Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Mon, 27 Sep 2021 14:55:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 Social media apps exploit self-esteem issues https://maxkol.org/social-media-apps-exploit-self-esteem-issues/ https://maxkol.org/social-media-apps-exploit-self-esteem-issues/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/social-media-apps-exploit-self-esteem-issues/ Editorial If Instagram came with a security warning, what would it look like? Warning: the people on this app are less perfect than they appear. The popular photo-sharing app became a trending topic last week after a the Wall Street newspaper The investigation found that Facebook, which owns Instagram, not only knows that its app […]]]>

Editorial



If Instagram came with a security warning, what would it look like? Warning: the people on this app are less perfect than they appear.

The popular photo-sharing app became a trending topic last week after a the Wall Street newspaper The investigation found that Facebook, which owns Instagram, not only knows that its app is toxic to teenage girls, but in fact has come to this conclusion based on its own internal research.

According to an internal Facebook presentation reviewed by the Newspaper, 32% of teenage girls said Instagram makes them feel bad about their bodies when they feel bad. Over 40% of Instagram users are under 22, and 22 million teens log onto Instagram every day. (You must be at least 13 years old to use Instagram.)

“Teens blame Instagram for increasing rates of anxiety and depression,” reads another slide in the internal presentation. “This reaction was spontaneous and consistent across all groups.”

Instagram’s story is part of a Newspaper investigation, which also examined other failures of Facebook. And yet, despite these findings, Facebook seems to hate doing anything with them. In fact, the Newspaper found that the company continues to publicly downplay Instagram’s negative effects on teens.

History has renewed calls for tighter regulations on social media, as well as removing a proposed kid-friendly version of Instagram, which seems like a terrible idea from all angles. But increased regulation, or even treating the app like tobacco or alcohol, is unlikely to be enough to convince teenage girls to take down Instagram. For many of its more ardent users, the app is too ingrained in their lives.

Instagram is an ambitious photo app and photo app. Instagram’s ambitious qualities have spawned both the influencer industry – now a multi-billion dollar concern – as well as a phenomenon called Instagram Face, in which women use filters – or, in some cases, undergo full plastic surgery – to achieve the contoured appearance of pillow lips that a New York Times the writer called it “sexy babe meets Jessica Rabbit”.

Users offer each other validation via heart-shaped “likes”; it is an economy of attention based on appearance. It’s not hard to see how self-esteem can become entangled in all of this, especially since content created by young people is often forward-looking. They take selfies. They present Reels, Instagram’s shareable short videos. They are the content.

Even the idea of ​​a “personal brand” gives the impression that one has to be a marketable entity. It’s no wonder that many young people place a disproportionate importance on followers, engagement, shares and likes over their worth as a human being. It is also interesting to note that these young people grew up on the Internet; depending on how connected their parents are, some may even have had digital fingerprints before they were born.

Instagram boss Adam Mosseri argued on a WSJ podcast that social comparison and anxiety are social issues, not Instagram-specific issues. And he’s right, these are social issues that predate Instagram and the internet. Before Instagram, fashion magazines were the architects of unrealistic beauty standards. Before that, it was probably something else. But there is one crucial difference: the models were generally not his peers. It wasn’t, except in the rarest of cases, a pouting friend from the cover of a glossy magazine.

Mr Mosseri said he was keen to make sure Instagram “does not exacerbate these problems”. A first step might be to admit, publicly, that he has already done so.


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Pakistan Completely Isolated on the Global Stage – The New Indian Express https://maxkol.org/pakistan-completely-isolated-on-the-global-stage-the-new-indian-express/ https://maxkol.org/pakistan-completely-isolated-on-the-global-stage-the-new-indian-express/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 01:13:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/pakistan-completely-isolated-on-the-global-stage-the-new-indian-express/ One of the greatest lessons of Indian foreign policy at the United Nations General Assembly meeting has been Pakistan’s complete isolation on the world stage. For a very long time, Pakistan gladly acted as a buffer for the West to restrict the regional ambitions of India and the USSR. The Great Game is finally over, […]]]>

One of the greatest lessons of Indian foreign policy at the United Nations General Assembly meeting has been Pakistan’s complete isolation on the world stage. For a very long time, Pakistan gladly acted as a buffer for the West to restrict the regional ambitions of India and the USSR. The Great Game is finally over, leaving Islamabad to face the terrorist demons it has stirred up. The highest US dollar he embezzled to fund his global jihad project has dried up and left the country to fight the shortage on its own.

If the Biden administration had any interest in keeping Islamabad afloat with help to encourage an orderly transfer of power in Afghanistan, it evaporated with the installation of the Taliban regime and the seizure of power by the Haqqani network in Kabul aided by the deep state of Pakistan, pushing the relatively moderate Mullah Baradar out of the way. India has played its part in building the narrative over the years by highlighting the neighbor’s use of terror as an instrument of state policy. New Delhi’s bitter retaliation to Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan scouring Kashmir at the UNGA meeting, using the right of reply, calling him an arsonist in firefighter disguise eloquently captured the duplicity.

