Architectural photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:43:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Architectural photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 Save $350 on the Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 for Nikon F mount https://maxkol.org/save-350-on-the-sigma-10-20mm-f-3-5-for-nikon-f-mount/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 13:28:36 +0000 https://maxkol.org/save-350-on-the-sigma-10-20mm-f-3-5-for-nikon-f-mount/ If you are looking for the best wide angle lens (opens in a new tab) then they are not much wider than the Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM which is currently on sale at B&H with a whopping $350 off, now priced at just $299 (opens in a new tab). Covering an ultra-wide range, […]]]>

If you are looking for the best wide angle lens (opens in a new tab) then they are not much wider than the Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM which is currently on sale at B&H with a whopping $350 off, now priced at just $299 (opens in a new tab).

Covering an ultra-wide range, the Nikon F-mount 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM from Sigma is a versatile zoom well-suited for landscape, architectural and interior photography. The lens’ optical design incorporates a series of low dispersion and aspherical elements, which help reduce chromatic and spherical aberrations throughout the zoom range, as well as improve sharpness and clarity, ensuring that all your Ultra-wide images have consistent sharpness.

Sebastian Oakley

For nearly two decades, Sebastian’s work has been published around the world. Originally specializing in horse riding, his visuals have been used by the biggest names in the equestrian industry such as La Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), The Jockey Club, Horse & Hound and many more for various campaigns. commercials, books and pre/post-event highlights.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, holds a Foundation Diploma in Equestrian Science and holds an MA in Publishing. He is a member of Nikon NPS and has been a Nikon user since film days using a Nikon F5 and saw the digital transition with Nikon’s D-series cameras and is still to this day the youngest member to be elected to BEWA, The British Equestrian Writers’ Association.

He knows and shows great interest in medium and large format photography with products from Phase One, Hasselblad, Alpa and Sinar and has used many film cameras like Sony, RED, ARRI and all the rest. His work spans the genres of equestrian, landscape, abstract or nature and combines nearly two decades of experience to offer exclusive limited edition prints to the international scene from his film and his digital photography.

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Bodrum is the most authentic beach destination this summer https://maxkol.org/bodrum-is-the-most-authentic-beach-destination-this-summer/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 14:16:16 +0000 https://maxkol.org/bodrum-is-the-most-authentic-beach-destination-this-summer/ Bodrum is quickly becoming a sought-after destination for those looking for an exotic vacation on the Aegean Sea. The city captivates with its unspoilt natural beauty, rich culture and warm hospitality. The growing enthusiasm for the Turkish coastline has prompted airlines to increase flight routes, making Bodrum now easily accessible. At the entrance to the […]]]>

Bodrum is quickly becoming a sought-after destination for those looking for an exotic vacation on the Aegean Sea. The city captivates with its unspoilt natural beauty, rich culture and warm hospitality. The growing enthusiasm for the Turkish coastline has prompted airlines to increase flight routes, making Bodrum now easily accessible.

At the entrance to the Gulf of Gokova, Bodrum has seen various incarnations of the ancient Greek city Halicarnassus in its medieval iteration as Petronium. Thousands of years of diverse influences have shaped the vibrancy of the city’s art, architecture, textiles and cuisine. Emphasis is also placed on the use of natural resources, which extends to the Turkish gastronomic tradition embracing the local terroir, the olive trees and the wood fire.

After spending most of a week in Bodrum, I was impressed with how close it was to ancient history, the skill of its craftsmen and the quality of its cuisine, although what I left behind was more than that: I was touched by the hearts of his people. There was a depth of sincerity in my interactions with the locals that left me smiling throughout my journey. A vacation in Bodrum is an adventure in a land full of authenticity.

What to see

Zai Bodrum

Zai Bodrum is a series of contemporary structures blending nature, art and Turkish gastronomy, resulting in an open-air cultural oasis. Owners Yunus and Derya Büyükkuşoğlu showcase their extensive personal collection of regional art in a rotating exhibition. Gallery owner Anna Laudel has an outpost on the grounds, currently featuring artist Flóra Borsi in a solo exhibition “Part of Me”.

Mathieu Forget: “The invitation to travel”

The interactive photographic exhibition by movement artist and performer Mathieu Forget “L’invitation au voyage” highlighting Turkish architecture is presented for the summer season at EDITION Bodrum. Viewers can download a QR code to see the performance of Forget, known as “The Flying Man”, come to life. On site, you can also see the hotel’s impressive permanent collection of Turkish artists..

Where to eat

The kitchen

World-renowned Turkish chef Osman Sezener brings his talent to the world stage at this vibrant seaside restaurant. Using local ingredients, natural processes and a wood-fired oven, The Kitchen presents a perfect fusion of Anatolian and Aegean gastronomy . With locally caught seafood in Bodrum and the Cesme Peninsula, it’s no surprise that the most popular dish is the catch of the day.

Kahraman Bodrum

Kahraman Bodrum is a traditional fish restaurant nestled in a quiet bay in Yalıkavak. Customers are welcome to choose from a wide selection of Turkish mezes. Although Kahraman Bodrum is an affordable dining experience, the restaurant does not compromise on service. Make a reservation for dinner, as it’s an idyllic spot to watch the sun sink over the horizon.

Where to stay

Deluxe Sea View Room at Bodrum EDITION.

THE Bodrum EDITION

From the moment guests step into the luxury beachfront hotel, they step into a serene paradise. The lobby is neutral and airy, with long linen curtains fluttering in the breeze, framing the dark sea view. Guests can spend their days snoozing in a private cabana or enjoying a restorative spa treatment. Stroll or take a buggy through the jasmine lined paths to the beach. The staff are attentive and accommodating, always making guests feel at home. The Bodrum EDITION is paradise in its purest form.

Elementa

This boutique hotel describes itself as “Bodrum’s best kept secret” and is a great budget option. Modern rooms have terraces lined with bright purple floral vines and glimpses of the bay. Although the hotel is not located directly on the beach, it does have an expansive swimming pool. Relax in the charming sculpture gardens or sample a Mediterranean dish at the Agora restaurant.

