Architectural photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 05:59:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://maxkol.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T235614.367-150x150.png Architectural photography – Maxkol http://maxkol.org/ 32 32 The dissonance between the overwhelming American landscape and bland architecture https://maxkol.org/the-dissonance-between-the-overwhelming-american-landscape-and-bland-architecture/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 21:40:49 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-dissonance-between-the-overwhelming-american-landscape-and-bland-architecture/ Daniel Kaven is an American artist working in architecture, painting, film and photography and co-founder of the multidisciplinary design studio William/Kaven Architecture. In Kaven’s new book, Architecture of the Normal, he explores the dissonance between the overwhelming American landscape and the disappointing architecture of its shopping malls, fast food chains, motels and collective housing. Part […]]]>

Daniel Kaven is an American artist working in architecture, painting, film and photography and co-founder of the multidisciplinary design studio William/Kaven Architecture.

In Kaven’s new book, Architecture of the Normal, he explores the dissonance between the overwhelming American landscape and the disappointing architecture of its shopping malls, fast food chains, motels and collective housing. Part travelogue, art book, and architectural survey, the book traces the patterns created by prevailing modes of transportation and examines how we have come to accept the bland, scarred boxes that line America’s streets and highways. .

Beginning with a portrait of ambulatory Native American societies and the introduction of horses by the Spaniards, Kaven discusses the built environment as it has been shaped by trains, cars, planes and rockets, and turns to a future architecture defined by self-driving cars and air taxis. . This highly visual narrative includes many historic photographs and Kaven’s art.

Kaven’s architecture has won numerous awards, including an Architecture MasterPrize; an International Architecture Prize from the European Center for Architecture, Art, Design and Urban Studies; and several honors from the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Brain Magazine

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“the falling lebanon” series by james kerwin https://maxkol.org/the-falling-lebanon-series-by-james-kerwin/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:04:48 +0000 https://maxkol.org/the-falling-lebanon-series-by-james-kerwin/ “The Fall of Lebanon” captures the country’s abandoned architectural gems english photographer James kerwin takes us on a new tour of mansions, palaces and abandoned houses in his latest series titled “Falling Lebanon”. the following images capture the abandoned but striking design of the from the country traditional architecture that has succumbed to neglect and […]]]>

“The Fall of Lebanon” captures the country’s abandoned architectural gems

english photographer James kerwin takes us on a new tour of mansions, palaces and abandoned houses in his latest series titled “Falling Lebanon”. the following images capture the abandoned but striking design of the from the country traditional architecture that has succumbed to neglect and years of conflict. behind these layers of ruin, however, beauty still prevails. as Kerwin says, ‘there is something about the Lebanese mansion. they are impossible to miss because the first thing that attracts you is the romantic exterior. once I discovered a disused or abandoned house, it always filled me with excitement, as I never really knew what was going to be inside. these houses were colorful, fascinating and historic.

all images © james kerwin

discover the traditional 19th century Ottoman-style house

the traditional ottoman style house could be hidden anywhere and in many cities of lebanon. these houses first flourished in the Ottoman era of the 19th century and have a special relationship with nature – usually located in and around scenic landscapes or towns. At first glance, these heritage buildings may look the same, but their unique traits can be discerned more closely. ‘I have found each example of architecture unique, varying also in color palettes, from bright teals and clean whites to soft orange and yellow hues, ‘ elaborates the photographer.

lebanon falling series by james kerwin 9
‘the Lebanese veranda’ | a central hall allowed extended families to live together

on the outside, the Ottoman-style houses are clad in stone, with ocher plaster or similar hues. they feature the signature “triple arch” window design that welcomes sun and light into its interior. fortunately, examples of this architectural style still exist across the country. another striking detail is the high ceilings of the traditional houses, born from the need to cool the rooms during the summer, because they let the breeze pass. meanwhile, a central hall allowed extended families to live together in the same large house. the three large central arched windows eventually evolved and doubled to enjoy panoramic views of the rolling lebanon coast and impressive mountains.