US Vice President Kamala Harris herself touched on Pakistan’s terrorist sanctuary during her one-on-one with Prime Minister Narendra Modi, indicating the change in mood in Washington. That Modi had a summit meeting with President Biden outside of his participation in the multilateral Quad summit must have been infuriating for the Islamabad army and its puppet prime minister. Especially since Biden hasn’t even spoken to Imran since returning to the White House, not even at the height of the Afghan crisis. Given the diplomatic slap, Imran opted to address the UNGA through a pre-recorded speech instead of an in-person visit. He naively wondered in his speech why his nation was not in the aid basket, when the global community is committed to supporting Afghan civil society.

That Pakistan is no longer clubbed with India is old news; he is now linked to the brutal Taliban regime he incubated. How that would manifest in Kashmir and elsewhere as the nation deals with the domestic fallout from declining foreign aid and the FATF, the watchdog of terrorist financing, remains to be seen.


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Editorial: Instagram is not a place for children | Chroniclers https://maxkol.org/editorial-instagram-is-not-a-place-for-children-chroniclers/ https://maxkol.org/editorial-instagram-is-not-a-place-for-children-chroniclers/#respond Sun, 26 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/editorial-instagram-is-not-a-place-for-children-chroniclers/ Unfortunately, all of this thoughtful thinking has produced an inconsistent result. In the same post in which Facebook announced the changes, he also conceded that he was moving forward with a new version of Instagram aimed at children under 13. Dubbed Instagram Youth, the concept was so blatantly obnoxious that it garnered opprobrium from health […]]]>

Unfortunately, all of this thoughtful thinking has produced an inconsistent result. In the same post in which Facebook announced the changes, he also conceded that he was moving forward with a new version of Instagram aimed at children under 13. Dubbed Instagram Youth, the concept was so blatantly obnoxious that it garnered opprobrium from health experts and consumer advocates, lawmakers on both sides and nearly every state attorney general across the country.

A letter from health experts could hardly have been more brutal. “The platform’s focus on appearance, self-presentation and branding presents challenges for the privacy and well-being of adolescents,” he said. “Younger children are even less developmentally equipped to face these challenges as they learn to navigate social interactions, friendships and their inner sense of strengths and challenges during this crucial window of development. . “

Facebook justifies this plan with the (rather shameless) theory that since it has largely failed to prevent children from accessing adult Instagram, the children’s version “will reduce the incentive for people under 13 to lie. on their age ”.

One could attribute all of this to Facebook’s lack of standard tact. Yet the company’s treatment of young people has been particularly irresponsible. For years, he refused to make changes that would prevent kids from racking up credit card bills on his platform. In 2016, she started paying young people – including minors – $ 20 per month to use an app that gave the company full access to their web and phone activity. Its Messenger Kids app is aimed at users as young as 6, although experts have warned that it is very likely to “undermine healthy development in children.” That these schemes continue to go wrong does not seem to be much of a deterrent.


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Editorial – A legacy lives on: Tyler Christman is remembered for enjoying his life to the fullest | Editorials https://maxkol.org/editorial-a-legacy-lives-on-tyler-christman-is-remembered-for-enjoying-his-life-to-the-fullest-editorials/ https://maxkol.org/editorial-a-legacy-lives-on-tyler-christman-is-remembered-for-enjoying-his-life-to-the-fullest-editorials/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/editorial-a-legacy-lives-on-tyler-christman-is-remembered-for-enjoying-his-life-to-the-fullest-editorials/ At 14, Tyler Christman had his whole life ahead of him. Family members said he was free-spirited and adventurous. He enjoyed competing on Saturdays at Evans Mills Raceway, previously owned by his father, Jason. A freshman at Carthage High School, Tyler played on the college junior football team. Like everything he has done, he gave […]]]>

At 14, Tyler Christman had his whole life ahead of him.

Family members said he was free-spirited and adventurous. He enjoyed competing on Saturdays at Evans Mills Raceway, previously owned by his father, Jason.

A freshman at Carthage High School, Tyler played on the college junior football team. Like everything he has done, he gave everything to his teammates as well as to the school and his fans.

Tragically, Tyler suffered a serious head injury on September 18 during a football game against West Genesee High School in Camillus. He collapsed and had to be taken to the Syracuse Northern State University Hospital.

People in upstate New York have contacted Tyler’s family. A “Light It Up Red for Tyler” rally was held Monday evening at the village park in Carthage. Hailey Reece, one of Tyler’s close friends, has asked people on Facebook to wear red in support.

“It worked. The suggestion quickly spread far beyond village, school district, northern and New York state boundaries,” according to an article published Monday by the Watertown Daily. Times. “Carthage and Augustinian Central Academy students locally and in northern districts of the country flocked to classrooms decked out in whatever red costume they could find. Prayer lines s ‘spreading across the country quickly formed on social media Monday and comet red shirts worn in solidarity appeared in schools, businesses and everywhere on social media in places near and far: the center and the west. from New York; along the east coast to North Carolina, Maryland and Florida; to California and through Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Texas and Michigan in between. Photo after photo, post after post, we see teams, businesses and entire families clad in red, reaching out in the face of tragedy. Number 27, Tyler’s number, even appeared on ribbons attached to backpacks.

