Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 06:14:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Editorial photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 Here’s what we know about California’s 2022 election results https://maxkol.org/heres-what-we-know-about-californias-2022-election-results/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 00:16:31 +0000 https://maxkol.org/heres-what-we-know-about-californias-2022-election-results/ Updated November 18, 3:45 p.m. From the gubernatorial race to who will represent the Sacramento area in the state Legislature, California voters have been asked to contest a number of key positions in the 2022 midterm elections. Here’s a look at what we know about the results of some of the state’s major races on […]]]>

Updated November 18, 3:45 p.m.

From the gubernatorial race to who will represent the Sacramento area in the state Legislature, California voters have been asked to contest a number of key positions in the 2022 midterm elections. Here’s a look at what we know about the results of some of the state’s major races on Friday afternoon.

Results for most races may not be finalized for several days as mail-in ballots continue to arrive at county election offices for processing.

CapRadio and NPR rely on The Associated Press for race calls. Here’s information on how the process works and what to expect with results in the next few days.

See the full California election results here and learn more about the state proposal results here.

Statewide offices

Governor

Gavin Newsom will get another term as governor of California after being re-elected, according to a race call from The Associated Press.

Newsom led Republican challenger Brian Dahle, a state senator from rural Northern California, 59-41% on Friday afternoon. The AP called the race just after polls closed on Election Day. After defeating a recall election in 2021, Newsom was in a comfortable position this cycle. He has spent much of the campaign trail this fall championing other Democratic candidates and causes, including a ballot proposal to add abortion rights to the California constitution.

US Senate

Alex Padilla (D) won his first full term in the US Senate after being nominated to fill the seat vacated by Vice President Kamala Harris. It was being contested by attorney Mark Meuser (R). Padilla is actually on the ballot twice, once to complete the rest of Harris’ term and once for his first full term. The AP called both runs for Padilla.

Attorney General

Incumbent Rob Bonta (D) will remain as California attorney general, according to a race appeal from The Associated Press. Bonta got about 59% of the vote Friday afternoon, with challenger Nathan Hochman (R) at 41% with about 87% of the vote expected, according to the AP.

Bonta was appointed to that position by Newsom in early 2021. He replaced Xavier Becerra, who was appointed to a cabinet position in the Biden administration. Hochman is a former federal prosecutor who has never held public office before.

Controller

Democrat Malia Cohen won the race for state comptroller, according to a race call from The Associated Press. Cohen had around 55% of the vote on Friday with Republican Lanhee Chen at 45% with about 86% of the vote expected.

Cohen currently serves on the California Board of Equalization. She is also a former San Francisco supervisor. Chen, a Stanford University professor who has been endorsed by former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang and editorial boards such as the Los Angeles Times and San Francisco Chronicle, was seen as a potential candidate. to be the first Republican to hold statewide office in California since 2006.

Congress

3rd congressional district

Republican Assemblyman Kevin Kiley won 52% of the vote, against 48% for Democrat Dr. Kermit Jones, a doctor and Navy veteran. About 64% of the votes had been counted by Friday afternoon.

Kiley and Jones compete to represent a huge new congressional district that stretches from Plumas County to Death Valley. It also includes the Sacramento-area suburbs of Rocklin, Roseville, and Folsom.

9th Congress District

Josh Harder, an incumbent Democrat, got 56% of the vote while Republican and San Joaquin County Supervisor Tom Patti got 44%. About 80% of the votes had been counted by Friday afternoon.

The 9th district includes Stockton, Lodi, Tracy and Manteca.

State Legislative Assembly

8th Senate District

Angelique Ashby, a member of the Sacramento City Council, obtained 51% of the vote against 49% for the former California insurance commissioner, Dave Jones. With 85% of the votes on Friday afternoon, the race was still too close to be announced.

The two Democrats are in a fierce and expensive race to replace incumbent Senator Richard Pan. An infusion of independent spending in the final weeks of the campaign led to a flurry of negative mailings and ads targeting both candidates.

The seat represents the cities of Sacramento and Elk Grove in the State Senate.

6th Senate District

In the 6th Senate District, former Republican Assemblyman Roger Niello won 53% of the vote to 47% for San Juan Democratic school board member Paula Villescaz. Friday afternoon, 159 174 the votes had been counted. The district includes the Sacramento County communities of Lincoln, Roseville, Folsom, Rancho Cordova, and Galt.

6th Assembly District

Assemblyman Kevin McCarty (D) will serve another term in the state Assembly, according to a race call from The Associated Press. McCarty got 65% of the vote and his challenger, airline pilot Cathy Cook (R), got 35% on Friday with 93% of the expected vote. The district covers Natomas, downtown Sacramento, and the Arden-Arcade area.

7th Assembly District

Republican challenger Josh Hoover has died Iincumbent Assemblyman Ken Cooley by just six votes out of Friday afternoon, 50% to 50%, with the race too close to be announced. According to the AP, about 85% of the expected votes are voted.

Cooley has been in the Legislative Assembly since 2012 and is waiting another two years before reaching the term limit. The district has become more conservative after last year’s redistricting.

