the editorial staff of Vietnam News Agency (VNA) in HCMC, chairman of the municipal people’s committee Phan Van […]]]>
HCMC People’s Committee Chairman Phan Van Mai (2nd, L) visits the Vietnam News Agency (VNA) editorial office in HCMC on the occasion of the 97th anniversary of Vietnam Revolutionary Press Day. (Photo: SGGP)

During his visit to the editorial staff of Vietnam News Agency (VNA) in HCMC, chairman of the municipal people’s committee Phan Van Mai expressed his sincere thanks to the newspaper team for their contribution to the construction and development of the southern hub in recent years. years, particularly in the fight against Covid-19.

HCMC Chief Sends Regards to ảnh News Agencies 2 Chairman of People’s Committee of HCMC Phan Van Mai visits Vietnam News Agency (VNA) editorial office in HCMC.

On the same day, the delegation also extended its congratulations to the staff of Thanh Nien and Tuoi Tre newspapers.

The city leader spoke highly of the creativity of the news agencies and their outstanding contribution to the development of the city, especially the propaganda for the Covid-19 pandemic.

HCMC Chief Sends Regards to ảnh News Agencies 3 HCMC People’s Committee Chairman Phan Van Mai sends congratulations to the staff of the newspaper Thanh Nien.

He hopes they will continue to maintain their positions and promptly provide accurate information on issues of concern in various fields as well as establish the truth in the community.

HCMC Chief Sends Regards to ảnh News Agencies 4 HCMC People’s Committee Chairman Phan Van Mai sends greetings to the staff of Tuoi Tre newspaper.

By Mai Hoa – Translated by Kim Khanh

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Prophetic Messenger Wins Another Major Book Award – CSB/SJU https://maxkol.org/prophetic-messenger-wins-another-major-book-award-csb-sju/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:12:27 +0000 https://maxkol.org/prophetic-messenger-wins-another-major-book-award-csb-sju/ Rewards stack up for Kura: prophetic messenger – the book produced in conjunction with the sculpture which became the first permanent installation in the Jon Hassler Sculpture Garden on the grounds of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville. The book, which chronicles the collaborative effort that gave birth to the sculpture, was recently named […]]]>

Rewards stack up for Kura: prophetic messenger – the book produced in conjunction with the sculpture which became the first permanent installation in the Jon Hassler Sculpture Garden on the grounds of Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville.

The book, which chronicles the collaborative effort that gave birth to the sculpture, was recently named Best Book of Fine Art at the 16th National Indie Excellence Awards (NIEA). The awards recognize freelance and independent publishing efforts and are open to “all books in print in English available for sale, including small presses, mid-sized independent publishers, university presses and self-published authors” .

“NIEA is proud to be a champion of self-publishing and small independent presses that go the extra mile to produce books of excellence in every aspect,” reads the organization’s website.

“This special award recognizes the visual sophistication and incredible artistry that went into the production of the Kura: prophetic messenger book project,” said Steven Lemke ’08, Associate Director at The Saint John’s Pottery, Art Department Instructor and Environmental Artist in Residence at SJU. “To see Saint John’s vibrant artistic community recognized and the skilled work of Kura: prophetic messenger editorial and design team in particular is a treasure.”

Last spring, the book, which was first published in October 2021, was also named the winner of the 2022 Nautilus Book Prize in the photography and art division. This competition was international in scope. Past winners include the Dalai Lama, Deepak Chopra MD, Desmond Tutu, Judy Collins, Barry Lopez and Louise Erdrich.

Five major pieces weighing a total of 14,000 pounds form the base of the sculpture, which features a 4,800-pound granite base. This slab was removed from Alcuin’s library when it was connected to the adjacent Learning Commons. Many materials were reused from other iconic structures on the SJU campus.

The word Kura comes from the Japanese term for warehouse, which was historically used to protect food supplies for future use. At the center of the round, a stainless steel Kura hanging from the center of the sculpture is a handmade scroll of the Rule of Saint Benedict assembled by local artist Mary Bruno with a reclaimed redwood scroll and display stand made by the local craftsman Jeff Thompson.

It was installed in the summer of 2020, and was dedicated and blessed in October 2021.

The book was published to coincide with this dedication. Its structure is unique and, like the sculpture itself, a collaboration within the CSB+SJU community and beyond.

It begins with a foreword by Lemke on the importance of Bresnahan’s work in higher liberal arts education. Dr. Matthew Welch, associate director of the Minneapolis Institute of Art, has written an essay on the history and function of traditional Kura warehouses in Japan.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861), Children installing the frame of a warehouse, California. 1842. Color woodcut. Gift of Louis W. Hill Jr., Minneapolis Institute of Art (P.78.64.32A-C). Featured on pages 10-11 of Kura: prophetic messenger book.

The central part of the book is an essay by Bresnahan comprehensively documenting the collaborative process that resulted in the making of the Kura sculpture. It deals with the philosophy of eco-mutualism, a central theme in Bresnahan’s work. Additionally, Bresnahan wrote the opening and closing text of the book and the captions that accompany the more than 250 photographs.