But the worst fears for the Christman family have come true. Despite brain surgery performed on him following his injury, Tyler remained unconscious. He died Tuesday afternoon surrounded by his relatives.

There is no doubt that Tyler’s family and friends were deeply touched by the massive display of support. So many people in the north of the country felt like they had lost one of their own.

Tyler’s father posted a statement Tuesday on Facebook, in part: “Our family has felt such love from family, friends, co-workers, neighbors and strangers. Our family appreciates all the thoughts, prayers and support. We know he felt all the love that was sent to him. Our Tyler was and always will be loved.

Support from community members continues. Lee Gill, owner of Evans Mills Speedway, has scheduled a candlelight vigil in Tyler’s honor to be held at 7 p.m. tonight at the race site. And the Watertown Red & Black, a local semi-pro football team, will be wearing stickers with Tyler’s number 27 on their helmets for future games.

Members of Tyler’s family took part in a march of honor on Tuesday. It is a ceremony to commemorate an individual’s life before their organs are harvested after death and donated to other people.

We congratulate everyone who sent their support to the Christman family. It is devastating to lose someone so loved at such a young age. But Tyler’s family will build on the strength offered by the community at large.

We also congratulate the Christmans on their decision to pass Tyler’s organs to those who need them. No one wants to have to make such a decision for a loved one.

But there are many people waiting for vital organs, and allowing those people to continue is a noble act. Tyler’s memory will last throughout the lives he helps preserve.

It is important that people have difficult but important conversations with their family members about end-of-life issues. Adults should make sure that plans are made for themselves, their partners and, if necessary, their children.

The Health Resources and Services Administration, part of the US Department of Health and Human Services, maintains a website with information about the need and process for organ donation. Visit http://wdt.me/m39tgg to learn more.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn Qualifying Purchases.


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The community has relied on The Times for 157 years | News, Sports, Jobs https://maxkol.org/the-community-has-relied-on-the-times-for-157-years-news-sports-jobs/ https://maxkol.org/the-community-has-relied-on-the-times-for-157-years-news-sports-jobs/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:01:04 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-community-has-relied-on-the-times-for-157-years-news-sports-jobs/ 157 years ago yesterday, a man named Walter Hood started a new business in Marietta. The first, number one, volume of The Marietta Times came off the press with little fanfare, but would go on to become one of Marietta’s oldest endeavors. My association with the newspaper would launch a “some” years later, but over […]]]>

157 years ago yesterday, a man named Walter Hood started a new business in Marietta.

The first, number one, volume of The Marietta Times came off the press with little fanfare, but would go on to become one of Marietta’s oldest endeavors. My association with the newspaper would launch a “some” years later, but over the years, I’ve been keen to look at some of the older editions we’ve printed.

The Times was a weekly until 1898, so approximately 1,768 editions were printed during that edition. It then became a daily newspaper, normally printed from Monday to Saturday. There was a time in the early 1900s when we also printed a Sunday edition. For some time after the daily began, the weekly continued to be printed. In total, we have printed over 40,000 editions.

Newspapers are a unique form of manufacturing. Every day we start over with a new product, collect the news, write the stories, design the pages, print the newspaper, and then distribute throughout the region. We have done it 40,000 times in 157 years. Unbelievable.

The Times was originally printed on Front Street, near where the Salvation Army is now located. The floods pushed them towards the slightly higher ground of Putnam Street where the newspaper used a building in the middle of block 200 which still bears our name at the top of the facade. They tried to move to 508 Putnam, but when that didn’t work, the owners bought land near Glendale Road and built the building at 700 Channel Lane where The Times started printing in the early 1970s.

This is where my association started in 1977. Honestly, I thought a high school student with very little photography experience could walk into a newspaper and apply for a job as a photographer. Well it worked, and here I am. And here we are, printing a newspaper every day for generations.

Have things changed a lot? Yes, and thank goodness. Pulling out a newspaper is difficult. Before, it was even harder. Until the adoption of offset printing 50 years ago, the newspaper was cast in molten metal every day. The photographs were chemically etched onto metal. It sounds horrible and it probably was.

Things were a little better when I started, but it was still difficult. Journalists wrote articles on typewriters, then used a giant scanner to send the article to a typographer that could only output a certain width. The photos were all black and white as we had no way to separate the colors. When we finally got the equipment to do it, it was a 13-step process that took two hours per photo. When we made a photo page after Marietta College won the World Series, it took all night for the photos to be ready. National photos were transmitted over a dedicated phone line, which took 10 minutes for a black and white photo and 30 minutes for a color photo.

Technology has greatly simplified things and allows us to better serve our readers through website, app and electronic publishing no matter where you are located.