What to explore

Photography via The Bodrum Guide.

Dibeklihan Cultural and Artistic Village

Dibeklihan channels the spirit of the Silk Road caravanserais. Hidden in the mountains between Bodrum and Yalıkavak, this architectural gem is home to an eclectic mix of artisan shops, cafes and venues. Wander the stone hallways and browse the ceramics, caftans, jewelry, and antiques on offer. Dibeklihan also has a rotating exhibition currently featuring Turkish artist Zehra Sargin.

Mausoleum of Halicarnassus

Bodrum is home to the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The tomb was built between 353 and 350 BC for Mausolus of Caria and designed by the Greek architects Satyros and Pythius of Priene. The exchange rate with the Turkish Lira makes this attraction incredibly affordable at around $1.00.

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Get 12 bonus freebies with the July issue of Digital Camera mag, including 9 photo tips cards https://maxkol.org/get-12-bonus-freebies-with-the-july-issue-of-digital-camera-mag-including-9-photo-tips-cards/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 09:25:10 +0000 https://maxkol.org/get-12-bonus-freebies-with-the-july-issue-of-digital-camera-mag-including-9-photo-tips-cards/ Digital Camera was launched in 2002 and is the world’s first digital photography magazine. Since then, he has been helping photographers of all skill levels improve their images. Each issue contains tech tips, tutorials, inspiring images and expert buying advice, as well as the latest gear news and reviews, plus a selection of free giveaways […]]]>

Digital Camera was launched in 2002 and is the world’s first digital photography magazine. Since then, he has been helping photographers of all skill levels improve their images.

Each issue contains tech tips, tutorials, inspiring images and expert buying advice, as well as the latest gear news and reviews, plus a selection of free giveaways (see below).

DCam 257 Feature Opener

(Image credit: future)

Modern digital cameras and lenses can capture amazing levels of clarity, and it would be a shame to waste it.

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The Smithsonian selects four possible sites for new museums for women and Latinos https://maxkol.org/the-smithsonian-selects-four-possible-sites-for-new-museums-for-women-and-latinos/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 16:36:45 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-smithsonian-selects-four-possible-sites-for-new-museums-for-women-and-latinos/ The Smithsonian is about to create two new museums. Four sites have been announced as possible locations for the National Museum of the Latino American and the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum. The Board of Regents, the Smithsonian’s governing body, announced the venues on Wednesday. They are: The Arts and Industries Building – […]]]>

The Smithsonian is about to create two new museums. Four sites have been announced as possible locations for the National Museum of the Latino American and the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum.

The Board of Regents, the Smithsonian’s governing body, announced the venues on Wednesday. They are:

  • The Arts and Industries Building – a Smithsonian building on the National Mall next to the castle
  • Northwest Capitol Site – undeveloped land located north of the Capitol Reflecting Pool, under the jurisdiction of the United States Capitol
  • South Monument Site – undeveloped land across the National Mall from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service
  • Tidal Basin Site – undeveloped land bordered by Raoul Wallenberg Place SW and Maine Avenue SW, under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service

Both museums were authorized by Congress in 2020, but efforts to create them have been ongoing for decades.

A campaign to create a Smithsonian museum dedicated to Latinos has been active since 2004. President George W. Bush established a commission to study a Latino museum in 2008. The Smithsonian recently opened ¡Present! A Latin History of the United States. As NPR’s Miranda Mazariegos recently reported, the exhibit is a “small but dynamic” preview of the future Latino museum.

A bill to create a commission to study a Smithsonian museum dedicated to women’s history was introduced in 1998. Currently, the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum is a digital site.

Each site will now go through an evaluation process that will assess, among other things, a building’s capacity, views, accessibility, environmental concerns and “opportunity for architectural expression”, according to a press release from the Smithsonian.

“It’s a complex process,” Jorge Zamanillo, founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the Latin American, told NPR. Also time consuming. Using the National Museum of African American History and Culture as a guide, Zamanillo says, “We know it’s been over a decade of fundraising and design building and all of that stuff. He estimates that the two new museums will open in about 10 to 12 years.

“Selecting a site is one of the most important decisions for a museum,” says Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch III. He presided over the creation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

To decide on the final four sites, the Smithsonian conducted surveys and consulted with civic groups, government leaders, artists and educators, among others. “It is important that the steps we take ensure a transparent, inclusive and thorough process,” Bunch said.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.


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The first social housing project by MAD architectes includes a floating park https://maxkol.org/the-first-social-housing-project-by-mad-architectes-includes-a-floating-park/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 17:18:13 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-first-social-housing-project-by-mad-architectes-includes-a-floating-park/ a micro-district of social housing in beijing MAD Architects presents its very first social housing project, baptized Baiziwan, in its hometown of Beijing. The expansive development comprises twelve residential buildings that meander together through the site, all connected by a web-like network of elevated walkways and “floating park”. The book is the culmination of an […]]]>

a micro-district of social housing in beijing

MAD Architects presents its very first social housing project, baptized Baiziwan, in its hometown of Beijing. The expansive development comprises twelve residential buildings that meander together through the site, all connected by a web-like network of elevated walkways and “floating park”. The book is the culmination of an eight-year research study on social housing by the studio’s founder, Ma Yansong, which particularly focused on the historical development and design of social housing in various countries.

The project is located near the Chinese capital’s central business district and is divided into six blocks, with its divisions informed by the surrounding urban network. This strategy forms a micro-district still integrated into the community.

image by ArchExist

a floating park of common areas

MAD architects organize the Baiziwan social housing project as an open and vertical neighborhood including common outdoor spaces. At street level, the neighborhood is accessible to the public, while the second level reserves park spaces for residents only. This elevated park weaves between the six blocks and incorporates a sports hall, community gardens, badminton court, children’s play area, eco-sanctuary and communal support services.