lebanon falling series by james kerwin 8
‘olive grove’ | Lebanese mansion with 360 degree view of the landscape

another of the main attractions of these abandoned houses is the possibility of discovering a magnificent baghdadi ceiling filled with art. the “baghdadi” is the name of the traditional partitions or false ceilings used in these heritage buildings. these intricate aerial aesthetics have filled many homes across the country and have been one of kerwin’s major aesthetic attractions as a photographer.

lebanon falling series by james kerwin 3
‘ivory palace’ | the ground floor of a two-story residence in Beirut

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brenac & gonzalez restores the cafeteria of a French company influenced by Gallo-Roman villas https://maxkol.org/brenac-gonzalez-restores-the-cafeteria-of-a-french-company-influenced-by-gallo-roman-villas/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 15:39:04 +0000 https://maxkol.org/brenac-gonzalez-restores-the-cafeteria-of-a-french-company-influenced-by-gallo-roman-villas/ brenac & gonzalez & associates redesigns the 1983 cafeteria in France brenac & gonzalez & associates (BGA) rethought a shared company cafeteria built by architect and designer Marc held in 1983 as part of the old IBM office complex pompignane, in a small crown of Montpellier, France. the site, which now houses around ten office […]]]>

brenac & gonzalez & associates redesigns the 1983 cafeteria in France

brenac & gonzalez & associates (BGA) rethought a shared company cafeteria built by architect and designer Marc held in 1983 as part of the old IBM office complex pompignane, in a small crown of Montpellier, France. the site, which now houses around ten office buildings scattered around this Mediterranean landscape of 28 hectares, was acquired by the company covivio in 2004 and 2007 with the aim of attracting new technology companies and promote the ‘silicone valley’ of Montpellier. The intervention of BGA in the existing cafeteria has two main components: the rehabilitation of the beautiful heritage on the site, which includes the preservation and restoration of key architectural elements; and the extension of the program with a new building.

all images © Sergio grazia unless otherwise stated

header image © stefan tuchila

EXTENDING EXISTING CONSTRUCTION WHILE PRESERVING HERITAGE

brenac & gonzalez & associates was commissioned to redesign the 1983 building by marc held, whose architecture was heavily influenced by Gallo-Roman villas. the existing construction is organized around two interior patios, the principal being surrounded by a portico of wooden columns and surrounded by walls made up of alternating layers of stone blocks and cobblestones. BGA has preserved the architectural heritage of the site, including the cantilevered frames, Roman tiled roofs, composite perimeter walls, columns, wood carpentry, sandstone paved floor and raw concrete of the original interior structure. Large interstices have also been dug in the peripheral wall to further open up the “bastide” onto the magnificent landscape of the surrounding campus. meanwhile, a hollow dug in part of the central courtyard brings light to the ground floor.

the demolition of the old kitchens, in exposed concrete blocks, made it possible to an extension of the program. BGA built the new volume with a similar system of patios and placed inside a business center, amphitheater, collaborative workspace, offices for local start-ups and fitness and well-being areas. an ‘agora’ – a sunny and linear area – serves as a link between the existing building and the new building, bringing together the different programs. the new building is topped by a series of open-air theaters and green terraces, connected by various ramps. scents of pine, lavender, fig trees and jasmine envelop users in a relaxing atmosphere, bringing them closer to the wider landscape of the region.

brenac & gonzalez restores the cafeteria of a French company influenced by Gallo-Roman villas
the existing construction is organized around two interior patios

brenac & gonzalez restores the cafeteria of a French company influenced by Gallo-Roman villas
outdoor terrace

brenac & gonzalez restores the cafeteria of a French company influenced by Gallo-Roman villasimage © vincent boutin

brenac & gonzalez restores the cafeteria of a French company influenced by Gallo-Roman villas
the new building is topped by a series of open-air theaters and green terraces



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Best lenses for the Canon R5: Great zooms and prime lenses for this high-end camera https://maxkol.org/best-lenses-for-the-canon-r5-great-zooms-and-prime-lenses-for-this-high-end-camera/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:00:39 +0000 https://maxkol.org/best-lenses-for-the-canon-r5-great-zooms-and-prime-lenses-for-this-high-end-camera/ Still relatively new to the scene, the Canon EOS R5 is a full frame mirrorless camera that sits near the top of Canon’s new mirrorless lineup. It can be used with any RF lens and as such there is a range of options available for R5 owners. Most RF lenses are available exclusively from Canon, […]]]>

Still relatively new to the scene, the Canon EOS R5 is a full frame mirrorless camera that sits near the top of Canon’s new mirrorless lineup. It can be used with any RF lens and as such there is a range of options available for R5 owners.