His wife, Colette Bresnahan ’83, composed seed biographies of the “three sisters” (corn, beans, and squash) which are sealed and stored inside the sculpture. Its section describes how these seeds were grown, named, and used across cultures.

Significantly, Richard and Colette’s daughter, Margaret Bresnahan, oversaw the book’s production and served as editor. She structured the book around the four seasons: summer, autumn, winter and spring. She also edited the text of the book and wrote the biographies of the 178 artists associated with Kura sculpture.

The book was designed by Paul Nylander of Illustrada. Paul Wegner ’93 served as photo editor. He was also named a finalist for the 2022 Minnesota Book Awards, which were announced in April.

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Farewell Voisins, harmless viewing of my youth https://maxkol.org/farewell-voisins-harmless-viewing-of-my-youth/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 15:28:45 +0000 https://maxkol.org/farewell-voisins-harmless-viewing-of-my-youth/ But I know there will be many like me, lamenting the end of an era. At its peak in the UK in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Neighbors drew ten million viewers for each episode. Over 20 million people tuned into November 1988 to watch episode 523, when Scott and Charlene (Jason Donovan and […]]]>

But I know there will be many like me, lamenting the end of an era. At its peak in the UK in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Neighbors drew ten million viewers for each episode. Over 20 million people tuned into November 1988 to watch episode 523, when Scott and Charlene (Jason Donovan and Kylie Minogue) got married.

I remember listening to the very first episode two years earlier. A virus of the disease had kept me out of primary school and I watched from the couch with my mother as residents of Ramsay Street deal with the fallout from Des Clarke’s bachelor party (or the night dollars in Australian language). We were hooked.

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From then on, Neighbors became part of my family’s daily routine. We weren’t particularly keen viewers, but from Monday to Friday we got together for the 5.35pm show on BBC1, before having dinner at 6pm. That’s just what we did; it was harmless viewing. And, other than when Harold Bishop was swept out to sea (don’t worry, he came back!), the sun was generally shining.

Handout photo released by Fremantle Australia of the man and guest cast, (front row left to right) Freya Van Dyke, Lucinda Cowden, Scarlett Anderson, John Turner, Ryan Moloney, Ian Smith, Alan Fletcher, Benji McNair, Jackie Woodburne, Zima Anderson, Annie Jones, Harlow Herbison-Fuentes, Melissa Bell, Stefan Dennis, Rebekah Elmaloglou, Kate Kendall, Sally-Anne Upton, (second row left to right) Richard Huggett, April Rose Pengilly, Takaya Honda, Richie Morris , Gemma Bird Matheson, Georgie Stone, Candice Leask, Lloyd Will, Emerald Chan, Jacinta Stapleton, Paul Keane, Charlotte Chimes, Tim Kano, Pheobe Roberts, James Mason, Ben Hall and Matt Wilson, featured in the final scene of Neighbors filmed Friday. Issue date: Friday June 10, 2022. PA Photo. The globally acclaimed soap opera first aired in 1985 and followed the lives of those who live and work in the fictional Melbourne suburb of Erinsborough. See PA story SHOWBIZ Neighbours. Photo credit should read: Ray Messner/Fremantle Australia/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the image may require additional permission from the copyright holder.

As my brother and sisters and I grew up and left home, this routine was inevitably dropped. But I kept watching. The 1:40 p.m. slot was ideal for a newbie sub-editor who didn’t start his shift until 3 p.m.!

A sabbatical year in 2001 with friends – in Australia, of course – was, ironically, when I had to break that habit. Yes, I took pictures with Jarrod ‘Toadfish’ Rebecci at the Neighbors Quiz night at a pub in downtown Sydney and yes, I visited Vermont South on the outskirts of Melbourne to stand in Pin Oak Court (aka Ramsay Street), but I stopped logging in regularly as life got in the way.

Now that I have three children of my own, I wonder how I ever found the time for this. But there, my secret is revealed: I loved Neighbours! And I’ll tune in when the final episode airs on Channel 5 on August 1st. For the love of the good old days.

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Julie Vitkovskaya named associate editor for Visual Enterprise https://maxkol.org/julie-vitkovskaya-named-associate-editor-for-visual-enterprise/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:25:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/julie-vitkovskaya-named-associate-editor-for-visual-enterprise/ Placeholder while loading article actions Announcement from Visual Enterprise Editor-in-Chief Ann Gerhart: I am delighted to announce that Julie Vitkovskaya has been promoted to Editorial Assistant for the Visual Enterprise. She will help direct and edit timely, memorable and touching visual storytelling of the news, a key area of ​​coverage expansion. Julie will partner with […]]]>
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Announcement from Visual Enterprise Editor-in-Chief Ann Gerhart:

I am delighted to announce that Julie Vitkovskaya has been promoted to Editorial Assistant for the Visual Enterprise. She will help direct and edit timely, memorable and touching visual storytelling of the news, a key area of ​​coverage expansion. Julie will partner with me to identify opportunities for fresh visual approaches to news, bring together teams from multiple offices, and offer vision, guidance, and editing as we invent story forms and accelerate their adoption in the newsroom. She will report to the Visual Enterprise Editor and work closely with the Visual Enterprise Editor Collective on Foreign, Climate, Domestic and Business, other editors on Visual Desks and journalists of all skill sets to convene and coordinate coverage, refine workflows and reach new audiences.