The development further incorporates staggered half-stories and semi-open gray spaces of varying scales. The team ensures that the ground floor, second-level park, and rooftop all incorporate green coverage so residents can enjoy a strong connection to nature and the outdoors throughout the neighborhood.

Architects crazy about social housingimage by CreatAR Images

the new topography of mad architects: a mountain range in beijing

Accommodating 4,000 apartments – with 3,000 families already moved in – the social housing project by MAD architects takes the form of a Y-shaped set of buildings. Together, the stepped geometries suggest a new mountainous topography in its urban context. Intermediate spaces form intimate, semi-enclosed areas that create a sense of community across the large human-scale site. From afar, the simple white facades and the mountainous profile look like a natural relief in the city’s skyline.

“The 4,000 residential units in the project are made up of six general typologies and three ultra-low energy consumption typologies, covering areas of 40 square meters, 50 square meters and 60 square meters. Lightweight coated panels are used as partitions between rooms, allowing ease of maintenance and flexibility for decoration by residents.

Architects crazy about social housing
Xia Zhi’s photo

sun-drenched living spaces

The Y-shaped footprint of the buildings has been carefully shaped to best ensure the penetration of natural sunlight into each living space. ‘With the plot ratio of 3.5 and the height limit of 80 meters, the high density has led to many restrictions on the general layout for calculating the daylight of each unit,‘ notes the team. The branched building form resulted, incorporating common corridors along the north face of each building to improve sun exposure in the residential units.

Architects crazy about social housingphoto of Zhu Yumeng

prefabrication and durability

MAD Architects’ clients had demanded that more than 80% of the building’s components be prefabricated offsite, resulting in a more environmentally friendly construction. This method of prefabrication proved to be a better quality of housing as each unit was completed in a controlled and systematized process. The architects note that two of the twelve buildings operate with ultra-low energy consumption. These two passive buildings require low heating and cooling loads and experienced a 90% reduction in energy consumption compared to the other ten buildings.

Architects crazy about social housing

image by CreatAR images

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Vivian Maier: Anthology review – the attentive and intimate images behind the myth | Photography https://maxkol.org/vivian-maier-anthology-review-the-attentive-and-intimate-images-behind-the-myth-photography/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/vivian-maier-anthology-review-the-attentive-and-intimate-images-behind-the-myth-photography/ IDuring her lifetime, while working as a nanny in New York and Chicago and living an intensely private existence, Vivian Maier simultaneously created approximately 150,000 photographs, her other life unknown even to those who employed her. Unsurprisingly, given the creative canonization that followed the discovery of her archive in 2007, Vivian Maier’s mythos have tended […]]]>

IDuring her lifetime, while working as a nanny in New York and Chicago and living an intensely private existence, Vivian Maier simultaneously created approximately 150,000 photographs, her other life unknown even to those who employed her. Unsurprisingly, given the creative canonization that followed the discovery of her archive in 2007, Vivian Maier’s mythos have tended to receive as much, if not more, attention than her actual images. This skilfully curated exhibition, comprising only 140 photographs, helps to correct this imbalance.

Anthology highlights the range of Maier’s work – street scenes, snatched portraits and playful self-portraits as well as formal architectural studies, urban still lifes and angular close-ups of arms, torsos, skin and fabric – but also her eye for moments of quiet intimacy or daydreaming. Sometimes she seems so close to her subjects that you want to know what happened right after they heard her shutter click. Often, one or two individuals are held in her attention, frozen in the hustle and bustle of the street and bathed in shadow and light: a young woman in profile, her face veiled, appears both glamorous and mysterious as if she was going out of a black film; two women, both draped in fox fur stoles, taken from behind while deep in conversation; a dashing, hair-dressed young man stares intently at a pigeon that has landed, wings outstretched, on his hand to peck at a bag of birdseed.

‘Presciently conceptual’: Self-portrait, New York, 1953.

At other times, she films from high up in the streets, focusing on the widescreen play of body silhouettes against the angles and railings of mid-century modernist Manhattan. She seems to have embraced each new challenge, or perhaps anticipated the changing nature of the medium as it moved from simple documentary to something more expressively exuberant. When, for example, she began using color film in the late 1950s, her approach became looser, more playful, as if fascinated by the rich hues and deep, painterly tones as much as by the subject matter.

Born in New York City in 1926 to European immigrant parents, Maier was clearly an instinctive, insular and reserved outsider, but totally driven by her vocation. As a photographer, she was removed from, but constantly alert to, the myriad small human dramas of the modernist city. That said, she was neither a detached photographer nor a predator, her quiet focus placing her in the creative company of people like Helen Levitt, rather than more confrontational street photographers such as Garry Winogrand.

The fact that Maier often brought her young proteges with her when she photographed may have added to her anonymity on the streets. The children must surely have been bound by a vow of omertà because, like the documentary Finding Vivian Maier attests, even those who thought they knew her were surprised at the audacity of her clandestine creative life. Most striking perhaps, in terms of our fame-obsessed contemporary culture, was his complete lack of interest in exhibiting his work, let alone embracing the attention that might have come with that kind of exposure. His achievement seems to have been accomplishment enough and has undoubtedly brought its own kind of solitary freedom.

Chicago, 1956, which foreshadows “the kind of large-format paintings” created by Thomas Struth three decades later.
Chicago, 1956, which foreshadows “the kind of large-format paintings” created by Thomas Struth three decades later.

This distillation of his work creates a powerful feeling of an artist on a journey of discovery entirely of his own making. Perhaps the most dramatic creative leap occurred when Maier began photographing in color and moved from the imposed formalism of a twin-lens Rolleiflex camera, held at waist height, to the freedom of a 35mm Leica with viewfinder. . The tell-tale details that have drawn her throughout her career suddenly become more playful and textured: a woman’s legs stretched out on a brightly painted park bench; a close-up of a woman’s waist, from which hang two handbags, one embossed with faux leaves, the other filled with brightly colored flowers. Even more startling is a formal study of an elegantly dressed woman and two children standing in a Chicago art gallery, which foreshadows the kind of large format formal paintings that Thomas Struth began to produce in famous museums three decades later. late.