Most RF lenses are available exclusively from Canon, which sells a mix of ultra-wide zooms, prime lenses, and telephoto options. However, there are a handful of other third-party lens manufacturers that provide RF lenses, with others such as Tamron and Sigma aiming to launch RF compatible lenses sometime in 2022.


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Luciano Perna (1958-2021) – Artforum International https://maxkol.org/luciano-perna-1958-2021-artforum-international/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 20:11:46 +0000 https://maxkol.org/luciano-perna-1958-2021-artforum-international/ Concept artist Luciano Perna, known for his typically absurd found object sculptures influenced by Arte Povera and his discreetly evocative photographs, died on December 28 in Los Angeles of a heart attack at the age of 63. The news was confirmed at Los Angeles Times by the artist’s wife, Darcy Huebler. His work through mediums […]]]>

Concept artist Luciano Perna, known for his typically absurd found object sculptures influenced by Arte Povera and his discreetly evocative photographs, died on December 28 in Los Angeles of a heart attack at the age of 63. The news was confirmed at Los Angeles Times by the artist’s wife, Darcy Huebler. His work through mediums such as painting, photography, sculpture and installation defied categorization, his work being variously described as Constructivist, Duchampian, Futurist and Surrealist. In works ranging from a self-portrait including a close-up of a spaghetti strand enlarged to reflect his own size to “Paintings by the Pound,” a group of abstract paintings into which he secreted small weights and billed buyers accordingly. He continually questioned the restrictions surrounding the making of art and its reception.

Perna was born in Naples in 1958. After both parents died within months of each other, he moved to Caracas, Venezuela, at the age of sixteen to live with his older half-brother. There he continued the practice of photography, which he adopted at the age of fourteen under the tutelage of his father, an amateur photographer. After brief stints as an archivist at the National Library of Venezuela and as a photographer in a commercial portrait studio, he moved to Los Angeles and enrolled in CalArts at the age of twenty-one. He then obtained his BA and MA in photography, studying with John Baldessari, Judy Fiskin, Barbara Kruger and Douglas Huebler (the father of his future wife).

Working with humble found objects, Perna often composed objects perceived as masculine (motorcycles, racing cars) from those perceived as feminine or domestic (pots, pans, cups, barbecues). Of particular note is its 1993 Easy Rider, which replicates the iconic chopper ridden by Peter Fonda in the titular 1969 film, with a pair of aluminum crutches forming the bike’s elongated front fork. Perna had never seen the movie, which came out when he was eleven and lived in Naples. “I just saw the photos and imagined what was in the movie,” he said. Bomb‘s David Pagel the year he did the job.

Although he has experimented with various mediums over the course of his career – “What I want to do is best tackled in this weird, unimaginable space that resists definition,” he told Pagel – the photography stuck. a constant. During the Covid-19 lockdown, Perna began photographing plants and other objects in his home against seemingly shallow black backgrounds, the results both bright and elegiac. He posted his efforts daily to his social media accounts, where they caught the attention of many who were previously unfamiliar with his work. Among them was the critic Benjamin HD Buchloh, who developed this work in the pages of Art Forum in the fall of 2020.

An artist who was totally unknown to me seemed to suspend his floral semaphores between alarm and seduction. Alarm, since the random Perna specimens were apparently not singled out solely by concern about the increasingly precarious ecology of plants, threatened with extinction by perpetually diversified political and economic practices of chemical and climatic destruction. , but also by the feeling of an aggravated topicality imagining the dangers to life in general within the framework of the pandemic. Seduction, since these images not only mobilized the capital transhistoric attractions of flora, but also deployed the centuries-old meditative powers of still life to block the paradoxical rush of time under the pandemic’s mind-numbing evacuation of most structured functions. everyday.