10th Assembly District

In another Democrat vs. Democrat race, early results showed Stephanie Nguyen with 54% of the vote while her opponent Eric Guerra had 46%, with about 78% of the vote expected. The race was too close to call with still many ballots. remains to be counted in Sacramento County. Eric Guerra is a Sacramento City Council member and Stephanie Nguyen is an Elk Grove council member who also runs a nonprofit organization.



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Editorial: Red Wave Sparkles – The Gila Herald https://maxkol.org/editorial-red-wave-sparkles-the-gila-herald/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 17:00:22 +0000 https://maxkol.org/editorial-red-wave-sparkles-the-gila-herald/ Photo added Chronicle of Mike Bibb What happened to the much publicized Red Wave? I thought almost every talking head — at least, the ones who are supposed to be super smart on election stuff — assured us that President Joe Biden’s miserable performance in office was going to guarantee a quasi-Republican sweep. In fact, […]]]>

Photo added

Chronicle of Mike Bibb

What happened to the much publicized Red Wave? I thought almost every talking head — at least, the ones who are supposed to be super smart on election stuff — assured us that President Joe Biden’s miserable performance in office was going to guarantee a quasi-Republican sweep.

In fact, the US House and Senate were almost guaranteed to go from blue to red. Even Vegas was betting on the action.

Whoops. After a week of vote counting, Cherry Red switched to Terra Cotta.

Nevertheless, a reddish tint. There is still some hope that the brakes can be applied to many of Biden’s head-scratching fiascos, but not with as much enthusiasm.

In fact, the Dems are having almost as much fun as the Repubs, celebrating that they haven’t been beaten as badly as expected.

When a Democratic candidate from Pennsylvania, whose recent stroke left him partially incoherent, defeats a popular Republican doctor and TV personality, you instinctively sense that things are not looking good for Lincoln’s party.

To rub salt in the wound, the confused new US senator – who has yet to serve a day in Congress – is already being promoted as a possible future presidential candidate.

Sounds pretty much through for the course. The inmates took over.

Almost.

While the Republicans failed to win the Senate, they added a few more House seats. Not overwhelming, but in better shape than them.

Among the advantages, Nancy Pelosi will no longer be in charge. She will just become another voting member with a few committees to attend. That is, if she wants to run like an ordinary congresswoman, minus her big wooden gavel.

However, the greatest advantage of returning to the House is that legislation requiring funding – constitutionally – is mandated by the House of Representatives, pursuant to Article 1, Sec. seven.

That means Biden’s proposal to hire more than 80,000 new IRS agents must first be approved and paid for by a majority of House members.

Given that the IRS is probably the least popular and most despised government agency, it would seem that the chances of additional hordes of federal tax collectors fanning out across the countryside will be greatly reduced.

Besides, what is it for? With a government already over $31 trillion in debt, which regularly prints and spends as much money as it wants – and then complains about inflation – is a colossal tax office really relevant, other than to rush citizens for a few more dollars?

The days when the dollar relied on a solid monetary system are long gone. Now that’s all the Federal Reserve banking system determines the value of our money, how much is in circulation and the interest rates we have to pay on any given day.

When society is severely hampered by a mishandled pandemic, government money and benefits are handed out like candy, and people are no longer encouraged to work, it becomes a seductive incentive for the public to support the device on which this convoluted arrangement is based.

Therefore, unsurprisingly, the Republicans failed to defeat the Democrats.

Equally puzzling, why did Senate Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnel withdraw funds from Arizona’s Blake Masters to support Dr. Mehmet Oz in Pennsylvania? In the end, both races were lost, giving the Democrats two more wins.

Was this blunder a mistake or was it intentional? Seems a bit dodgy.

Republican Senator from Missouri, Josh Hawley, recently commented on the Republicans’ disappointing performance in the midterm elections, lamenting, “The old party is dead. It’s time to bury him. Build something new.

Continuing, he remarked that “Republicanism in Washington lost big on Tuesday night. When your agenda is to give in to Big Pharma on insulin, give in to Schumer on gun control and the Green New Deal (“infrastructure”) and tease changes to Social Security and insurance -disease, you lose.

“What are Republicans really going to do for workers? How about, for starters: tougher tariffs on China, relocating American jobs, opening up American energy to full throttle, 100,000 new cops on the streets. Jailbreak the system.

His final recommendation – “Unrig the system” – pretty much sums it all up.

Realistically, Republicans are likely to have a better chance of strengthening their grip in 2024 when they have a presidential candidate to help them.

Especially, if the Dems still have Biden to face. Until then, it’s unclear what his cognitive state will be, or if he even knows he’s running for re-election.

According to the Gila Herald, on Nov. 14, after a week of tabulating votes, it appears Democrat Katie Hobbs narrowly beat Republican Kari Lake for the governorship of Arizona. Katie copied Joe’s successful campaign strategy of staying home, staying calm and waiting for the vote count.

The happy fact that her position as Arizona’s current secretary of state, in charge of elections, probably had no bearing on her victory.