Maier’s portraits of children can only be intriguing, given his daily work. As contemporary British photographer Vanessa Winship notes in a wall text, they tend to be “unwaveringly direct.” An example is a posed portrait of a young girl standing with her arms crossed in front of a shop window, her gaze so intent that it takes a moment to notice her dirt-streaked face and tear-filled eyes. It is a complex image, haunting and haunting, vulnerable yet provocative.

Most of the time, Maier photographed children as she photographed adults: as themselves, without artifice or sentimentality. They often inhabit the same urban environment, long gone, as their hardened parents: messy streets and sidewalks, buildings and urban wastelands, where they pose, play and gaze suspiciously or stoically at the strange, straight-featured lady. with the camera.

September 18, 1962.
September 18, 1962.

It seems oddly fitting, if somewhat out of place, that the odd straight-featured lady with the camera also occasionally appears in the artwork. His self-portraits are by turns mischievous, conniving, almost ghostly and sly, presciently conceptual. It’s as if she were saying, “Here I am, hidden in plain sight.

In many ways, Maier was a woman apart and decidedly ahead of her time, entering the frame with a quiet assurance that may also, come to think of it, have underpinned her cheerful indifference to any form of recognition or acknowledgment. acknowledgement. Isn’t that, in itself, a supreme form of self-confidence?

At some point, around the start of the new millennium, Maier stopped working, plagued by financial difficulties. Homeless for a time, she was cared for by a family who had once hired her as a nanny. His archives languished in a warehouse until they were sold to pay mounting rent arrears. She died, unnoticed and unrecognized, in 2009 at the age of 83, just two years after the discovery of her vast body of work and the start of her ongoing canonization. The arc of her extraordinary life lends itself all too easily to romantic tragedy, but, judging by her rich and varied oeuvre, Vivian Maier has never doubted her own artistic worth. She just did it her way.

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Inside the story of SCAD’s Provençal campus in the French village of Lacoste – SURFACE https://maxkol.org/inside-the-story-of-scads-provencal-campus-in-the-french-village-of-lacoste-surface/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:45:13 +0000 https://maxkol.org/inside-the-story-of-scads-provencal-campus-in-the-french-village-of-lacoste-surface/ must know The Savannah College of Art and Design celebrates 20 years of excellence in design education at its French satellite campus. by Jesse Dorris June 16, 2022 Library of the SCAD Rue du Four. All photographs courtesy of SCAD. … In 1979, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) opened in Georgia and […]]]>

must know

The Savannah College of Art and Design celebrates 20 years of excellence in design education at its French satellite campus.

by Jesse Dorris

June 16, 2022

Library of the SCAD Rue du Four. All photographs courtesy of SCAD.

In 1979, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) opened in Georgia and quickly established its eponymous coastal city as a global design destination. In 2002, the college similarly transformed the medieval French village of Lacoste. Bathed in the famous light of Provence, the campus comprises 16e-century farmhouses (one of which was used as a gambling den by the infamous Marquis de Sade), medieval caves, existing bakeries and the region’s first art conservatory created by American painter Bernard Pfriem . SCAD President and Founder Paula Wallace oversaw the curatorial team and was awarded a Chevalier in the Order of Academic Palms for her work. SCAD Lacoste is now home to two immersive programs, Pre-Bee and After SCAD, an artist residency for graduates, The SCAD Alumni Atelier, and has hosted everyone from Pierre Cardin to Carrie Mae Weems for talks and master classes .

This year, SCAD Lacoste celebrates its 20th anniversary. The university will inaugurate two additions to the campus, and in October the campus sculpture garden, SCAD Lacoste Promenade de Sculptures, will feature ten permanent outdoor installations from the SCAD community. The Lacoste campus offers a rich program, even in summer. On June 27, SCAD FASH will inaugurate “Azzedine Alaïa: The Art of Fashion”, which is the first exhibition of the work of the late master couturier in Provence. From July 1 to 4, the SCAD Lacoste Film Festival will take place, with a special tribute to Agnès Varda and the awarding of the SCAD Etoile for lifetime achievement to actor Jeremy Irons.

In the following conversation, which has been edited and condensed for clarity, Wallace recounts Surface how to bring 21St-the technology of the century in 10e-century structures, the promise of adaptive reuse and the pleasure of outside.

Fashion classes at the SCAD Lacoste campus.

How did the SCAD make the decision to open a campus in Lacoste?

SCAD Lacoste started in 2002. The former Lacoste School of the Arts had heard of SCAD’s mastery of historic preservation and adaptive reuse, and they approached us about taking over their Lacoste campus because their enrollment had dropped dramatically . They needed help and came to SCAD – and we saw an opportunity to establish a permanent study location abroad, where students and faculty could live and work in the environment perhaps the most inspiring on the planet.

SCAD Lacoste welcomes students, graduates and guests to a dreamscape of Roman ruins, medieval stonework and fields of lavender and poppies – an idyll that has inspired some of the world’s most beloved artists and designers. What did Mark Twain say in The Innocents Abroad? “You have to travel to learn.” Studies show that travel infuses the traveler with curiosity and confidence. Students who travel tend to be more motivated and open to new ideas. Lacoste offers the perfect staging for our bees to spread their wings, see the world and meet new people, all with the guidance and support of our renowned faculty.

A theater on campus.

Preserving the character of the village must have been more difficult than simply retaining the facades and updating the interiors; What do you think SCAD has done particularly well to ensure that the historical identity of the region is not lost?