Inkjet prints of these works were exhibited at the Marian Goodman Librairie in Paris in 2021. Perna has exhibited extensively in galleries around the world and in museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the contemporary exhibitions from Los Angeles, the Laguna Art Museum and the Santa Monica Museum of Art, all in California; MIT’s List Visual Art Center, Dia Art Foundation, New York; and the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. His work is in the collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Museum of Fine Arts, La Chaux-des-Fonds, Switzerland.

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Courtenay Finn appointed Chief Curator of Orange County Museum of Art https://maxkol.org/courtenay-finn-appointed-chief-curator-of-orange-county-museum-of-art/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 22:17:41 +0000 https://maxkol.org/courtenay-finn-appointed-chief-curator-of-orange-county-museum-of-art/ The Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) yesterday revealed Courtenay Finn’s appointment as chief curator. Finn will assume her new role in March, departing from the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, where she has been curator since 2018. At OCMA, she will lead the curatorial department and oversee the exhibitions taking place in the […]]]>

The Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) yesterday revealed Courtenay Finn’s appointment as chief curator. Finn will assume her new role in March, departing from the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, where she has been curator since 2018. At OCMA, she will lead the curatorial department and oversee the exhibitions taking place in the new home. ‘OCMA, which is scheduled to open in Costa Mesa in October 2022.

OCMA’s new $ 93 million facility will open on October 8 with the California Biennale serving as the inaugural exhibit. General admission will be free to the public for a decade after opening.

“The energy around the museum and in the local creative communities is inspiring,” Finn noted. “I am delighted to be working with the dynamic team at OCMA to create a vibrant curatorial program that continues its long-standing commitment to experimentation, places artists and communities in meaningful dialogue, and explores how art can be an agent of transformation. “

OCMA also announced the appointment of Meagan Burger as Director of Engagement and Learning. Burger, previously responsible for adult learning at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, will lead the development and integration of OCMA’s learning and audience programs and community partnerships.

“I am excited to lead the development of programs and initiatives that will expand and engage our communities, cultivate inclusiveness, spark curiosity and transform traditional narratives,” said Burger.

“Courtenay and Meagan are wonderful additions to the leadership of OCMA, whose work and impact will reflect our vision for a vibrant, engaged and diverse museum for the 21st century,” said OCMA Director and CEO, Heidi Zuckerman, noting that she had worked with the two women at the Aspen Art Museum before entering her role at the California museum last January.

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How I took these vertical panoramic images in the most beautiful churches and cathedrals in the world https://maxkol.org/how-i-took-these-vertical-panoramic-images-in-the-most-beautiful-churches-and-cathedrals-in-the-world/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 17:59:12 +0000 https://maxkol.org/how-i-took-these-vertical-panoramic-images-in-the-most-beautiful-churches-and-cathedrals-in-the-world/ Vertical churches of the world is a project that started in 2012 in New York. It’s been ongoing since then and the project has been featured by numerous news agencies, blogs, and articles around the world (including here on DIYP). I felt now was the time to put some of the pictures in a book, […]]]>

Vertical churches of the world is a project that started in 2012 in New York. It’s been ongoing since then and the project has been featured by numerous news agencies, blogs, and articles around the world (including here on DIYP). I felt now was the time to put some of the pictures in a book, which you can find here, and I thought I would prepare this article to explain a bit how I create them.

When you enter a church, which is mostly Gothic in style due to the long nave, try to find the center of the aisle. If you are lucky enough to be able to use a tripod to photograph, get a little closer to the front of the church altar and try to capture the dome above the altar. If you are shooting by a show of hands, find the same spot closer to the altar. Your objective is to capture the entire church in a panorama vertically from the altar to the narthex (the back of the church) while filming the ceiling along the way.

i use a Nikon 14-24mm 2.8 goal with my Nikon d850. I recommend using a wide angle lens, at least 24mm. Take photos using manual settings so you can change your settings as the light changes. As for the ISO settings, it depends on whether you have the luxury of using a tripod or not. Otherwise, I shoot at ISO 1600 or higher most of the time. The time required is only a few minutes with a tripod and less than a minute for handheld shooting.