Have we always been right, well no, we have made mistakes time and time again. We erroneously predicted the flood level of over 12 feet in 1913. We put the assassination of President Lincoln on page two in 1865.

Dig deep enough through 40,000 editions and I’m sure you could find hundreds more. Some of which I’m sure I did – in fact, I know I did. Anyone who works in a newspaper knows that they made a mistake in the newspaper along with the whole city, when they read it in the clarity of a new day.

Of course, there is now social media, where Keyboard Warriors can report errors on their Facebook pages. Maybe there was a typo, or maybe we didn’t cover something we should have. Once last year, a community member encouraged people to stop supporting the newspaper because we hadn’t covered something that we probably should have had and it was something that was close to his heart.

Over 40,000 editions, 157 years, I doubt this is the first time anyone has flamed for something that was or was not in the newspaper, I doubt it will be the last.

It is important that as a community we support the newspaper. Many small towns have lost their newspapers, many much larger towns for that matter are no longer served by newspapers, creating information deserts where there is no one to cover the issues facing the public. The global pandemic has been tough on retail, including retail in Marietta. When the retail industry suffers, the businesses that serve it, including newspapers, also suffer.

People need their local newspaper, which is why we continue to work hard to provide it every day. A Facebook user recently complained about the cost of a subscription. For about the cost of a Pumpkin Spice Ice Capp per week, we print a newspaper, drive to your house, then have it and hundreds of other issues available to you on your smartphone, tablet or your computer. Seems like a good deal to me.

Feed your brain, read a newspaper.

Art Smith is the Times’ online manager, he can be reached at

asmith@mariettatimes.com

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Texas GOP bow to Big Lie with election audit https://maxkol.org/texas-gop-bow-to-big-lie-with-election-audit/ https://maxkol.org/texas-gop-bow-to-big-lie-with-election-audit/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 19:44:37 +0000 https://maxkol.org/texas-gop-bow-to-big-lie-with-election-audit/ The big lie of widespread voter fraud – and the lie that former President Donald Trump won the 2020 election – took root in Texas late Thursday night. This is a worrying sign for the elections of 2022 and 2024. Believers in democracy are taking note. Hours after the twice impeached former president publicly called […]]]>

The big lie of widespread voter fraud – and the lie that former President Donald Trump won the 2020 election – took root in Texas late Thursday night.

This is a worrying sign for the elections of 2022 and 2024. Believers in democracy are taking note.

Hours after the twice impeached former president publicly called on Gov. Greg Abbott to back legislation for a “2020 election forensic audit,” the Texas secretary of state’s office suddenly announced a “full forensic audit” of the results of four of the largest counties.

It doesn’t matter that Texas is currently without a secretary of state. Try to forget that the last Secretary of State, Ruth Ruggero Hughs, appointed by Abbott, told lawmakers last spring that the 2020 election was “simple and safe.”

Ignore that Republicans won the poll from the top down in 2020 and Trump prevailed in Texas by a 5.6 point margin.

What matters is that Trump wants an audit, and now Texas Republicans are bowing to his will, sparing taxpayers no expense to give him what he wants.

The ghost of the secretary of state’s office – it has not yet been mentioned who released the ad – said four counties in Texas – Collin, Dallas, Harris and Tarrant – would be audited. President Joe Biden won all of these except Collin.

Because Trump won Texas, the audit will do nothing to change the electoral college tally or the results of a national election that President Joe Biden won by more than 7 million votes.

There have been presidential candidates and incumbent presidents who have lost smaller elections than Trump, but who have not whined and sulked. We wish we could say the Republicans in Texas are giving Trump his audit like it’s a cookie to appease an upset child, but what they’re doing is more insidious and threatening to democracy.

By casting doubt on the 2020 presidential election, Texas Republicans such as Abbott, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and indicted Attorney General Ken Paxton are harvesting mistrust for the 2022 and 2024 elections, if Democrats are successful. In his letter, Trump says that the issues “will affect 2022 and 2024”.

Trump’s lie that he was removed from office has been rebuked by more than 80 judges, many of whom have been appointed by him. His Justice Department found no evidence of electoral fraud.

On the same day that Texas announced the audits, it was reported that the nearly six-month audit of Arizona’s vote was over and reaffirmed Biden’s victory. In fact, the audit widened Biden’s margin of victory.

Trump’s intimidation of Abbott in the letter, demanding that the governor “act now” and that it “must be done this week,” underscores Abbott’s political cowardice. What kind of governor, what kind of leader, allows an ordinary citizen living in another state to dictate an action so potentially harmful to faith in democracy?

Abbott, always quick with a tweet or a photoshoot, was silent in response to Trump’s letter as well as the announcement made by the Secretary of State’s office.

Those who believe in democracy should be on the alert. As political scientists Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt noted in their book “How Democracies Die”: “When societies divide into partisan camps with profoundly different worldviews, and when these differences are seen as existential and irreconcilable, the Political rivalry can escalate into partisan hatred. Parties come to see themselves not as legitimate rivals, but as dangerous enemies. Losing ceases to be an accepted part of the political process and instead becomes a disaster. “

An audit of the 2020 elections is absurd, but it also sets a dangerous precedent for 2022 and 2024. It is a shame.