The most loved spaces resemble living organisms. They are teeming with life, full of light, color and above all, people. At SCAD, we love the stories of old buildings and add our own stories to them with verve and passion. When we arrived in Lacoste, the buildings entrusted to us by the Lacoste School of Arts were in a state of deterioration and dilapidation. Many structures were only a few centuries old (young by European standards), while others dated back to the 10e century.

We got to work and have been building and improving the SCAD Lacoste built environment for 20 years. We have meticulously restored the exteriors of each SCAD Lacoste building to speak to the vernacular design of the Luberon. Aside from a small sign here and there helping students and guests navigate the vertiginous village, the facades and silhouettes of our Lacoste properties are an integral part of the visual language of the village. You can barely tell the difference between a private residence, a student residence, a Lacoste shopSCAD, for example, or school buildings.

The interiors are another story. We rework and reimagine historic interiors to meet the needs of students. adaptive rehabilitation. SCAD students, alumni and faculty need fast Wi-Fi and Ethernet access. The studios are located to take advantage of the beautiful light of the Luberon. We fill Lacoste SCAD classrooms with the technology demanded by the more than 40 SCAD disciplines: 3D printers, photographic printers, HD cameras, Cintiq tablets and everything in between.

We’ve also incorporated many of the unique existing features and eccentricities of Lacoste interiors into cheerful references to previous residents: old beehive ovens turned into cozy reading nooks, a stone sink fitted with a top that can be used as a dining table, extra, a manger topped with glass to make a buffet. Keeping pieces of the past and moving them into the present. As the French say, “Who does not advance, retreats” (“Who does not advance, retreats”). We embraced Lacoste’s historic identity, lifting it out of the ground and ruins as we rebuilt, transformed and replanted.

The interior of the Lower House. Photograph by Adam Kuehl.

Of course, we must mention the Marquis de Sade. What remains of the farm that was once his gambling den? What is it for now?

Ah, yes, the Lower House! The old farmhouse and its outbuildings, which sit at the base of the village, have existed in one form or another for at least eight centuries. When the building was saved and donated to SCAD many years ago by the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, its only history was that of eons and eras of decay. It had no roof. All that remained of its former life as a farm and stable was the old oven and a few stone walls.

We conducted a site survey. We engaged professors and students of preservation design and architectural history from SCAD, as part of their SCAD Lacoste courses, to research, write and publish the history of the site and structure. SCAD is a research university, after all, devoted to applied discovery and its implications for the creative professions. The research helped us understand how the design and function of the building changed over the centuries, which then allowed SCAD to reuse the structure – after adding a few extra walls and roof! – into a residence with classrooms, a dining room and guest rooms. A stunningly contemporary cinema and screening room now live inside what was once a barn. There’s a swimming pool, complete with a few oversized swans that once used to ride in an amusement park, for a little whimsy.

A notable feature is the holes in the walls which held mulberry branches and occupied silkworms in earlier times. We left the holes as a reminder of the farm’s previous function as a silk producer. And when finishing the floor, we found rubble, remains of a Roman temple. It’s so beautiful that we’ve lit it up and covered it in glass so everyone can see it under our feet. There are also several cisterns that are part of artists’ studios, lit and kept behind glass as dramatic visual elements.

The swimming pool outside the Maison Basse.

Interior of the Lower House. Photograph by Adam Kuehl.

Over the decades, what has surprised you about the way students and buildings interact at SCAD Lacoste?

Lacoste sits on a hill above the Luberon valley and, like so many European villages built on rolling alpine terrain, the buildings are full of surprising angles, nooks, narrow staircases and breathtaking views . The front door can be one story, the back door two or three stories higher. It’s anything but boring. I’m sure you’ve experienced the numbing fluorescence of so many poorly designed learning environments at other colleges: the drab architecture, the drab classrooms, the bare walls.

Generally, people expect college classrooms to be dark and gloomy, assuming that truth should be inversely proportional to beauty. Here’s the real truth: the more time our students want to spend at SCAD and in SCAD buildings, the more they learn – and they spend A LOT of time in SCAD classrooms and studios! During the academic year, a SCAD student spends 450 hours in our classrooms (at least!) and 1,000 hours on our premises, and that includes SCAD Lacoste. Because students spend a lot of time in our buildings, we’ve designed warm, cozy environments (lots of soft furnishings and inviting textures) that are very TikTok-worthy, filled with artwork that excites the senses. and arouse curiosity.

Photograph by Chia Chong.

How has Covid changed how buildings function and the campus itself?

Modern buildings – from the last 40 or 50 years, say – look claustrophobic, with windows that don’t open and barely a porch or pocket garden to speak of. Older buildings are often more humane than new ones, with their soaring ceilings and abundant light, verandas and sleepy porches and balconies. These buildings seek light and air and draw them inside. We all needed lots of air and light during the pandemic!

COVID-19 has also reminded everyone how valuable time outdoors can be. I chose each SCAD location, in part, for its climate. SCAD students prioritize their own well-being and love to lay down a blanket and relax or paint outside. Closeness to nature nourishes the soul and the body. Speaking of outdoors, the Lacoste buildings, when they were built, certainly had no heating or air conditioning. Thus, the fresh air so often recommended these days was strictly. And when the mistral arrives, hang on to your hat! Pure, fresh air from the Alps blows through Lacoste all year round, which explains the atmosphere of golden light for which the region is known.

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DALL-E 2 uses descriptions to produce images, but is it art? https://maxkol.org/dall-e-2-uses-descriptions-to-produce-images-but-is-it-art/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:00:45 +0000 https://maxkol.org/dall-e-2-uses-descriptions-to-produce-images-but-is-it-art/ A picture can be worth a thousand words, but thanks to an artificial intelligence program called DALL-E 2, you can have a professional-looking picture with a lot less. DALL-E 2 is a new neural network algorithm that creates an image from a short phrase or phrase that you provide. The program, which was announced by […]]]>

A picture can be worth a thousand words, but thanks to an artificial intelligence program called DALL-E 2, you can have a professional-looking picture with a lot less.