When you pan, you need to overlap at least 25% of the previous photo so that Photoshop can blend the photos seamlessly. Your first shot should try to capture as much of the fairway / ground and the same for your last shot. Pull from the altar up towards the center of the ceiling and once you get to the center, physically turn around and pull up to the back of the church.

Don’t worry, when you turn around, Photoshop will know exactly what to do to complete the panorama for you. You should have between 5 and 9 hits in total. If you are using a tripod, simply flip the camera over and pull toward the back of the church.

To do the photo editing tasks, I always start with Lightroom and then move on to Photoshop. Lightroom allows you to get all photos in the same lighting sensation because your photos usually look very different from when you take the photo. Some are darker than others, and Lightroom is a fantastic program to use for aligning lighting differences. Lightroom also helps you straighten your photos, as some shots will sometimes be off-center. Once you have worked on all the shots, use Photoshop for the Panorama (Photomerge) part of the photo.

This part usually takes a while and once it’s done you need to reframe it as you like. I always end up with a 3×1 panoramic format but you can do whatever you want. After the panorama is finished, you may still have things in the photo that you want to correct like lighting, centering the photo when cropping, it may not look straight enough to you, all these issues can be handled in Photoshop .

Things to remember:

  1. Make sure you’ve captured at least 25% of the previous photo
  2. Stay focused to keep your shots centered
  3. Beware of very bright and very dark lit areas of the church and use the appropriate settings accordingly
  4. If shooting handheld, keep your hands steady to avoid lens shake
  5. Ask permission before setting up a tripod so as not to disrespect the church or parishioners
  6. Make sure the church is open on the day you want to turn – several times they are closed

About the Author

Richard Silver is a New York-born travel and architectural photographer who has visited 94 countries and over 350 cities with his camera. He enjoys iconic architecture, both old and modern, and enjoys documenting beautiful structures in every new city he visits. You can read more about Richard at his website, buy his book Vertical churches of the world and find out more about the website of the vertical churches of the world.


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Inauguration of the Shanghai Jiuguang Center of UNStudio https://maxkol.org/inauguration-of-the-shanghai-jiuguang-center-of-unstudio/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 07:30:54 +0000 https://maxkol.org/inauguration-of-the-shanghai-jiuguang-center-of-unstudio/ the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, the largest shopping complex in northern Shanghai, designed by A studio architecture studio in collaboration with Nihon Sekkei, was recently completed and inaugurated. The two companies worked together to create a structure that could also fulfill a social role and become a point of reference not only for clients-consumers, but also […]]]>

the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, the largest shopping complex in northern Shanghai, designed by A studio architecture studio in collaboration with Nihon Sekkei, was recently completed and inaugurated. The two companies worked together to create a structure that could also fulfill a social role and become a point of reference not only for clients-consumers, but also for the community. Architect Ben van berkel of the UNStudio, during the presentation of the project for the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, highlighted the social role played by this type of building in China. Not just a retail complex, but public spaces serving the city, where culture and commerce meet and where architecture fulfills a larger function.
the Shanghai Jiuguang Center was built in a bustling area of ​​Shanghai, with an architectural firm Nihon sekkei design the outer shell and A studio design all the interior spaces of the shopping center, including the central courtyard and its facades, as well as the public roof terrace.
The user experience, understood both as a shopping experience and as an interaction with the different spaces, was the main concept for the development of the project. The outer layer of the complex resembles a protective shell that opens inward to reveal a fluid and luminous experience. Paths and emotions converge in the central core, a full height courtyard designed as an interior landscaped space. The great central void thus appears as a pearl of light, an effect enhanced by the ceramic tile cladding of the courtyard facade, which takes on dynamic pearly reflections when lit by the sun. The full-height empty space allows for cross-sectional views and visually connects all levels of the complex, which are interconnected by flowing escalators and a panoramic staircase crossing the central void.
Equipped with green spaces and seating integrated into the structure, the courtyard is a pleasant meeting and resting place that users can enjoy at any time of the day, while also hosting events relevant to the mall or the community. Distributed around the perimeter of the courtyard, and connected to it by projecting balconies and ribbon windows, are three internal voids. The materials and finishes chosen for each void define three different identities corresponding to three different business themes running vertically through the complex: the “urban playground“where lights and colors evoke the dynamism of the metropolis,”the urban oasis“where warm colors are inspired by nature, and finally”urban walkway“in which dark, shiny materials recreate the city’s nocturnal atmosphere. The ceiling incorporates an element that allows users to easily navigate, indicating service areas and vertical connections (elevators and escalators) located next to voids.