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Newsom must ensure that media teams can cover protests https://maxkol.org/newsom-must-ensure-that-media-teams-can-cover-protests/ https://maxkol.org/newsom-must-ensure-that-media-teams-can-cover-protests/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:14:44 +0000 https://maxkol.org/newsom-must-ensure-that-media-teams-can-cover-protests/ Readers of the Democratic press often comment on Kent Porter’s sensational work, especially his photos of raging forest fires and brave firefighters battling the blazes. Covering fires requires skill and experience, courage and access. California law allows authorities to shut down areas affected by disasters for public safety. However, the law states that “nothing in […]]]>

Readers of the Democratic press often comment on Kent Porter’s sensational work, especially his photos of raging forest fires and brave firefighters battling the blazes. Covering fires requires skill and experience, courage and access.

California law allows authorities to shut down areas affected by disasters for public safety. However, the law states that “nothing in this article shall prevent a duly authorized representative of a news service, newspaper, radio or television station or network from entering areas closed under this article ”.

Sometimes the police forget this last provision – Article 409.5 (d) of the Penal Code – or perhaps that it was left out of their training. Porter met one of these officers two weeks ago on his way to cover the Hopkins fire, which destroyed 30 homes near Ukiah.

“He was adamant,” Porter later said in a Facebook post. “I was reluctant to pull the 409.5 card on him, he seemed like a pretty nice guy. Once I quoted the law, he reluctantly let me pass, but he also said, if you oppose the fire department, “I will arrest you.” “

Porter concluded with some great advice: “Don’t give up your rights as a journalist, claim the truth, ask a ton of questions and be adamant that you have the legal right to document disasters so that others can. see them. “

That is why the law was promulgated. Reporters, photographers and videographers are the eyes and ears of the public. Their on-site accounts help people understand the scale of flooding, earthquakes, explosions and fires, like the one outside Ukiah and those currently burning near Lake Tahoe and Sequoia National Park. .

A bill from State Senator Mike McGuire, D-Healdsburg, awaiting action on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk would guarantee journalists equal access to protests and protests.

There have been too many cases in which overzealous law enforcement officials at protests have taken it upon themselves to interfere with media coverage and even arrest journalists and photographers doing their jobs.

Journalists have been arrested, pepper sprayed and shot with rubber bullets by officers during Black Lives Matter protests in California and many other states last year. In some cases, authorities appeared to specifically target press teams.

Fortunately, such incidents are not common. But whenever something like this happens, the public is denied frontline reporting on a public event and the police response to it. Imagine the attempts by supporters and protesters to fill the information void if news crews were denied access to the U.S. Capitol during the January 6 riot.

McGuire’s bill, SB 98, would allow California journalists to stay in areas that police have ordered cleared of protesters. Reaffirming existing law, the McGuire Bill also allows journalists to work near police command posts. And he says detained journalists have the right to immediately contact a monitoring officer to challenge their detention.

A nearly identical bill, also from McGuire, was passed last year. Newsom vetoed it, expressing fears that “marginal groups” could gain access to cordoned off areas pretending to be journalists. The new draft law, like the disaster area law, clearly applies to “duly authorized representatives” of media outlets. This should allow the authorities to repel intruders.

Demonstration is a fundamental right, guaranteed by the First Amendment. The same goes for reporting. By signing SB 98, Newsom can ensure journalists are able to do their jobs and protect the public’s right to know.

You can send letters to the editor for letters@pressdemocrat.com.


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Rampant surveillance state of New York https://maxkol.org/rampant-surveillance-state-of-new-york/ https://maxkol.org/rampant-surveillance-state-of-new-york/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 09:06:23 +0000 https://maxkol.org/rampant-surveillance-state-of-new-york/ The protection of people in road construction areas is certainly a valid public concern. The same is true of finding ways to generate new revenue for the government so that taxes do not have to increase. But these benefits come at a price of their own: the further erosion of privacy. Targeting one public good […]]]>

The protection of people in road construction areas is certainly a valid public concern. The same is true of finding ways to generate new revenue for the government so that taxes do not have to increase. But these benefits come at a price of their own: the further erosion of privacy.

Targeting one public good or another, these intrusions may appear to be worth the limited cost to our privacy in a particular location or under specific circumstances. Cumulatively, however, they threaten to become so ubiquitous over time that there may be few or no places where certain aspects of our lives go unattended.

This, it seems, requires a much broader discussion than debating these issues one at a time in a vacuum.

The state’s latest move of surveillance came on Labor Day when Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a law to establish a pilot photographic surveillance program for road construction areas.

The argument in their favor seems pretty strong. As the memo notes, New York recorded 3,450 accidents in work zones on state highways between 2010 and 2016, killing 50 and injuring more than 1,100 among drivers and workers. Maryland, one of many states to implement speed cameras in work areas, has seen a 59% decrease in speeding, a 39% reduction in disabling injuries and a 45% reduction in fatalities. .