Julie is perfectly qualified for this new role, which she has already started. She is brimming with ambitious and inventive ideas to make our story more visually dynamic, and she is an agile collaborator who thrives on teamwork. During her seven years here, she played a vital role in the production of some of The Post’s most important newspapers, creating a variety of new ways for readers to absorb this journalism and acting as a liaison between visual teams and section editors.

As a project writer, she managed and launched two award-winning multi-part and deeply layered series, “The Afghanistan Papers” and “2°C: Beyond the Limit”, proving how well she can organize and referee teams. and drive them to meet deadlines. She produced “George Floyd’s America,” handling photo, video, and graphics, and reported, researched, and produced compelling packages that put human stories front and center, in “10 Lives, Interrupted” and “50 Astronauts, in their own words”.

As Deputy Digital Editor for Foreign and National Security from 2016-2018, she frequently worked with graphics to collaborate on breaking news stories. She kept track of the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia and conducted extensive investigations into what Obama and Trump knew about Russian interference in the 2016 election. She also wrote a weekly dossier on the national security for Apple.

Born in Russia, Julie came to the United States when she was 8 years old. She graduated from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University and spent two years in South Korea working at an English-language newspaper as Princeton in Asia. companion.

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Toru Takahashi, respected AP Asia photo editor, dies at 62 https://maxkol.org/toru-takahashi-respected-ap-asia-photo-editor-dies-at-62/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 10:16:30 +0000 https://maxkol.org/toru-takahashi-respected-ap-asia-photo-editor-dies-at-62/ TOKYO (AP) — Toru Takahashi, a Tokyo-based photo editor and photographer for the Associated Press who spent his long career meticulously capturing images and sharing his knowledge with colleagues, has died. He was 62 years old. Takahashi, who was being treated for lung cancer, died on Friday, just days after returning from hospital, according to […]]]>

TOKYO (AP) — Toru Takahashi, a Tokyo-based photo editor and photographer for the Associated Press who spent his long career meticulously capturing images and sharing his knowledge with colleagues, has died. He was 62 years old.

Takahashi, who was being treated for lung cancer, died on Friday, just days after returning from hospital, according to his wife, Mieko Takahashi.

Originally from Kumamoto in southern Japan, he joined AP in Tokyo as an editorial assistant, running errands for photographers and reporters. He learned English and photography from senior executives, before getting a job editing and shooting photos.

Takahashi was known for his wry sense of humor and constant attention to detail, both on assignments and when preparing photos of his colleagues for publication.

“Toru was the ultimate professional on the (editing) desk, never cutting corners, always telling you where and when you were wrong, but always in a friendly way,” said Mark Baker, AP’s photo editor for the Australia and New Zealand. “He cared about the photo service and he left a legacy in the area of ​​photographers who know how to tone and caption.”

Early in his career, Takahashi asked his then-boss Chikako Yatabe to send him to cover a Formula 1 race in central Japan, saying the AP would not regret it.

“And just as he promised, he turned out to be an excellent photojournalist at various sporting events as well as general news coverage,” Yatabe said.

During his 36-year career at AP, Takahashi covered a series of major overseas events, including Hong Kong’s return to China in 1997 and South Korea’s 2002 presidential election, as well as two Olympic Games. Olympic Games – the Sydney Games in 2000 and the Beijing Games in 2008 – and seven F-1 races, both as an editor and as a photographer.

Yatabe said he inspired many of his colleagues not only with his work ethic, but also with his spirit. “Laughter surrounded him the whole time.”

During a typical editing shift, Takahashi sat hunched over his computer screen at his desk, a beloved chocolate-covered donut and a cup of coffee by his side as he edited hundreds of filed photos. by photographers from AP offices around the world.

He was also a talented photographer.

In 2016, he captured a memorable moment after Panamanian boxer Luis Concepcion defeated Japan’s Kohei Kono in a WBA world super flyweight title fight in Tokyo.

“Concepcion suddenly rushed to the corner of the ring and climbed the ropes,” Takahashi wrote on an AP blog. “I thought he would play with the crowd a bit, so I pointed my camera at him, but then he jumped off the rope and did a back somersault. I didn’t expect him to show such acrobatic jubilation in the ring, but I was lucky enough to capture a frame that shows the contrast between the celebrating champion and his staff standing sideways, almost without emotion.

Takahashi decided to go home instead of staying in the hospital.

“He texted me saying he was going to try to win the battle. And added ‘Home is comfortable.’ “I wasn’t surprised at his mention of home. He often talked about his family, mostly with humor. And love,” said Yirmiyan Arthur, an AP photo editor in South Asia.

Instead of flowers, Takahashi’s children filled his casket with some of his favorite things, including horse racing brochures, movies, baseball and boxing photos, as well as the camera bag and shoes he used on reporting trips.

They also performed Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and the theme song to his favorite samurai drama, his wife said.

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