DALL-E 2 is a new neural network algorithm that creates an image from a short phrase or phrase that you provide. The program, which was announced by artificial intelligence research lab OpenAI in April 2022, has not been made public. But a small and growing number of people – myself included – have had access to experimentation.

As a researcher studying the connection between technology and art, I was eager to see how well the program worked. After hours of experimentation, it is clear that DALL-E, while not without flaws, is a step ahead of existing image generation technology. This raises immediate questions about how these technologies will change the way art is made and consumed. It also raises questions about what it means to be creative when DALL-E 2 seems to automate much of the creative process itself.

A Staggering Range of Styles and Subjects

OpenAI researchers built DALL-E 2 from a huge collection of images with captions. They collected some of the images online and licensed others.

Using DALL-E 2 is a lot like searching the web for an image: you type a short phrase into a text box and it returns six images.

But instead of being pulled from the web, the program creates six new images, each reflecting a version of the entered phrase. (Until recently, the program produced 10 images per prompt.) For example, when friends and I gave DALL-E 2 the text prompt “cats in devo hats”, he produced 10 images which came in different styles.

Almost all of them could plausibly pass for professional photographs or drawings. While the algorithm didn’t quite grasp the “Devo hat” – the strange helmets worn by the New Wave Devo group – the headgear in the images it produced came close.

In recent years, a small community of artists have used neural network algorithms to produce art. Many of these works of art have distinctive qualities that almost look like real pictures, but with strange distortions of space – a kind of cyberpunk cubism. Newer text-to-image systems often produce dreamlike, fantastical images that may be delightful but rarely seem real.

DALL-E 2 offers a significant leap in image quality and realism. He can also imitate specific styles with remarkable precision. If you want images that look like real photographs, this will produce six realistic images. If you want prehistoric cave paintings of Shrek, this will generate six images of Shrek as if drawn by a prehistoric artist.

It’s amazing that an algorithm can do this. Each set of images takes less than a minute to generate. Not all images will be pleasing to the eye or necessarily reflect what you had in mind. But, even with the need to sift through lots of outputs or try different text prompts, there’s no other way to get so many results so quickly, not even by hiring an artist. And, sometimes, unexpected results are the best.

In principle, anyone with enough resources and expertise can create a system like this. Google Research recently announced an impressive similar text-to-image conversion system, and an independent developer is publicly developing their own version that anyone can try right now on the web, although it’s still not as good as DALL- E or Google’s system.

It’s easy to imagine these tools transforming the way people create images and communicate, whether through memes, greeting cards, advertising and, yes, art.

Where’s the art in that?

At first I had a moment using DALL-E 2 to generate different types of paintings, in all different styles – like “Odilon Redon painting from Seattle” – when I realized it was better than any any paint algorithm I’ve ever developed. Then I realized that he is, in a way, a better painter than me.

In fact, no human being can do what DALL-E 2 does: create such a wide range of high-quality images in just seconds. If someone told you that a person created all these images, of course you would say that they were creative.

But that does not make DALL-E 2 an artist. Even though it sometimes looks like magic, under the hood it is still a computer algorithm, which strictly follows the instructions of the algorithm authors at OpenAI.

If these images succeed as art, they are a product of how the algorithm was designed, the images it was trained on, and more importantly, how the artists use it.

You might be inclined to say that there is little artistic value in an image produced by a few keystrokes. But in my opinion, this line of thinking echoes the classic idea that photography can’t be art because a machine has done all the work. Today, the human authorship and craftsmanship involved in fine art photography is recognized, and critics understand that the best photography involves more than just pushing a button.

Even so, we often discuss artworks as if they came directly from the artist’s intent. The artist intended to show something, or express an emotion, and so he created this image. DALL-E 2 seems to shorten this process entirely: you have an idea, you grab it, and you’re done.

But when I paint the old-fashioned way, I found that my paintings came from the exploratory process, not just from executing my initial goals. And this is true for many artists.

Take Paul McCartney, who coined the track “Get Back” during a jam session. He didn’t start with a plan for the song; he just started playing the violin and experimenting and the band developed it from there.

Picasso describes his process in the same way: “I don’t know in advance what I’m going to put on the canvas any more than I decide in advance what colors I’m going to use. . . Each time I undertake to paint a picture, I have the feeling of jumping into space.

In my own explorations with DALL-E 2, one idea led to another which led to another, and eventually I found myself in a completely unexpected and magical new land, very far from where I had started.

Incitement as art

I would say that the art, using a system like DALL-E 2, comes not just from the final text prompt, but from the whole creative process leading up to that prompt. Different artists will follow different processes and achieve different results that reflect their own approaches, skills and obsessions.

I started to see my experiments as a set of series, each a cohesive dive into a single theme, rather than a set of stand-alone wacky images.

The ideas for these images and series came from everywhere, often linked by a set of stepping stones. At one point, while making images based on the work of contemporary artists, I wanted to generate a site-specific installation art image in the style of contemporary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. After trying a few unsatisfactory places, I came up with the idea of ​​placing it in La Mezquita, an old mosque and church in Cordoba, Spain. I sent the photo to a fellow architect, Manuel Ladron de Guevara, who is from Córdoba, and we started thinking about other architectural ideas together.

This became a series about imaginary new buildings in different styles of architects.

So I started to see what I was doing with DALL-E 2 as both a form of exploration and an art form, even if it’s often amateur art like the drawings I do. on my iPad.

Indeed, some artists, like ryan murdoch, advocated for prompt-based image-making to be recognized as an art. He points the Helena Sarin, experienced artificial intelligence artist for example.

“When I look at most stuff from Midjourney” – another popular text-to-image conversion system – “a lot of it will be interesting or funny,” Murdoch told me in an interview. “But with [Sarin’s] work, there is a direct line. It’s easy to see that she put a lot of thought into it and worked on the craft, as the result is more visually appealing and interesting, and follows her style continuously.