State officials, employee unions and contractors had urged New York to allow speed cameras in work areas, similar to those already in place in communities like Albany, which have set them up at certain intersections to discourage people go through red lights.

A good cause, certainly, but where does it end? If speed cameras can save lives in construction areas, why not put them on all roads, so that no driver can ever accelerate and get away? It’s efficient, it’s a money generator for the state and local governments, and it keeps drivers online.

The Town of Schenectady, meanwhile, is expanding its free municipal Wi-Fi network to neighborhoods not yet connected to the system, including Bellevue, Upper Union, Northside and Woodlawn. This is obviously necessary not only in Schenectady, but in an entire state where about a million households do not have access to high-speed internet or are not connected to it for a variety of reasons, including affordability. The need is all the more evident as the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the gap between the haves and have-nots of broadband, especially schoolchildren who could not participate in online learning.

But there’s a troubling asterisk to the plan: Mayor Gary McCarthy hopes the city can “monetize” the system by selling the data it collects. And what data would it be?

Who could be against saving lives in work areas? Who wouldn’t love free internet everywhere? Who wouldn’t want a safer and more equitable society?

These are fair questions to ask. But they miss the big picture. It is not enough to ask where it ends; we are constantly finding new ways that technology can benefit our lives. The question we need to ask – and that we need to demand from governments that lead us into this new secure and privacyless global debate much more vigorously than they have – is: where should I tend to?


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Bay Area Reporter :: Editorial: The Lieutenant Governor’s Missed Opportunities https://maxkol.org/bay-area-reporter-editorial-the-lieutenant-governors-missed-opportunities/ https://maxkol.org/bay-area-reporter-editorial-the-lieutenant-governors-missed-opportunities/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 21:07:27 +0000 https://maxkol.org/bay-area-reporter-editorial-the-lieutenant-governors-missed-opportunities/ California Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis recently announced that she has formed a transgender advisory council made up of trans leaders from across the state to foster dialogue between state leaders and the transgender community. While we’re happy that she has taken this step – and the nine people selected represent different geographies around the Golden […]]]>

California Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis recently announced that she has formed a transgender advisory council made up of trans leaders from across the state to foster dialogue between state leaders and the transgender community. While we’re happy that she has taken this step – and the nine people selected represent different geographies around the Golden State – one place is missing at the table: there is no one from an agency based in San Francisco who works there.

This is unfortunate for several reasons. Kounalakis hails from San Francisco, which, of course, is home to the world’s first transgender cultural district, the Transgender District. The Mayor’s Office has also established the Office of Transgender Initiatives, which provides information and policy advice to city departments and performs other essential tasks. Even the Pride of San Francisco just announced that it has a trans majority of board members. There are many non-profit organizations serving the trans community, including trans women of color.

As we have reported for years, trans people living in San Francisco are disproportionately affected by homelessness, unemployment and physical violence. This reflects the situation across California, and even across the country. San Francisco has put in place – and funded with millions of dollars – various programs to meet these needs, such as trans adult housing programs and rent subsidies.

By the way, Equality California, the state-wide LGBTQ rights group, provided information to the advisory board after Kounalakis contacted them. We find it somewhat surprising that the EQCA can’t tell us if it recommended someone from San Francisco, given its long-standing ties to the city through its various board members over the years. .

Some of the members of the advisory board and the spokesperson for Kounalakis expect the panel to increase its membership. We recommend that this happen soon, so that more trans Californians can contribute on critical issues affecting the community. As Aria Sa’id, the president and chief strategist of the Transgender District, told us, having no one from San Francisco on the advisory board is indeed a missed opportunity.

Take a stand on Hungary
Kounalakis also missed the opportunity to show solidarity with the LGBTQ community in our report this week on Hungary’s top diplomats who had their pictures taken at San Francisco City Hall last month. It has angered some Hungarian Americans and LGBTQ leaders because Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban launched an anti-LGBTQ tirade ahead of his country’s elections next year. The occasion of the town hall was to observe the National Day of Hungary, which was organized by the mayor’s office of protocol. While the Mayor of London Breed was not present at the raising of the flag, the photoshoot nonetheless prompted his office to issue a statement saying it would increase verification of similar events in the future. Clearly, the photos of Orban government officials greeted at San Francisco City Hall are a potential propaganda stunt for the regime – involving support for a city that is a global beacon for LGBTQ equality.

András Doncsev, Orban’s former speechwriter, is now Hungary’s technology ambassador in Santa Clara and has been posted to San Francisco as a science and technology attaché. Doncsev and Hungarian Honorary Consul Eva E. Voisin attended the event at City Hall. Kounalakis, who served as US ambassador to Hungary during the Obama administration, knows the country well. However, she refused to tell our reporter about the Doncsev photo op or Hungary’s recent anti-LGBTQ propaganda law or its anti-Semitic government.