(Agnese Bifulco)

Images courtesy of A studio, photos by © Aaron & Rex

Project name: Shanghai Jiuguang Center
Client: Lifestyle China Group Limited
Location: Jing’An, Shanghai, China
Date: 2014 – 2021

Building area:
GFA Shopping Center: Approx. 120,000 m2
Retail design area: 50,000 m2
Design area office: approx. 18,290 m2
Program: Courtyard facade, Retail interior, Office interior, Courtyard landscape
Status: Completed

Credits
Architect: A studio,
The UNStudio team:
Ben van Berkel, Astrid Piber, Hannes Pfau with Ger Gijzen, Marc Salemink, Sontaya Bluangtook and Daniele de Benedictis, Dongbo Han, Enrique Lopez, Lars van Hoften, Tiia Vahula, Martin Zangerl, Mo Lai, Ningzhu Wang, Shuang Zhang, Marta Piaseczynska , Chao Liu, Cristina Bolis, Tom Wong, Yang Li

Advisers
Local architect: TJAD
Facade consultant: Schmidlin
Lighting design: Bartenbach

Photograph: © Aaron & Rex


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10 under-recognized artists who got their due in 2021 – ARTnews.com https://maxkol.org/10-under-recognized-artists-who-got-their-due-in-2021-artnews-com/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://maxkol.org/10-under-recognized-artists-who-got-their-due-in-2021-artnews-com/ After June 2020, almost all institutions said they would implement changes to become more inclusive. Their promises posed an interesting question: What if museums made it a priority to show works by more artists of color and fill in the gaps in art history? In other words, what would it be like for museums to […]]]>

After June 2020, almost all institutions said they would implement changes to become more inclusive. Their promises posed an interesting question: What if museums made it a priority to show works by more artists of color and fill in the gaps in art history? In other words, what would it be like for museums to do what they were supposed to do from the start?

The good news is that the history of art is changing. The bad news is, it’s slowly changing. In 2021, for every survey devoted to a buried giant of the past century, there was, it seems, another, even larger, devoted to one of the most revered white male artists in the history of art. This is currently the case this winter at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, for example, where an exhibition of Etel Adnan is awkwardly made to share space with an investigation by Wassily Kandinsky. Since 2010 alone, the Guggenheim has organized seven Kandinsky exhibitions in its various museums. Until 2021, Adnan, who died this year, had never had an exhibition in a New York museum.

Yet there were some overlooked personalities who finally got their due in 2021 as museums began to change their ways. With each of these showcases, whether in the form of landmark exhibitions in group shows or long-awaited retrospectives, these artists have shone again and earned their place in the annals of art history.

Below, a look at 10 artists who have emerged from the shadows of art history, thanks to major presentations this year.


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In Tribeca, the city’s oldest photo gallery celebrates 50 years https://maxkol.org/in-tribeca-the-citys-oldest-photo-gallery-celebrates-50-years/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 23:01:30 +0000 https://maxkol.org/in-tribeca-the-citys-oldest-photo-gallery-celebrates-50-years/ A recent opening at the Soho Photo Gallery, where up to seven artists each month exhibit their work. The gallery offers nearly 400 linear feet of wall space for hanging photos. Photo: Carl Glassman / Tribeca Trib As Tribeca’s importance as a gallery district grows, the art space that has been in the neighborhood the […]]]>

A recent opening at the Soho Photo Gallery, where up to seven artists each month exhibit their work. The gallery offers nearly 400 linear feet of wall space for hanging photos. Photo: Carl Glassman / Tribeca Trib

As Tribeca’s importance as a gallery district grows, the art space that has been in the neighborhood the longest may be among the most neglected.