Working with DALL-E 2, or one of the new text-to-image conversion systems, means learning its quirks and developing strategies to avoid common pitfalls. It’s also important to be aware of its potential harms, such as its reliance on stereotyping and potential uses for misinformation. By using DALL-E 2 you will also discover surprising correlations, like how everything becomes old when you use the style of an old painter, filmmaker or photographer.

When I want to do something very specific, DALL-E 2 often can’t do it. The results would require a lot of difficult manual editing afterwards. It’s when my goals are vague that the process is most enjoyable, providing surprises that lead to new ideas which in turn lead to more ideas and so on.

Likewise, the artist Mario Klingemann architectural renderings with the tents of the homeless could be considered a replica of my architectural renderings of whimsical dream homes.

It is too early to judge the importance of this art form. I keep thinking of a line from the excellent book “Art in the Post-Culture” – “The dominant aesthetic of AI is novelty”.

This would surely be true, to some extent, for any new technology used for art. The Lumière brothers’ early films in the 1890s were novelties, not cinematic masterpieces; it amazed people to see images moving at all.

AI art software is developing so rapidly that there is continuous technical and artistic novelty. It’s as if, every year, there’s an opportunity to explore an exciting new technology, each one more powerful than the last, and each one seemingly poised to transform art and society.

Aaron Hertzmann is an Affiliate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Washington.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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See the Shades of Hyderabad in These 7 Street Photography Spots https://maxkol.org/see-the-shades-of-hyderabad-in-these-7-street-photography-spots/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 10:44:44 +0000 https://maxkol.org/see-the-shades-of-hyderabad-in-these-7-street-photography-spots/ Vintage markets, royal landmarks and vibrant art districts – the city of pearls’ versatility makes for intriguing snapshots. If you love street photography, we have compiled a list of the best places to go in Hyderabad. An unmistakable spirit of yesteryear, laid-back lifestyle and mouth-watering traditional cuisine (haleem, anyone?) underscores Hyderabad. This gives the city […]]]>

Vintage markets, royal landmarks and vibrant art districts – the city of pearls’ versatility makes for intriguing snapshots. If you love street photography, we have compiled a list of the best places to go in Hyderabad.

An unmistakable spirit of yesteryear, laid-back lifestyle and mouth-watering traditional cuisine (haleem, anyone?) underscores Hyderabad. This gives the city a certain charm that few other places in the country can claim. You could spend hours hopping from its modern breweries to period landmarks, exploring everything the guidebooks list in elaborate itineraries.

However, if you are looking for something a little more personal and atypical, we have compiled a list of the best street photography spots in Hyderabad. Head to them to familiarize yourself with and capture the myriad moods that underscore each lane and location here. From tourist destinations to local favorites, this will ensure that your visit to the city will be unforgettable.

Best Street Photography Spots in Hyderabad

Charminar

We start this list with, perhaps, the city’s most iconic destination. Over 400 years old, the Four Towers Monument is a must visit, not only for its architectural beauty, but also for the market, mosques and restaurants that surround it. Not to mention, there is a flurry of activity around him every day, which continues late into the night. Locals go there to buy a host of things, including bracelets, shoes, traditional perfume (attar), metal shoulder bags and more! Walk further and you might come across a few colorful houses that are worth capturing.

You’ll also find plenty of people over a meal at the many Iranian restaurants here. Expect to drown in a sea of ​​people come evening, and prepare to capture starry-eyed tourists, bargain cases and heartwarming laughter over cups of chai. At night you can experiment with light photography or explore all the little ice cream shops that line the area. For the most exciting shots, head here during Eid or Ramzan. That aside, there’s no better place than the Old City to explore the royal lineage (Nizami) of Hyderabad.

Maqta Art District

Few tourists have explored this part of Hyderabad, although locals rave about it to anyone who listens. And for good reason! A quaint street in Khairatabad, this spot features colorful murals that spring from the narrow lanes and splash the towering buildings. These magical spaces are courtesy of India’s largest street art foundation, St+Art India, which turns parts of different cities into works of art.

Vibrant and thriving, this place provides the most exciting canvas for your street photography stories. You’ll find plenty of influencers in their next viral snap, kids playing cricket and other explorers visiting this part of town. Walk past the entrance, marked by black and white signage, and explore the celebration of colors that greets you – from the green walls to the blue square. You are bound to be delighted by the gain.

Gudimalkapur Flower Market

Every street photographer’s delight, a flower market is a perfect space to capture the rush of street animals and cows, the dew that settles on the petals and the myriad of emotions that sparkle on the faces of the locals and vendors when they come across a bargain. This one in particular offers all of that and more.

The market features every possible flower – from roses to daisies – imaginable for sale, with some vendors carrying them up to 50 kilometers away. These then proceed to mosques, temples, funerals and other places in the city. Stick around to capture vendors refreshing their wares with water and stringing together multiple flowers to make garlands. And to really amp up the energy of your shots, head here on occasions like Diwali, Christmas or Valentine’s Day when the crowds are at their heaviest.

Bazaar of Jumerat

Right next to the Flower Festival is this flea market that has been around for over 80 years and opens every Thursday like clockwork. At dawn, the streets of the area between the Muslim Jung Bridge and the Purana Bridge (purana pul) are teeming with hawkers and vendors selling everything from safety pins to bicycles.

Capture those being sold and set up for purchase, explore the alleys for trinkets and interesting stories, and find time to interact with vendors (and a few customers), many of whom come from different parts of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh to settle.

Road Necklace

Another popular spot in Hyderabad, street photography here would involve capturing locals perched on park benches, lounging in restaurants, and walking hand-in-hand along Hussain Sagar Lake. Many also pass by this spot for their morning jog, plan picnics around the parks here, or descend for ice cream by the waters late at night. Balloon vendors and street stalls are also a common feature here.