In 2020, Orban and his ruling Fidesz party launched a barrage of legal assaults against Hungary’s LGBTQ community, ranging from a ban on gender recognition to same-sex marriage and adoption. The country recognizes civil unions. In an interview, Doncsev denied that there is anti-Semitism or homophobia in his country, which is ridiculous. He told BAR that “these are very, very strong serious allegations,” and suggested that we check with the Anti-Defamation League regarding anti-Semitism in Hungary. In fact, in February, the ADL called on Hungary, as well as some lawmakers in the British Labor Party, Poland and Russia for using anti-Semitism for “political” purposes, in a report.

Kounalakis has been a good ally of the LGBTQ community. This year, she co-sponsored a law that benefits the community. Assembly Bill 387, by MP Rebecca Bauer-Kahan (D-Orinda), eliminates gendered language referring to constitutional agents. It was signed by Governor Gavin Newsom. AB 245, by Assembly Member David Chiu (D-San Francisco), would ensure that public colleges and universities in California allow transgender and non-binary students to have their name and gender accurately reflected on academic records. He is currently on the governor’s desk. But being an ally also means standing up to powerful leaders, whether here or abroad. Kounalakis could have used the Hungarian photoshoot to solidify his commitment to the LGBTQ community and its concerned allies, both here in San Francisco and in Hungary, rather than choosing to remain silent.

Help the Bay Area Reporter keep going through these trying times. To support local, independent and LGBTQ journalism, consider becoming a BAR member.


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Editorial summary: Kansas | State https://maxkol.org/editorial-summary-kansas-state/ https://maxkol.org/editorial-summary-kansas-state/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 05:10:42 +0000 https://maxkol.org/editorial-summary-kansas-state/ Kansas City Star. XX September 2021. Editorial: Fans of Kansas leader baselessly fear Afghan refugees are sick terrorists During and after the withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan, Republicans blamed President Joe Biden for leaving our Afghan allies vulnerable. This was valid criticism, albeit highly hypocritical, since the peace deal brokered by the Trump administration […]]]>

Kansas City Star. XX September 2021.

Editorial: Fans of Kansas leader baselessly fear Afghan refugees are sick terrorists

During and after the withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan, Republicans blamed President Joe Biden for leaving our Afghan allies vulnerable. This was valid criticism, albeit highly hypocritical, since the peace deal brokered by the Trump administration would have moved away from those allies even earlier.

After the Trump administration betrayed and abandoned our Kurdish allies in Syria two years ago, many have been slaughtered and none have been evacuated by the United States. ISIS was strengthened and Trump defended the decision he needed to take to get us out of the eternal fighting in the Middle East. The only difference, in other words, is that there was no effort, before, during or after our withdrawal, to protect those we left behind.

By leaving our Afghan allies unprotected, US Representative in Kansas Jake LaTurner said we had “let down our allies and significantly damaged our presence on the world stage.”

But if you accept, as most Americans do, that we couldn’t stay forever, and you also believe, as LaTurner said, that our allies deserve better, then what exactly is our responsibility to them?

Ask this natural follow-up question and all of a sudden those wonderful Afghan allies whose terrible treatment you just bemoaned are transformed into potential sick terrorists. And no, it does not stick.

On Thursday, after reports that around 500 Afghan evacuees would be resettled in Kansas, Ty Masterson, the president of the Kansas Senate, issued the warning: “It could be dangerous to have them in our state.

Evacuees, he said, could come with COVID-19 infections. (Every evacuee entering the United States must pass a health exam. Anyone 12 years of age and older will receive the COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of their status here. And not only are they all vaccinated, but it’s weird. objection for someone who doesn’t think Kansans should have to protect himself and others by getting vaccinated.)

Masterson said that while he was “all about looking after those in trouble,” he stripped that feeling of all meaning by warning that some refugees may be terrorists. Like all refugees, those from Afghanistan will arrive after being fully screened. The Biden administration said every evacuee will go through a security screening process coordinated by the Department of Homeland Security before being admitted into the country.

About 1,200 Afghans are expected to settle in Missouri.

Nothing hospitable can come from qualifying the evacuees as “dangerous”. It sows the seeds of discrimination.

The United States has promised “security to our allies in Afghanistan, to the men and women who risked their lives serving alongside our armed forces, and we must keep our word,” said LaTurner, a member of House Homeland Security. Committee, in a press release. Thusday. Absolutely, he’s right about that.

What is wrong is spreading an unfounded fear that those we have promised to help are sick terrorists.

“It is reckless speech and it creates animosity,” said Peter Makori, refugee resettlement manager at Della Lamb Community Services, one of the agencies ready to help resettle Afghan arrivals in the region. Kansas City.

“We are preparing to embrace these people,” Makori said, and our political leaders “must be careful not to intoxicate the minds of the people to whom these refugees are fleeing while trying to escape persecution. These are people who seek peace.

“I have been in their situation, fleeing persecution, and I know how much the refugees have love and respect for the country that hosts them, that saves their lives. They don’t come in danger, they come with debt.

If we owe them a debt of gratitude, and we do, then we have to keep that in mind.