Of course, by questioning such inconvenient truths, a person runs the risk of being labeled “An election denier”; something similar to a “democracy destroyer”. Only worse!!!

“Electrically They Keep an Election Score” – The Beat Goes On, Sonny & Cher, 1967. Honestly, I replaced “election” with the original phrase “baseball”. Fifty-five years later, Sonny doesn’t care, but Cher might.

The opinions expressed in this editorial are those of the author.

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Draupadi Murmu gets emotional while visiting his Alma Mater in Bhubaneswar https://maxkol.org/draupadi-murmu-gets-emotional-while-visiting-his-alma-mater-in-bhubaneswar/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 09:07:36 +0000 https://maxkol.org/draupadi-murmu-gets-emotional-while-visiting-his-alma-mater-in-bhubaneswar/ On Friday, President Draupadi Murmu grew emotional as she sat down on the cot she used to sleep on during her student days in the 1970s at Unit II Government Girl’s High School. Murmu on the second day of her tour in Odisha visited her alma mater and the Kuntala Kumari Sabat Adivasi hostel where […]]]>

On Friday, President Draupadi Murmu grew emotional as she sat down on the cot she used to sleep on during her student days in the 1970s at Unit II Government Girl’s High School.

Murmu on the second day of her tour in Odisha visited her alma mater and the Kuntala Kumari Sabat Adivasi hostel where she used to stay during her school days. She also met 13 classmates and expressed her joy to be among her classmates, students from her school and teachers.

The President started the day by visiting Tapabana High School in Khandagiri in the city. Reminiscing about his school days, Murmu said, “I started my schooling in my village of Uparbeda. There was no school building, but a thatched roof house where we used to study.

Calling today’s children ‘lucky’, the president said: ‘We used to sweep the classrooms, clean the school premises with cow dung. era studied with a free spirit. I ask you to work hard and concentrate on your studies.”

During an interaction with female students, Murmu said, “In our time, there were no such facilities as internet, television and other arrangements to know the world outside us. As such , I have no role models from outside My grandmother was my role I saw how she helped people, especially women in our area My grandmother was mentally very strong and I learned a lot from his life.

When Murmu reached her alma mater where she studied from grades 8 to 11, schoolchildren greeted her. She entered the school premises, waving at the people who had been waiting impatiently outside the campus to catch a glimpse of her since morning.

She also visited the Kuntala Kumari Sabat Hostel, where she stayed while attending public school. “When we showed the president her bedroom and the cot she used to sleep on as a student, she got emotional and sat on the same bed for a while,” a woman said. teacher.

The president also planted a sapling in the premises of the Kuntala Kumari Sabat hostel where she stayed for four years from 1970 to 1974. Later, Murmu met her classmates, who were invited to school.

“It was a different time in our lives that the President of India invited us to see us. We cannot express this feeling and we are so happy after meeting the first citizen of the country, who was our classmate during school days,” said Chinmayee Mohanty, a retired college professor and classmate of Murmu.

Murmu inquired about his other roommates at the inn and asked, “Where’s Chuni?” Incidentally, Murmu’s friend Chuni was absent on occasion. “We are really proud to have such a great friend. However, we couldn’t talk much even when the president approached us. She clicked the picture with us,” Mohanty said.

Taking to Twitter, the Indian President said: “It was a nostalgic moment today when I visited my alma mater Government Girls High School and Kuntalakumari Sabat Adivasi Girls Hostel in Bhubaneswar. The visit reminded me of fond memories of my student life. Murmu also expressed her delight after finding a sand drawing of her created at her school premises.

(With PTI inputs)

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Known for her performance art, Carolee Schneeman was first and foremost a painter https://maxkol.org/known-for-her-performance-art-carolee-schneeman-was-first-and-foremost-a-painter/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 17:38:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/known-for-her-performance-art-carolee-schneeman-was-first-and-foremost-a-painter/ Carolee Schneemann was a pioneering feminist artist whose work defies easy categorization. Known primarily as a provocative performance artist, she was adamant throughout her life that she was first and foremost a painter. The sheer diversity of work in “Carolee Schneemann: Body Politics” – on view until January 8, 2023 at the Barbican Center in […]]]>

Carolee Schneemann was a pioneering feminist artist whose work defies easy categorization. Known primarily as a provocative performance artist, she was adamant throughout her life that she was first and foremost a painter. The sheer diversity of work in “Carolee Schneemann: Body Politics” – on view until January 8, 2023 at the Barbican Center in London – may cause viewers to question that claim. However, Schneemann defied the constraints of the medium of painting in the same way that she defied the limits that society sought to impose on her as a woman.

In Schneemann’s early gesture paintings, viewers can see the influence of Abstract Expressionism and the work of Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne, whom Schneemaan discovered as a young woman. For instance, Aria Duetto (Cantata n°78) The Yellow Ladies (1957), named after a piece of choral music by Johann Sebastian Bach, features a languidly reclining female nude entangled in a sea of ​​dancing, vibrating brushstrokes. They sweep across the canvas as if Schneemann were painting to the beat of the song. And in Sir Henry Francis Taylor (1961), an eccentric array of materials—including underpants, metal chains, and a photograph of the subject—emerge from thick swirls of paint. Often, the canvas exists rather as a surface to be transformed.