This is where Hyderabad’s more metropolitan energy resides, despite an unmistakable nostalgic charm attached to the place. You can walk around the parks through NTR Gardens, Lumbini Park and Sanjeevaiah Park or capture vendors spending their day, closer to the lake. At night, the shimmering skyline with the silhouettes of buildings in the distance is worth capturing.

The same goes for people who enjoy the boat rides, the illuminated Buddha statue and the flurry of people returning after a long day. Once you’ve had enough, you can take to the streets to get up close to the food served in snack-sized portions and capture every detail. Stick around for sunset if you get there early, it’s one of the best spots for that in the city.

Shilparamam

This arts and crafts village of Madhapur is frequented by locals for handicrafts, jewelry, sarees, quaint bowls and other unique trinkets. It was first created to preserve traditional craftsmanship and now hosts a series of festivals and other events throughout the year. Head here for a vibrant backdrop for your snaps as you capture people shopping or haggling over wooden horses and terracotta mugs. Some people even stop by to get their fortunes told or have their hands tattooed with henna. And with a small entrance fee, there’s no reason not to take a little stroll around this place. Head here on a busy weekend to find more intriguing subjects.

Monda Market

Rounding out this list is another thriving market, this time with mostly fruit and vegetables on display. Crowds of locals flock there for fresh produce and bargains, especially palm fruits and water chestnuts. And as you experience its bustle, you’ll discover plenty to capture, from the fruit itself to the energy of the vendors. Walk a little further and you will find many perfumeries also selling scented essence in colored glass bottles. Not to mention that the surrounding lanes are home to old world houses that date back 80 years and are colorful and full of character. Head here early in the morning to watch the light play along the pile of potatoes and tomatoes.

Featured and hero image: Courtesy of @nanifangirl/Instagram

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Saint Vincent Photo Exhibit Reveals the Private Side of Monastic Life https://maxkol.org/saint-vincent-photo-exhibit-reveals-the-private-side-of-monastic-life/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 20:20:05 +0000 https://maxkol.org/saint-vincent-photo-exhibit-reveals-the-private-side-of-monastic-life/ Among the lesser-known works of famed 20th-century photographer, author and filmmaker Gordon Parks is a series of photos taken for a 1955 “Life” magazine photo essay documenting life among the monks of St. Benedict’s Abbey in Atchison, Kan. Parks’ 30 photos will be paired with the work of Pittsburgh-based photographer Dominick McDuffie in an exhibit […]]]>

Among the lesser-known works of famed 20th-century photographer, author and filmmaker Gordon Parks is a series of photos taken for a 1955 “Life” magazine photo essay documenting life among the monks of St. Benedict’s Abbey in Atchison, Kan.

Parks’ 30 photos will be paired with the work of Pittsburgh-based photographer Dominick McDuffie in an exhibit called “Worship + Work,” from June 16 through August 16. 19 at the Verostko Center for the Arts at Saint Vincent College.

Parks’ essay, “A Cloistered Life of Devotion,” gave readers insight into the mid-century American Benedictine community by documenting their daily routines of prayer, work, study, leisure, and rest. .

McDuffie did the same for modern members of the Benedictine monastery on the Unity campus.

Growing up in Kansas City, Andrew Julo, curator and director of the Verostko Center, was familiar with Parks’ collection of pictures from the Abbey, as they had been framed in a gallery where he once worked. He had also visited Saint Benedict on an educational outing with his Catholic elementary school.

Julo contacted the Abbey for a loan of the photos, proposing an exchange of works from the Saint Vincent collection.

He met McDuffie at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, where the 28-year-old photographer ran a workshop in tandem with the museum’s Teenie Harris Archive, and offered him a commission to create images for “Worship + Work.”

“There are parallels between Parks and Dominick, given that they both started photographing in their twenties, they both got their first cameras from a pawn shop, and they were both self-taught,” Julo said.

McDuffie specializes in documenting underrepresented communities.

“(Parks) was one of my first steps into photography, learning about his work and also being a black photographer,” said McDuffie, who has a residency at Boom Concepts Studios and the Artist Resource Center in Garfield. “His work is super-iconic. I was a little nervous being in the same space as his work, but it put pressure on me to make my images look the best they could.

A different world

McDuffie made long and repeated visits to the monks of Saint Vincent.

“At the beginning, we had a visit and I was able to meet different monks, sit down and have a meal. It was an icebreaker,” he said. “During this time, I was talking to several people and I was going to different areas of the campus. It gave me different perspectives and more opportunities to get some of their stories, their family history and how they became monks.

“It was very interesting because it was a totally different world that I was exposed to.”

By spending time with the monks in their private spaces, Julo said, McDuffie was doing the same thing Parks would have done.

“Part of (McDuffie’s) process was to be a fly on the wall at times in the monastery that people don’t normally see, in places that are essentially off-limits to the public,” Julo said. “He talked about the process of getting to know people, making them feel comfortable around him, which leads to better photos.”

Like Parks, McDuffie worked with a 35mm camera and black and white film, but there was no attempt to imitate the master’s work.

“It’s not a project in which he creates mimesis. He wasn’t trying to create a re-representation, but something that had visual similarities,” Julo said. “Black and white is probably the major continuity.”

“Work + Worship” will kick off with a reception from 4-7 p.m. on June 16 at the Verostko Center on the second floor of the Dale P. Latimer Library.

The exhibit will be open to the public during Verostko Center summer hours, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and by appointment. Visits can be arranged by emailing verostkocenter@stvincent.edu.

When Julo returns the photos of the parks to Saint-Benoît Abbey, he will also provide a loan of 19th-century architectural drawings from the Saint-Vincent collection – two of which actually depict Saint-Benoît.

“There is a system of Jesuit colleges and galleries that communicate with each other, and I’m interested in us having these deeper conversations between the different Benedictine institutions and having more of these exhibits,” he said. . “Everyone has these treasures and interesting things, and it’s good for us to be able to share them and expose them to an audience that wouldn’t normally see them.”

For more information, visit verostkocenter.org.

Shirley McMarlin is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Shirley at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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