___

Topeka Capital-Journal. September 18, 2021.

Editorial: The fate of the Docking building has lingered too long. It’s time for Kansas lawmakers to make a decision.

The Docking State Office Building was designed with someone like Don Draper in mind.

Take a look at the photo gallery made by Evert Nelson from Topeka Capital-Journal and you’ll get a feel for what we’re talking about. Its design is straight out of “Mad Men”. The ventilation system was even designed for smokers.

But his current state is more like Draper’s true identity, Dick Whitman – a sad state. The 14-story mid-century structure in the Capitol complex once housed many state agencies. Today, it is mostly vacant. It has not undergone a major renovation since its construction in 1957.

It is time to fix it.

Former Governor Sam Brownback attempted to demolish the building in 2016. When the legislature blocked that plan, Brownback then made deals for decades-long contracts allowing state employees to move their offices to Topeka, transforming essentially the Docking building in a 14 story quagmire. . But in all fairness, space was a dilemma long before that.

Lawmakers have been debating what to do with the building – which honors Governor Robert Docking – for more than a decade.

“Everyone has ideas, and some of them are great ideas and some of them are ideas that have really slowed down this process,” said Senator JR Claeys, R-Salina. “But at the end of the day, we’re at that kind of critical point where we can make a good decision.”

The Kelly administration drew up plans to meet the modern needs of Kansas.

Andrew Bahl of the Topeka Capital-Journal reported that lawmakers are weighing their options on the building’s long-awaited renovation, with a final decision expected later this year. Current proposals call for a renovation of the entire building (the top two floors are not ADA compliant) or a separate plan to reduce its size to three floors, with three new floors added above the structure.

In all fairness, we don’t know which is the best option. Both seem realistic to us, so we’ll give in to the experts. Both plans appear to meet the various needs facing the state.

So where we’re at, let’s do something to move forward. The building has stood tall and nearly empty for too long.

We implore lawmakers to carefully consider the plans proposed by the Kelly administration and implement one. It just makes sense.

We’ll leave you with some farewell tips from Draper himself: “Keep it simple, but meaningful.”

___

Lawrence Journal-World. September 18, 2021.

Editorial: Is it time to rethink the city’s public art program?

Not all communities are where you can attend a city committee meeting and organize an art critic class.

But as you have surely guessed, Lawrence is not just any community. So city commissioners recently found themselves discussing a $ 340,000 proposal to build a public artwork near the city’s new police headquarters in northwest Lawrence. In the majority of Kansas communities, the discussion would likely have centered on whether $ 340,000 should be spent on a public artwork for a little-visited part of town.

This was not at all the conversation in Lawrence, however. Instead, the commissioners questioned whether the artwork sends an unintended message of support for police surveillance. The gazebo-shaped room included eye-shaped features, and there was some debate over what message those eyes sent. As far as discussions about the art of politicians go, this one was pretty good. Almost certainly better than such a conversation would have been in the White House. The president would have just suggested a pair of aviator eye sunglasses and called them good.

If you think this points to an argument for dropping the city’s public art program – which essentially sets money aside for public art when a public building is built – you should check your out again. menu. Yes, Dorothy, you are still in Kansas, but more importantly, you are in Lawrence. The public art program is not going anywhere in Lawrence.

Lawrence has long been established to love art. But, does he love her smartly?

Maybe the community can have a conversation about whether we are spending this public money in the best way on art. While the community can easily tell that they love art, it doesn’t always come across easily. It’s not as if hundreds of people are coming to the unveiling of one of these public works of art. And, probably, many Lawrence artists would attest that it would be very difficult to make a living from the art they sell in Lawrence’s galleries alone. Or, even on a simpler level, do you think a lot of your friends could tell you where Lawrence’s public artwork is located? Could they direct a visitor to a few of them?

We certainly agree that $ 340,000 is a significant amount. That money is already gone, because the city approved the project. But someday there will be another big building project that will produce a considerable amount for public art. Before that day arrives, it may be worth having a conversation about new strategies for spending public art money. Here are some questions worth asking:

• Would it be wise to accumulate several years of public funding for art to commission a much larger piece that could be erected in a much more visible part of the city?

• Does the art have to be permanent, or could the money be used to pay for a truly fantastic national caliber exhibition in one of our many beautiful museums or at the Lawrence Arts Center?

• Can performance art be part of the equation? If so, would it be appropriate to use the money to pay for a concert, or maybe even a multi-week theatrical production that would attract people from all over the area?

• Would it be appropriate to use the money to create a better arts infrastructure in Lawrence? Is there a way for the city to attract more art buyers to the community, which in turn should increase the likelihood of artists living and creating here?

Maybe true art lovers feel that some of these questions have already been answered. But a big takeaway from the recent $ 340,000 police station approval was how uninvolved or excited the public seemed about it all.

That’s not to say the art won’t be great. But it’s still disappointing; $ 340,000 is a lot of money. That should definitely be enough to buy some buzz. As a city that loves art, we should apparently be excited to create it.

TO FINISH


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