Schneemann soon sought to expand his work beyond the frame. Her “pictorial constructions,” as she called them, feature embellished surfaces that frequently grow into the viewer’s space. In the case of Colorado House (1962), the work takes on an almost sculptural form. With torn and cut segments of what Schneemann considered failed paintings serving as the base, the artist added elements of his everyday life, such as a whiskey bottle label, a broomstick, pieces of fur and brushes. A piece of painted canvas, shaped like a flag, flies overhead, as if to celebrate the artist’s new format.

Schneemann’s own body becomes both canvas and material in the series of photographs “Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera” (1963). In the images, the artist appears naked with streaks of paint on her torso and surrounded by studio equipment, ropes and transparent plastic sheeting. For her “Dust” series (1983-1986), she returns powerfully to the canvas to create abstract explosions of paint, dust, ash, broken glass and metal fragments that evoke the devastation of the Lebanese civil war.

Recent scholarship and exhibitions have argued that Schneemann’s performances, films, and multimedia installations can also be considered a form of “kinetic painting”, further challenging the limits of the medium. So, yes, Carolee Schneemann was a painter, but firmly on her own terms.

Thumbnail: Carolee Schneemann, installation view of “Body Politics” at the Barbican Centre, 2022. © 2022 Carolee Schneemann Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London. Photo by Lia Toby, Getty Images. Courtesy of the Barbican Centre.

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JKC Gallery “Twosday Talks” Monthly conference of photographic artists scheduled for November 8, 2022 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. https://maxkol.org/jkc-gallery-twosday-talks-monthly-conference-of-photographic-artists-scheduled-for-november-8-2022-from-630-p-m-to-730-p-m/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 08:24:54 +0000 https://maxkol.org/jkc-gallery-twosday-talks-monthly-conference-of-photographic-artists-scheduled-for-november-8-2022-from-630-p-m-to-730-p-m/ Trenton, NJ – The James Kerney Campus (JKC) Gallery at Mercer County Community College at 137 North Broad Street in Trenton is proud to present its upcoming photography presentation “Twosday Talks” on November 8, 2022 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. feature works and presentations by artists Mel Evans and Jackie Neale. The discussions will take place live […]]]>

Trenton, NJ – The James Kerney Campus (JKC) Gallery at Mercer County Community College at 137 North Broad Street in Trenton is proud to present its upcoming photography presentation “Twosday Talks” on November 8, 2022 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. feature works and presentations by artists Mel Evans and Jackie Neale. The discussions will take place live and on the Zoom conference platform. All are invited to register at jkcgallery.online.

“Twosday Talks” is curated by Heather Palecek and Habiyb Shu’Aib and moderated by JKC Gallery Director Professor Michael Chovan-Dalton.

Chovan-Dalton remarked, “This will be our last ‘Twosday Talks’ of the semester and I am pleased to welcome artists Jackie Neale and Mel Evans who will share their works and discuss their personal approaches to artistic expression.

About the artists

Jackie Neale is a Brooklyn and Philadelphia-based artist, photographer, imagery specialist, cinematographer and producer who is inspired by interpersonal relationships and the barrier that disappears/appears once a camera is introduced into the mix. Also an author, Neale focuses on using historical, traditional, digital and experimental processes for multimedia documentary portraiture projects. A professor of photography at Saint Joseph’s University and the New York Film Academy in New York, Neale is known for her social activism work and her chronicling of the immigration experience in the United States and Europe.

Exhibitions of Neale’s photographs have been mounted in galleries and museums across the United States. She has appeared on National Public Radio and in the documentary “Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film”. Her work has appeared in editorial magazines across the United States, online, and as collateral for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Neale recently raised funds to self-publish her photo book, “#SubwaySeries.”

For more on Jackie Neale, visit: https://archive.jackiephoto.com/index/G0000u3SJgEuJNBQ and on Instagram and Facebook.

Mel Evans joins “Twosday Talks” with an impressive 40-year history of photojournalism. Taking photographs almost every working day of his life, Evans’ goal is to make every photograph as interesting and artful as the situation allows. Thousands of images of Evans have appeared in newspapers, magazines and websites in the United States and around the world.

Evans retired from The Associated Press in 2017 and continues to take on editorial and business assignments while embarking on new projects that satisfy his own pursuits and creative desires. Currently, Evans is focused on taking a serious approach to alternative and historical processes in large format “trying to learn as much as possible and honor those who came before”.

Evans is a founding member of the Monalog Collective which is a group of photographers who only use historical analog processes.

To learn more about Mel Evans, visit: https://melevans.photoshelter.com/archive.

For more information on registering and participating in person or online, please visit JKCGallery.online.