This month the Soho Photo Gallery celebrates its 50th anniversary, the last 42 of them in its current home at 15 White Street, where it opened in December 1979 and is the oldest photo gallery in the city.

Over the years, the Cooperative Gallery’s exhibits by members, guest artists, and winners of national and international competitions have included a wide range of photographic practices and techniques. Such variety can be seen in just one visit, with traditional street and landscape photography sharing gallery walls with conceptual and abstract works, or images made in a way that pushes the boundaries of the medium itself.

Photos are for sale, but sales are hardly the goal.

“It’s always been a place where you can come up with something and have it measured by your peers,” said Martin Rich, a longtime member. “And that made me keep working and doing it better.”

Joel Morgovsky called the gallery “essential” to his life as a photographer. “If I weren’t logged into Soho Photo, I wouldn’t be as passionate about photography as I am now,” he said.

Morgovsky noted that an increasing number of people are “involved” in photography, “but they don’t know how to create portfolios, put together shows, edit work and think about photography in general. This is what Soho Photo has always been.

Members are annoyed that The New York Times ignored them in a recent major roundup of Tribeca galleries. “Where were we?Said Norman Borden, member in charge of the gallerycommemoration of the semi-centenary. “We were there first. Weare pioneers!

A gallery-wide anniversary exhibition will be on display from January 7 to 30. “Looking Back: Soho Photo’s First 50 Years” will showcase a sample of 100 works shown at the gallery over the past five decades.

The gallery’s name reflects its origins, at 143 Prince Street, where it opened in a second-floor loft in December 1971. There was no bathroom or office, but plenty of space. for hanging photos. New York Times photographer Librado (Lee) Romero, among its eight founding members, is credited with the idea of ​​creating the gallery.

“There were a couple of photo galleries in town at the time and they weren’t accessible to us,” said David Chalk, one of the gallery’s members.‘s founders and its director for more than 20 years. “So we had our own house and it thrived. “

The gallery would move to two spaces on 13th Street (one of them above the Quad Cinema) before moving to White Street. Works by Andre Kertesz, Minor White, Ansel Adams and other prominent photographers were exhibited during these early years. But in 1979 the gallery had to move and spaces were hard to find. When a spot on Wooster Street collapsed, Ben Fernandez, director of the photography department at The New School, offered the school auditorium as a meeting place, which saved time for the research. continues.

Finally, Chalk stumbled upon 15 White Street, a former live poultry market on the ground floor of one of Tribeca’s first co-ops. “It was a mess,” Chalk recalled in a telephone interview. “There were feathers and bird droppings and it was horrible. There was great potential but it was awful.

So bad, in fact, that Chalk withheld the address from other members even though he asked them for donations to convert the space. But he had a vision for what it could be, and an architectural rendering helped sell the idea.

“They saw this beautiful drawing,” he said. “It was like a magical thing.”

The members share every aspect of how the gallery operates, and it is their work over five months of construction that has transformed a worse-than-raw space into the refined place it is today. Exhibitions of up to seven artists can be hosted in the ground floor and mezzanine galleries.

“Everyone put their time into it and that’s what made the gallery so close with people,” Chalk said. “It’s kind of what invested them in space. Not the money, but the mind.

There are now 90 members, up from 110 at the top of the gallery. Many have aged with the gallery, but there is an effort to bring in new blood, including an internship program with photography students from the Fashion Institute of Technology and online exhibition opportunities for young photographers who are not. not ready or able to join.

The challenges of keeping the gallery in operation have been “ongoing,” said Borden. “Pay the rent, keep the members and try to get our name out there. Still, he noted, he survived the pandemic, which temporarily closed the gallery, with online exhibits. And members have stayed involved by sharing their work each week through Zoom.

“It was not a competition. It was just to show what we were doing, ”Borden said. “People really appreciated the fact that we were a community. “


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