About “Twosday Talks” at JKC Gallery

The ‘Twosday Talks’ artist talks are an extension of the ‘Third Thursday’ series launched by Heather Palecek and Habiyb Shu’Aib as a platform for artists to showcase their work to Trenton and the regional community. The events quickly reached audiences from New York to Philadelphia. With the introduction of virtual and in-person hybrid exhibitions, JKC Gallery now showcases artists from across the United States and beyond with a global audience.

– – – – – – – –
Located at 137 North Broad Street, Trenton, New Jersey, the JKC Gallery at Mercer County Community College is a gallery of photography and lens-based works by international and regional artists. To learn more about shows and entry requirements, including Zoom links, please visit JKCGallery.online. Please email jkcgallery@mccc.edu for gallery hours and in-person viewing. Anyone interested in learning more about the photography and visual arts programs at Mercer County Community College, please visit https://www.mccc.edu/catalog/photo_afa.shtml to see the list of courses.

Visit the JKC gallery online

Current news

CCMC home page

The final “Twosday Talks” photography presentation of the semester will be held at Mercer County Community College’s James JKC Gallery at 137 North Broad Street in Trenton on November 8, 2022 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. This month will feature the works Mel Evans and Jackie Neale. The public is invited in person or via the Zoom conference platform. One must reserve. To register, please visit JKCGallery.online or email JKCGallery@mccc.edu. (Poster credit: JKC Gallery, Mel Evans and Jackie Neale.)

blue sky ball Jackie Neale

Brooklyn and Philadelphia-based artist Jackie Neale will discuss his works November 8 at JKC Gallery in Trenton. (Photo credit: “Bullet at the Blue Sky” by Jackie Neale.)

CurvedTreesMelEvans

Mel Evans joins the ‘Twosday Talks’ final photographic presentation and artist talk of the semester at JKC Gallery on November 8, 2022 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. To register, please visit JKCGallery.online or email JKCGallery@mccc.edu. (Photo credit: “Bent Trees by Mel Evans.)

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‘Kind of a Drag’ Reveals the Personal Side of Famous Illustrators Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos https://maxkol.org/kind-of-a-drag-reveals-the-personal-side-of-famous-illustrators-antonio-lopez-and-juan-ramos/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 20:22:49 +0000 https://maxkol.org/kind-of-a-drag-reveals-the-personal-side-of-famous-illustrators-antonio-lopez-and-juan-ramos/ With the spread of drag via “RuPaul’s Drag Race”, my generation sometimes has the mistaken understanding that our liberated expression of gender is new and by we. This exhibit claims that it began generations ago. The show was curated by Cooney and created in partnership with Paul Caranicas, Ramos’ partner of 24 years. “It’s something […]]]>

With the spread of drag via “RuPaul’s Drag Race”, my generation sometimes has the mistaken understanding that our liberated expression of gender is new and by we. This exhibit claims that it began generations ago.

The show was curated by Cooney and created in partnership with Paul Caranicas, Ramos’ partner of 24 years. “It’s something I’ve wanted to do for so long, and I’ve had a lot of false starts,” Caranicas told me over the phone. “Antonio and Juan have always been interested in all alternate versions of beauty and different ways of approaching masculinity, femininity and fuzziness, so we decided to call it ‘Kind of A Drag’ and include portraits of men with long hair and jewelry on, or women who had too much makeup on, something that would reflect the idea of ​​drag,” he explained.

From the 1970s, the duo were embraced by the fashion world, working with designers like Karl Lagerfeld and Charles James (who had a big influence on them both, says Caranicas) and making illustrations for Interview and voguewhere they stood alone or next to editorial photographs by David Bailey and Peter Lindbergh.

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Editorial Summary: Nebraska https://maxkol.org/editorial-summary-nebraska/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 20:17:38 +0000 https://maxkol.org/editorial-summary-nebraska/ Omaha World Herald. October 27, 2022. Editorial: Photo ID Initiative Adds Unnecessary Burden to Some Nebraska Voters Voting is a right, and no unnecessary speed bumps should be placed in the way of Nebraskanians who want to exercise that right. That’s why Initiative 432, a proposed constitutional amendment to require voters to show “valid photo” […]]]>

Omaha World Herald. October 27, 2022.

Editorial: Photo ID Initiative Adds Unnecessary Burden to Some Nebraska Voters

Voting is a right, and no unnecessary speed bumps should be placed in the way of Nebraskanians who want to exercise that right.

That’s why Initiative 432, a proposed constitutional amendment to require voters to show “valid photo” ID before voting, is a bad idea.

The amendment would apply to voters who go to the polls as well as those who mail their ballots early, without exception. The legislature would establish the specific rules if the initiative passes.

Some say Nebraska’s voter ID rules would become among the most restrictive in the country.

This election measure is an overreaction to unfounded concerns about election security. If passed, it would unfairly force some of our fellow citizens to take additional steps to vote. And the additional charges could undermine the goal of encouraging all Nebraskans to exercise their right to vote.

People also read…

Nebraska Secretary of State Bob Evnen, who supports the voter ID proposal, acknowledges that Nebraska hasn’t had a problem with voter fraud in general — let alone cases of people trying to impersonate. others in order to be able to vote. World-Herald reporter Martha Stoddard also found that no more than a handful of such cases have occurred in a nationwide election.

Anyone who tries to impersonate a voter is breaking applicable law and must be prosecuted. But our elections are not stolen that way.

We understand the superficial appeal of requiring photo ID. Most of us already have driver’s licenses or alternative state-issued IDs. And we’re all used to showing photo ID to get on a plane or buy booze or open a bank account — although most of those are voluntary activities, not constitutional rights like the vote.

But consider who might not already have that driver’s license in their purse or wallet: low-income people who can’t afford a car. Young people who didn’t want to be added to their family’s car insurance just yet. Those who moved to Nebraska from major cities with plenty of public transportation and limited parking, so they never needed permits. Seniors who may have stopped driving.

They still deserve equal voting rights.

Supporters of the 432 Initiative say these people can get another piece of photo ID. An estimated 25,000 eligible voters would need it. Since voting is a right, Nebraska should make these alternate IDs free. Proponents say it would cost $100,000 a year; opponents say it could cost $750,000 a year, including an education program to help citizens learn the new rules, plus $2.2 million in setup costs.

But that’s exactly what state taxpayers would pay. The onus would be on individual citizens to go the extra mile and likely incur costs if they want to vote.

To obtain an ID card, they had to find the time and resources to go to the Department of Motor Vehicles office and wait in one or more lines. Many of us have experienced this drudgery.

But that’s not all. Applicants will need to bring documents to the DMV, such as a copy of a birth certificate. If that’s not practical, they may have to go to the courthouse or send to another state to get one, at some cost. And all of that would be trickier for someone who, after all, doesn’t have a license to drive anywhere.

Which groups might find these tasks particularly difficult? Low-income people. The elderly. People with mobility problems. Those who need time off from work.

And what about postal ballots? It’s unclear what the Nebraska rules would be, but some states require a voter to submit a photocopy of their license or ID card with their ballot. Not everyone has easy access to a copier.

Also, the concept of photo ID is not foolproof. Dishonest people have been known to use fake, stolen, or borrowed IDs for other purposes.

Our nation’s history includes shameful attempts to disenfranchise certain types of citizens through poll tax and vote testing. In Mississippi, for example, applicants once had to write a citizenship essay, with officials deciding who passed. Often this meant that black candidates were denied the right to vote.

This photo ID proposal does not share the same goal of deterring minority voters, we hope. But it certainly goes against the spirit of the Nebraska constitution, which says “there shall be no impediment or impediment to the right of any qualified voter to exercise the elective franchise.”

Certain eligible voters in Nebraska will certainly be bothered or bothered by this additional requirement. Voters should vote no on Initiative 432.

The Lincoln Journal star. October 26, 2022.

Editorial: Corrections must be accountable

Last year, the Nebraska Department of Corrections received funding to develop a plan for a “halfway house,” a structured environment for parole violators without sending them back to jail.

During this 2021 session, the Legislative Assembly also commissioned a comprehensive review of facilities and a study to determine if inmates were properly classified based on security and scheduling needs.

In 2015, lawmakers required the department to produce an electronic medical record tracking system and study the effectiveness of its rehabilitation programs.

To date, none of the studies, plans or systems have been produced.

That failure to produce the reports last week has senators rightly questioning whether the troubled and recalcitrant department intentionally ignored the guidelines. The situation will most likely place him under even greater scrutiny for the failed policies and inaction that have contributed to Nebraska having the most overcrowded prison system in the nation.

Acting Director of Corrections Diane Sabatka-Rine, who had only been in the job for four days at the time of the Judiciary Committee’s public hearing into the failure to file reports, had a handful of apologies and explanations for the inaction of the department which seemed, frankly, unconvincing.

The facilities study, she said, will be done by the end of the year and the inmate classification study by March, both more than a year after they should have been completed. The 2015 programming study was initiated but never completed due to staff turnover, another chronic problem in the Correctional Service.

Most troubling of all, the department has signaled that it will create 96 halfway house beds for parolees, changing, without permission, the legislature’s intention to create the house midway.

The latter is simply an open challenge to a legislative mandate and should be rescinded.

The delays, suggested Omaha Sen. Steve Lathrop, appear to have been deliberate. The practical impact has been the withholding of information and analysis from the public as senators earlier this year debated the need for a new $270 million, 1,500-bed prison to replace the US Penitentiary. State of Nebraska.

The senators set aside money for a new prison, but, wisely, did not appropriate it. So the issues of a new jail, overcrowding and the need for sentencing and corrections reform will certainly come back to the Legislative Assembly in January.

It will be a new session with a new legislature which we hope, unlike its predecessors who have repeatedly thrown those cans on the road, will take meaningful steps to address the issues.

There will also be a new administration on Capitol Hill next year, a change that again we hope will produce a more cooperative and transparent relationship with the Legislative Assembly and the public than that of the Ricketts administration and by former manager Scott Frakes.

And, most importantly, reports and studies must be completed and made public before the Legislative Assembly considers bills, has debates, or takes a single vote on correctional matters.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Inside… Setting up the WFH by Dominique McMullan, Editorial Director of IMAGE https://maxkol.org/inside-setting-up-the-wfh-by-dominique-mcmullan-editorial-director-of-image/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 21:34:06 +0000 https://maxkol.org/inside-setting-up-the-wfh-by-dominique-mcmullan-editorial-director-of-image/ As many of us can realize, working from home while raising young children is all about balancing act. For our own Dominique McMullan – who operates on a hybrid model – separating work time from downtime and business from pleasure is absolutely essential. Since remote work has become a more easily accessible option, the world […]]]>

As many of us can realize, working from home while raising young children is all about balancing act. For our own Dominique McMullan – who operates on a hybrid model – separating work time from downtime and business from pleasure is absolutely essential.

Since remote work has become a more easily accessible option, the world of work has completely changed. If you haven’t perfected your own home office setup yet, we get some tips from those in the know.

From daily to-do lists and a hot cup of coffee from her little blue coffee maker to blue-light glasses and on-the-go lunches, read on for an overview of Dominique’s WFH routine, interiors, tips and tricks…


What are the absolute essentials that everyone should have in their WFH setup?

Good lighting. I find that on a dark day, turning on my little lamp and lighting a candle really helps my mood. Also a good selection of pens, a small notebook, a nice hand cream and a plant!

What do you keep handy on your WFH desk?

A cup of something hot.

Have you decorated your WFH space with photos, artwork, or music devices?

I have a picture of my eldest son – my youngest is one year old and I still don’t have pictures of him printed! End the Second Child Syndrome there! I also have a few small relics – a smiling Budda, a Portuguese chicken nativity scene and a small silver elephant. All of them have a meaning even if they are, admittedly, quite bizarre!

What motivates you when working remotely?

My to-do list is essential every day. I write down the three things I want to accomplish this week and make sure to keep coming back to them. It’s so easy to get carried away with other people’s emails and to-do lists!

dominique mcmullan wfh

How do you balance working from home and having young children?

I send them to daycare in the morning with a smile!!

Do you have a particular coffee break routine at home?

Yes, I have a little blue coffee maker that I love (and which is falling apart!). I make my coffee in there and drink it sitting outside on my bench and take five minutes to think about the fresh air.

What’s your favorite lunch to prepare at home?

Wow good question. Either a good bowl of rice, a veggie burger or something with eggs. It’s such a bonus to be able to cook a great meal for lunch.

dominique mcmullan wfh

How to break the monotony of the day?

I try to make phone calls when I feel like I need to move, rather than Zoom or email. You can’t beat chatting with someone face to face, but a phone call is a close second.

Do you have a go-to procrastination method and how do you get back in the zone?

INSTAGRAM. I’m terrible at scrolling Instagram, who isn’t these days? I block out half hours on my iCal and get notifications when I need to start working on something different, which usually gets me out of whatever I’m procrastinating into!

Do you have any tips for maintaining your posture and avoiding back pain or eye strain?

I think getting up and walking every 30 minutes or so is the best way to avoid all of this. I also occasionally wear Ambr blue light blocking glasses (when I can remember!)

How do you separate the useful from the pleasant when you stop at night?

I’m pretty good at closing the laptop and being able to turn it off. I kind of have to because that’s when I have to pick up the boys and until they go to bed there’s no way there’s going to be work!

How does this compare to working in the office?

I like the WFH some days, but other days I like being in the office. That’s the advantage of working flexibly – different types of work require (and benefit from) different environments. When I’m home, I can do a lot of writing, strategic thinking, and planning. When I’m in the office, I can think creatively, brainstorm, and accomplish small tasks through conversations instead of emails.

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NY Times editorial board member slams Fetterman, other candidates reluctant to debate: ‘risk to our democracy’ https://maxkol.org/ny-times-editorial-board-member-slams-fetterman-other-candidates-reluctant-to-debate-risk-to-our-democracy/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 19:40:58 +0000 https://maxkol.org/ny-times-editorial-board-member-slams-fetterman-other-candidates-reluctant-to-debate-risk-to-our-democracy/ Michelle Cottle, a member of the New York Times editorial board, chastised Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman and other prominent midterm candidates for avoiding debates in their campaigns. Cottle claimed in an op-ed on Monday that political candidates trying to walk out of debates were part of a trend that reflects a “troubling sign […]]]>

Michelle Cottle, a member of the New York Times editorial board, chastised Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman and other prominent midterm candidates for avoiding debates in their campaigns.

Cottle claimed in an op-ed on Monday that political candidates trying to walk out of debates were part of a trend that reflects a “troubling sign of our political times” and puts “democracy at risk of descending further into crisis.”

Her comment was part of an article outlining the upcoming debate between Fetterman and her Republican opponent, Dr. Mehmet Oz, to be aired on Tuesday, a debate she described as having “captured the high-stakes essence , uncertain and causing migraine”. of this bizarre election cycle.”

KATIE HOBBS STILLS WHEN PRESSED TO REFUSE TO DEBATE KARI LAKE: ‘THE DEBATE ON THE DEBATES IS OVER’

WALLINGFORD, PA – OCTOBER 15: Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman holds a rally at Nether Providence Elementary School on October 15, 2022 in Wallingford, Pennsylvania. Election Day will take place nationwide on November 8, 2022. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

After describing the two candidates and illustrating the unusual nature of the Pennsylvania Senate race, which was marred by Fetterman’s health issues and Oz’s criticism of his “medical work”, she began her discussion of the difficulty of their debate to come together.

Cottle wrote, “After many back and forths between campaigns, Mr. Fetterman accepted only one debate, pushed back to this late date in the campaign calendar.” She also noted, “While the idiosyncrasies of the Pennsylvania race are unusual, the minimalist approach to the debate is bottom-up”, and spent the rest of her column denouncing this new trend.

“Over the past decade, the number of debates in competitive racing has gone down, and they seem to be headed for floppy disks and fax machines,” Cottle wrote, adding, “This election season, barring unforeseen developments, major Les Senate candidates in Georgia, Arizona, North Carolina and Florida, as in Pennsylvania, will only play each other once.”

The author mentioned that the midterm Senate race in Nevada will not include any debate, adding, “Similarly, Republican and Democratic candidates in Missouri have yet to agree on terms to appear together.”

Cottle said, “This trend is not limited to the Senate. Several gubernatorial candidates have so far chosen to avoid debate.” She even noted how the GOP “voted to keep its candidates out of events hosted by the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates unless it revises its rules for how debates are conducted.”

She summed up this trend by saying, “This is such a big step for a democracy that is already under pressure.”

JOHN FETTERMAN’S RECORD CRITICISM AHEAD OF DEBATE WITH DR. oz

Katie Hobbs defended her refusal to debate Kari Lake during her appearance on "GMA3: what you need to know" Friday

Katie Hobbs defended her refusal to debate Kari Lake during her appearance on ‘GMA3: What You Need To Know’ on Friday
(ABC)

Cottle blamed America’s burgeoning partisan bubbles, writing, “Once upon a time, candidates felt pressured into participating in debates. inclined to brave this arena.”

She added: “Increasingly, campaigns are deciding that these confrontations are simply not worth the work or the risk involved.”

However, the author blasted the apologies, writing, “Debates are not meant to be conducted for the electoral advantage of the candidates. They are meant to benefit the voting public. Debates require political opponents to engage face to face. voters an opportunity to see candidates define and defend their priorities and visions beyond the length of a tweet or Instagram post.”

3D rendering of a galloping painted donkey.  The donkey is the symbol of the Democratic Party in the United States.

3D rendering of a galloping painted donkey. The donkey is the symbol of the Democratic Party in the United States.

Cottle concluded it, morsel, saying, “But the loss of this ritual is another troubling sign of our political times and of a democracy at risk of descending further into crisis as its foundations are gradually eroded.”

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Makeup artists slept and made my skin clearer https://maxkol.org/makeup-artists-slept-and-made-my-skin-clearer/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 15:23:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/makeup-artists-slept-and-made-my-skin-clearer/ Great British Bake Off star Nadiya Hussain said she was ‘too scared’ to speak out when makeup artists and photo editors ‘lightened’ her skin. The famous baker, who grew up in Luton to Bangladeshi parents, said people were applying makeup to her because they couldn’t find the right foundation and the resulting images would show […]]]>

Great British Bake Off star Nadiya Hussain said she was ‘too scared’ to speak out when makeup artists and photo editors ‘lightened’ her skin.

The famous baker, who grew up in Luton to Bangladeshi parents, said people were applying makeup to her because they couldn’t find the right foundation and the resulting images would show her with lighter skin.

Ms Hussain also claimed she didn’t wear makeup until her late twenties because cosmetics companies didn’t make foundations in the right shades for darker skin tones.

“I didn’t get into makeup until my late twenties because I could never find the right shade of foundation,” she told the Mirror.

“It may seem very small to a lot of people, but for those of us who can’t find foundation, you really feel left out. You feel like there’s a whole beauty industry out there. don’t think about you and that you almost don’t exist.

She told the newspaper that she cried the first time she found a foundation to match her skin. “I had spent my whole life feeling like I didn’t belong.”

“The complexion changed without consent”

Ms Hussain, who has presented numerous TV programs and written several cookbooks since rising to fame in 2015, said her complexion had changed in photo shoots without consulting her.

“At first I had magazine pictures and felt my skin was clearer [afterwards],” she says. “I’ve also had instances where I’ve sat in a makeup artist’s chair and they have visibly cleared my skin.”

However, as a relatively newcomer to the celebrity world, she felt unable to express herself.

“If someone did that to me now, I would say, ‘absolutely not possible. It’s not correct. But at the time, I was afraid to rock the boat. This would never happen with my makeup artist, who really knows my skin.

The TV baker also said she was troubled by the influence of social media on her daughter’s beauty expectations.

“I try so hard to filter this on social media for her, but when she sees it, we talk about it. I think it’s really important to talk to him about what’s real and what’s not.

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